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Download An American Brat: A Novel eBook

by Bapsi Sidhwa

Download An American Brat: A Novel eBook
ISBN:
1571310495
Author:
Bapsi Sidhwa
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Milkweed Editions; Reprint edition (January 24, 2006)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1473 kb
FB2 book:
1158 kb
DJVU:
1888 kb
Other formats
txt mbr azw docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
429


An American Brat book.

An American Brat book. Unlike Bapsi Sidhwa's well-etched characters with whom you usually find something fascinating, An American Brat didn't hold anything too exciting either in terms of premise or its characters except the initial positions between Cyrus and Zareen, which again is in her forte of depicting Parsi families.

An American Brat: A Novel. An American Brat - Bapsi Sidhwa. This delightful coming-of-age novel is both remarkably a remarkably funny and acute portrayal of America as seen through the eyes of a perceptive young immigrant. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. carousel previous carousel next.

In An American Brat, Pakistani-born novelist Bapsi Sidhwa reveals with a humorous yet incisive eye the . Sidhwa begins her novel in Lahore, Pakistan

Sidhwa begins her novel in Lahore, Pakistan. Feroza Gunwalla, a 16-year-old Parsee, is mortified by the sight of her mother appearing at her school with her arms uncovered. For Zareen Gunwalla, Feroza’s outspoken 40-something mother, it is a chilling moment.

396 printed pages To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Feroza Ginwalla, a pampered, protected 16-year-old Pakistani girl, is sent to America by her parents, who are alarmed by the fundamentalism overtaking Pakistan - and their daughter. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Hoping that a few months with her uncle, an MIT grad student, will soften the girl's rigid thinking, they get more than they bargained for: Feroza, enthralled by American culture and her new freedom, insists on staying.

Feroza Ginwalla, a pampered, protected 16-year-old Pakistani girl, is sent to America by her parents, who are alarmed by the fundamentalism overtaking Pakistan - and their daughter. Hoping that a few months with her uncle, an MIT grad student, will soften the girl’s rigid thinking, they get more than they bargained for: Feroza, enthralled by American culture and her new freedom, insists on staying.

As An American Brat opens in Pakistan, the extended family of sixteen-year-old Feroza Ginwalla, a lively and temperamental young girl, agonize over the decision to send Feroza to America for a three-month holiday?

As An American Brat opens in Pakistan, the extended family of sixteen-year-old Feroza Ginwalla, a lively and temperamental young girl, agonize over the decision to send Feroza to America for a three-month holiday? This act of apparent audacity arises from concern over Feroza's conservative attitudes which stem from Pakistan's rising tide of fundamentalism. Feroza's chaperone in America, an uncle only six years her senior, is her guide, friend, and the bane of her existence. Her relationships and adventures shape her alternately hilarious and terrifying perceptions of America.

Bapsi Sidhwa (Urdu: بیپسی سدھوا‎; born 11 August 1936) is a Pakistani American novelist of Gujarati Parsi descent who writes in English and is resident in the United States

Bapsi Sidhwa (Urdu: بیپسی سدھوا‎; born 11 August 1936) is a Pakistani American novelist of Gujarati Parsi descent who writes in English and is resident in the United States. She is best known for her collaborative work with Indo-Canadian filmmaker Deepa Mehta: Sidhwa wrote both the 1991 novel Ice Candy Man which served as the basis for Mehta's 1998 film Earth as well as the 2006 novel Water: A Novel on which is based Mehta's 2005 film Water

An American Brat A Novel.

An American Brat A Novel.

They rode the ferry to the Statue of Liberty and explored the iron innards of the stern figure presiding over the ocean rld Trade towers at the tip of t. .

They rode the ferry to the Statue of Liberty and explored the iron innards of the stern figure presiding over the ocean rld Trade towers at the tip of the island. They strolled with the nannies and babies through the zoo at Central Park, marveling each time they lifted their incredulous eyes from the wild animals in their native habitats to the shimmering glass and steel embankments of the Manhattan skyline reflecting the sunlight.

