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Download Sword of Honour eBook

by Alexander Kent

Download Sword of Honour eBook
ISBN:
0749325305
Author:
Alexander Kent
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Arrow Books Ltd; New Ed edition (1999)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1238 kb
FB2 book:
1208 kb
DJVU:
1611 kb
Other formats
azw lrf lrf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
249


Ferguson said, "Must be getting back. I have to look at the books

Ferguson said, "Must be getting back. I have to look at the books. Allday followed him out to the yard, and watched as he swung himself up on to the seat. He said, simply, "Thanks, Bryan.

I finished Sword of Honour, book in The Bolitho series by Alexander Kent. I read the first Bolitho novel when I was in high school after completing the Horatio Hornblower series by CS Forester. Since then I have read both series a number of times, with the exception of the last twelve books in the Bolitho series, which I am reading for the first time. As there are five books remaining in the series, I was quite surprised when Admiral Bolitho was killed by an enemy marksmen during a sea battle in Sword of Honour.

The Bolitho novels are a series of nautical war novels written by Douglas Reeman (using the pseudonym Alexander Kent). They focus on the military careers of Richard Bolitho and Adam Bolitho in the Royal Navy, from the time of the American Revolution past the Napoleonic Era. Richard Bolitho is a fictional Royal Navy officer who is the main character in a series of novels written by Douglas Reeman (using the pseudonym Alexander Kent)

Sword Of Honour book. I have read all of the Books written by Douglass Reeman (Alexander Kent) and enjoyed every one.

Sword Of Honour book. In March 1814, Admiral Sir Richard Bolitho returns to England from. If you want a Historical novel you are in the wrong place, likewise they are not always historically correct. However if read as a bit of adventure in the late 18th/early 19th century British Navy,than these books you will enjoy.

Author: Alexander Kent. In March of 1814, Admiral Sir Richard Bolitho returns to England from several months’ rigorous patrolling off the North American coast. The bitter and inconclusive war with the United States has not yet ended, but news of Napoleon’s defeat and abdication has stunned a navy and a nation bled by years of European conflict. Victory has been the impossible dream and now, for Bolitho, a vision of the future and a personal peace seems attainable.

Alexander Kent is the author of twenty-seven acclaimed books featuring Richard Bolitho. Under his own name, Douglas Reeman, and in the course of a career spanning forty-five years, he has written over thirty novels and two non-fiction books. Библиографические данные. Sword Of Honour: (Richard Bolitho: Book 25) Richard Bolitho.

The Complete Midshipman Bolitho. Honour this day. the Bolitho novels: 17. Sloop of War. To Glory We Steer. Command a King’s Ship. Man of War. By philip mccutchan. Halfhyde at the Bight of Benin. McBooks Press, Inc. ww. cbooks. ITHACA, NY. Published by McBooks Press 2000.

Used availability for Alexander Kent's Sword of Honour. November 2001 : UK Hardback.

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Page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
  • Faulkree
I finished Sword of Honour, book #23 in The Bolitho series by Alexander Kent. I read the first Bolitho novel when I was in high school after completing the Horatio Hornblower series by CS Forester. Since then I have read both series a number of times, with the exception of the last twelve books in the Bolitho series, which I am reading for the first time. As there are five books remaining in the series, I was quite surprised when Admiral Bolitho was killed by an enemy marksmen during a sea battle in Sword of Honour. Yes, it’s only a book, a fictional story, but it is sad and bittersweet because as I’ve noted, these books and their characters have become old friends.
  • Jay
Story good but just too many typographical errors. A global edit to remove unnecessary hyphenations would be most welcome. If I could I would ask for my money back because I expect this rather large and repetitive error to be something that just doesn't occur in professional publishing. It seriously detracts from enjoying the reading experience. And I should have remembered from other Douglas Reeman books that he just doesn't like happy endings.
  • Ariseym
Trying my best not to let out spoilers while giving my honest opinion of this book.

Let's face it we do not read these books for the incredible Prose or in depth of use of the English language. We read them because we know the friend and Confidant will say "and that's no error!"

We read these books to experience a time, a place and a hero. A hero we sympathize with one that we believe in the end will get to have his day in Cornwall with his beloved.

This is why I read them this is why I empathize with the admiral of the red.

I am very disappointed in this book and debating whether or not I wish to continue.

The manner in which the cliffhanger is aired on a total of 1 page is very disappointing. Such an event deserves more and deserves to be in Cornwall with Katherine at his side.
  • INwhite
I had to read the last of the Richard books. I am almost sorry I did. I know the author, Reeman, has passed on but why do they always have to F/U a story by killing protagonist? Why couldn't he just let Richard retire in piece with Catherine and let the two live they so richly deserved. F. you reeman. There was cause to kill him him off.
  • Adrierdin
Seemed more a historical romance than a continuation of Sir Richard's adventures. I understand Kent's desire to phase out the Admiral and focus on Adam - more adventure with the young captain - but the effort to have Bolitho live a parallel life (and death) with Nelson was carried too far.

Definitely agree with those who thought the book maudlin. I've read the series twice, this time I stopped at the beginning of Chapter 6 in Sword of Honour to begin a second reading of Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series
  • Grotilar
Ok, the frost dozen books filled my need after reading the Hornblower series and the Aubrey Maturin series, and while the Bolitho series was not up to those standards, they were still pretty good, but by now I get the feeling that even the author feels like he is flogging a dead horse. The writing has become trite (when I read a phrase like "she was nothing to him, yet she was everything" I usually put a book down straightaway. To me this nothing/everything mechanism is both meaningless and trite, while attempting to appear deep. Lately I've been finding this at least twice in each novel. There's a lot of unnecessarily repeated devices in these novels that are explained over and over ad nauseum, for example the unruly lock of hair covering the scar, or the phrase "dearest of men," which made me cringe every time I read it. By the end of Sword of Honor I was actually rooting for the Algerine pirates to bring this part to the end of its suffering. The series actually started off really well, and I looked forward to the next, but by now Kent has clearly lost his writing mojo. You might expect an author to become more adept in his writing, and mature in his vision of the story, but the opposite seems to be the case here. The cliches increase and the repetition becomes, well...repetitious. I feel like the writing devolves rather evolve. I'm going to power through to the end of the series because I feel like I have so much invested at this point. I know this is not a rational decision, but is based on my own compulsion to not leave a job unfinished. It has gone from naval adventure to soap opera. Captain Aubrey, where are you?
  • Kegal
This is a great book series but this volume is not up to Kent's standard work. In this volume, he repeats far too much of the previous stories. I would not have brought this volume 23 had I known.
Superb stories of sailing warships. Learned much about sail configuration in all kinds of weather, gunnery, and the brutal discipline of that era. Truly enjoyed all of the books. Wished he was still writing. Would love to hear more of the trans-generational Bolitho family of naval officers.