Feroza Ginwalla, a pampered, protected 16-year-old Pakistani girl, is sent to America by her parents, who are alarmed by the fundamentalism overtaking Pakistan — and their daughter. Hoping that a few months with her uncle, an MIT grad student, will soften the girl’s rigid thinking, they get more than they bargained for: Feroza, enthralled by American culture and her new freedom, insists on staying. A bargain is struck, allowing Feroza to attend college with the understanding that she will return home and marry well. As a student in a small western town, Feroza’s perceptions of America, her homeland, and herself begin to alter. When she falls in love with and wants to marry a Jewish American, her family is aghast. Feroza realizes just how far she has come — and wonders how much further she can go. This delightful coming-of-age novel is both remarkably funny and a remarkably acute portrayal of America as seen through the eyes of a perceptive young immigrant.
  • Cesar
"I feel if there's one little thing I could do, it's to make people realize: We are not worthless because we inhabit a country which is seen by Western eyes as a primitive, fundamentalist country only. . .I mean, we are a rich mixture of all sorts of forces as well, and our lives are very much worth living," - Bapsi Sidhwa

"American Brat," written by Pakistani native Bapsi Sidhwa, delves into the journey of Feroza Ginwalla, the daughter of a wealthy Parsee family, as she navigates her way through obstacles in a new country - the United States. Guided by her Americanized uncle Manek, Feroza is forced to confront challenges that comes with being a conservative Pakistani immigrant, through her experiences in college as well as the romantic partners she chooses.

The Ginwalla family is a Parsee family located within the city of Karachi in Pakistan, a nation that follows the ideologies of Islamic fundamentalism. After Zareen, Feroza's mother, is alarmed by Feroza's traditional nature that are similar to the nation's Muslim values, she decides to send her to United States to live with her uncle, Manek. Manek, who often clashed when Feroza when she was younger, teaches Feroza about the American way of life through their visit to New York City, as well as Boston, Massachusetts, where Manek lives. After Manek decides Feroza should get an education, she enrolls in a conservative college in Twin Falls, Idaho, where her roommate, Jo, exposes her to the dating and social aspect of the American way of life. As Feroza becomes more assimilated to the American lifestyle, she decides to continue her education and even falls in love with a boy of Jewish faith, David - decisions that her Parsee mother, Zareen, are not happy with.

Throughout the novel, Sidhwa spares no time in delineating her characters - in several instances, she directly explains each character's feelings towards a situation; for example, after Feroza decides to elope with David, she specifically explains Zareen's reasons for protesting against their relationship. Although directly describing characters is not necessarily a bad thing, Sidhwa doesn't leave any room for inference on the reader's part - compared to novels such as "Interpreter of Maladies," where the personalities of characters are indirectly depicted, this directness can be surprising for readers that appreciate the time and effort authors take to develop and portray a character.

However, Sidhwa does touch upon some important themes throughout the novel. When Zareen expresses her uneasiness with Feroza's thoughts of staying in America to continue schooling, Sidhwa begins to explore the theme of education. While Zareen believes education should not be a top priority, as readers will see within the novel, Feroza realizes the opportunities an education can bring, which plays as a deciding factor in many of her decisions. Marriage is also a theme Sidhwa explores- by portraying the obstacles Feroza and David face when trying to involve Zareen within their elopement. During Zareen's visit, Feroza and David encounter problems with marriage because of their different faiths, and readers will see how they choose to handle the situation as a result. Throughout the novel, Sidhwa also uses humor and wit to describe the atmosphere the story takes place in. Zareen's frustration with Feroza's conservative attitude is portrayed in a comical argument with her husband, as a way to describe the Islamic fundamentalism that is a part of the country's culture.

Ultimately, I would recommend to this book to readers who are looking to learn more about Pakistan in general, since "An American Brat" does a wonderful job in describing the political atmosphere that the story takes places in - throughout the novel, Sidhwa makes several references to the Bhutto trial and the Pakistan's People Party. In addition, I would recommend to this book to those who want to learn more about the predicaments an immigrant faces when coming to a new country, specifically one of East Indian origin - Sidhwa's humorous portrayal of Feroza's struggles serve as a good example of this. This book is appropriate for both teenagers and adults, because it illustrates situations, including marriage and education, which both age groups can relate to. I would not recommend this book to readers who prefer authors that take time to develop characters - Sidhwa is very direct with character delineations, a writing style that may not be appreciated by all readers.

By exploring themes such as marriage and education, as well as her witty writing style, Sidhwa exceptionally illustrates the problems a Pakistani immigrant faces when coming to a new country. In "An American Brat", readers will not only learn more about the Pakistani culture, but also how difficult it is to be an immigrant coming to a new country. Through Feroza's journey, Sidhwa indeed proves to readers that Pakistanis "are not worthless."
  • JoldGold
An American Brat is a novel in which Bapsi Sidhwa aims to demonstrate the ability that individuals have in adjusting to life in a new environment. In her novel we follow the life of Feroza, a Pakistani girl who is sent to America in order to lessen her ultra conservative ways. We are first introduced to Feroza and her family in Lahore, Pakistan. We learn of their rich lifestyle and their religion of Parsee. She is sent to American to live with her uncle Manek and through him, and various roommates that she obtains as the book progresses, she is taught the basis, both the good and the bad, of the American lifestyle. Unfortunately there is very little character development. Most of the characters in the novel are flat and barely change in any form through the novel. Feroza seems to be the only one who accepts and embraces change. The book is full of political issues and various hot button topics that seem to be prevalent in almost every chapter. However, through humor, Bapsi Sidhwa is able to have her characters express their own opinions on each topic. It can be a lengthy read with a little over 300 pages however the simplistic style of writing aids the reader in breezing through pages. I would recommend this book only as a pleasure read.
  • Gigafish
Every country has its unique culture that shapes the people inhabiting it. When traveling to these foreign countries, would you alter your habits in order to fit the cultural norm present? Or would you stay constant with your culture back at home? Sixteen-year-old Feroza Ginwalla answers this question herself when she moves from Lahore, Pakistan to America. Her mother, Zareen, wants Feroza to soften her perception of life and escape the overly conservative nature in Pakistan. Upon her arrival in America, Feroza lives with her uncle Manek, until she eventually enrolls at Twin Falls, a college in Idaho and lives with her roommate Jo. Through her experience at college, her views on American culture and ways begin to take a new form. Feroza falls in love with a Jewish American boy, David, and desires to marry him. Her family is shocked because Feroza is supposed to be married to a pre-determined man in Pakistan. This plot twist sends Feroza into deep thought about how much she is actually invested in her new American life and what she is, or is not, willing to do to continue living it. An American Brat is a novel in which America is portrayed in a fresh light. It allows readers to understand American culture from an immigrant’s perspective. The novel also shows readers how strong of an influence a different culture can have on a person at an age so vulnerable to being molded.
The story of how Feroza makes the transition from a conservative, Pakistani, young woman to an American begins when Feroza’s flight to America takes off, “and as she hurtled through space, she became conscious also of the gravitational pull of the country she was leaving behind” (Sidhwa). Little does Feroza know that eventually the country she will feel the most pull from will be America. Two aspects of An American Brat stood out to me and deepened my liking for the book. When Feroza lands at Kennedy Airport, and is immediately questioned and thoroughly checked by the security officers on duty. This sets the reader up to think that Feroza begins her trip with a negative outlook of America. I liked how the author tricks you in a sense into believing that Feroza’s journey will just go downhill from that point on, and she will end up disliking America. The second aspect of the book that I liked was the light and humorous tone Sidhwa uses throughout the story. Feroza moves to Colorado with Jo when Manek returns to Pakistan to find a wife. Manek plays a joke on his family by arriving in Pakistan with bandages around his face, pretending to be hurt. One aspect of the book that I did not like was the lack of support from both Feroza and David’s families when they announced that they wanted to get married. Although I did not like this aspect, it taught me that some cultures are very against people marrying outside their culture. The book also taught me that culture and politics are very different in certain parts of the world, and lives in each of these countries vastly differ.
An American Brat is a fast and easy read that gives a fresh perspective on American life through the eyes of an immigrant. It is an appealing book because it hooks the reader by having them continually wondering what will happen next in Feroza’s life. The content is easy to understand and the plot line is simple to follow. I strongly recommend Bapsi Sidhwa’s novel An American Brat.

--Blockbuster