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Download The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The &lt;i&gt;Iliad,&lt;/i&gt; the &lt;i&gt;Odyssey,&lt;/i&gt; and the Migration of Myth eBook

by Felice Vinci

Download The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The &lt;i&gt;Iliad,&lt;/i&gt; the &lt;i&gt;Odyssey,&lt;/i&gt; and the Migration of Myth eBook
ISBN:
1594770522
Author:
Felice Vinci
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Inner Traditions; Tra edition (December 20, 2005)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1733 kb
FB2 book:
1536 kb
DJVU:
1243 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
979


The Baltic Origins of Ho. .has been added to your Cart. For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, finding the author’s descriptions at odds with the geography he purportedly describes.

The Baltic Origins of Ho.

Georg Feuerstein, Traditional Yoga Studies, Oct 2006). FELICE VINCI is a nuclear engineer with an extensive background in Latin and Greek studies. The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales is a rare example of a book that turns received notions upside-down. Joscelyn Godwin, translator of Hypnerotomachia Poliphili). Powerful, methodical, important, and convincing.

In this book Vinci lays out 100s of bits of evidence that Homer's tales originate from the Nordic countries, which is not all that unlikely to begin with.

Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece

Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece. Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic Ocean.

The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales is an essay written by Felice Vinci, a nuclear engineer and amateur historian, published for the first time in 1995. Felice Vinci started reading Greek classics and learned about a passage from the De facie quae in orbe lunae apparet, by Plutarch, which points out the location of Ogygia

Felice Vinci is a nuclear engineer, amateur historian and author of The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales, The Illiad, The Odyssey and .

Felice Vinci is a nuclear engineer, amateur historian and author of The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales, The Illiad, The Odyssey and The Migration of Myth. William Mullen received his BA in Classics from Harvard College and his PhD from the University of Texas. He was a Professor or post-doctoral Fellow at Berkeley, Princeton, Boston University, and Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies and St. John’s College. Also, we talk about why some tribes in Northern Europe might have stayed during the climate change.

Using meticulous analysis, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the .

Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic Ocean. For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes.

the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the migration of myth. Neighboring lands and islands. Climate and chronology : the northern origin of the Mycenaeans. The catalog of ships : the northern Achaean world. The regions of the Peloponnese. Phthia, Crete, the River Egypt, and Pharos. Finding the home of the gods. Climate change and the migration of culture. Solar, stellar, and lunar myths.

Place of Publication. Myths Paperback Adult Learning & University Books. Rochester, Vt. Genre. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Compelling evidence that the events of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey took place in the Baltic and not the Mediterranean• Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece • Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic OceanFor years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's Isle was only five days sailing from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea. Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the dense, foggy weather described by Ulysses befits northern not Mediterranean climes, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how a decline of the "climatic optimum" caused the blond seafarers to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down to the following ages, only later to be codified by Homer in the Iliad and the Odyssey.Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors that allow us to consider the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.
  • Zainn
Well, extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. I remain agnostic on the matter and await further research and archaeology. Plate techtonics used to be the subject of fourth grade teachers' ridicule as they introduced maps of the world and commented on the similarity of the coastlines of Africa and South America; science provided proof. Stories of Australian aborigines about the "Dream Time" climate and flora have been corroborated by the fossil record. Not every ancient legend can be proved, Thor Heyerdahl's theory that the Polynesians came from North and South America is not borne out by DNA, or by the Polynesian sailing practices (explore to windward, so you can go home with the wind), but I won't dismiss this out of hand. I am troubled by the idea that every place name finds a close cognate in the Baltic, absent proof that the names are in fact ancient.
  • Longitude Temporary
A very interesting take. I believe that in Beowulf there is a term used, "spear Danes" that is quite similar to a Homeric "spear Danaans" that some may have noticed even before this book came out. There is also a whirlpool in the story of Jason and the argonauts which reminds one of the famous Norwegian whirlpools. In fact, many years ago while reading the story I noticed this and wondered if there might be some truth to the tale but if perhaps Jason and the Argonauts encountered this near Norway instead of in the Mediterranean or Black Seas. Of course I didn't notice all of the other geographic parallels that Vinci notes. Curiosly, I did not notice Vinci mentioning the whirlpool story, but of course he was speaking of Homer's tales and not the Argnonautica.

The idea that the Hebrews came from Finland seems like a stretch and if the Aryans of India came from that region and Vinci is correct, the entire field of Indo-European studies will be turned on its head.
  • Gio
Vinci does a very credible job of proving that Homer's epic tales actually took place in the far north and were brought to the Mediterranean by the populace when they moved south. They tried to transcribed the locations of their homeland onto their new environment and failed in many places. This explains why scholars have been puzzled by the many inconsistencies in the stories.

There were only two problems I had with the book: it needed more maps and could have benefited from some actual pictures of the areas he was describing. He also blew it at the very end when, almost as an afterthought, he tried to claim that ancient biblical history could have originated from this area as well. Since this was speculation and not proven as was Homer's stories, it should have been left out. It tainted an otherwise well researched book.

Vinci succeeded in what he set out to do and proves that history is malleable and not set in stone like many believe.
  • Malak
This is an extraordinarily persuasive, intellectually satisfying, and memorable book. It's far from perfect - the all-important maps are sub-standard, confusing, and there aren't enough of them, and it engages in unnecessarily (but interestingly) wild speculation in the final chapters. But the core argument of the book is unaffected by these faults, and remains startlingly plausible: that the Homeric epics, even as they stand, show signs of referring to events occurring in north-western Europe about 900 years earlier than the conventional location and time (Greece and Turkey in about 900 BCE), and of being originally composed not long after that and subsequently migrating, together with the people for whom, and about whom, they were composed, to the south-eastern corner of Europe where a great many place-names from the Baltic region were reassigned by the immigrants to places in their new homeland in exactly the way later waves of colonisers have always done. (How else, for example, does one explain Homer's descriptions of the rocky and mountainous Peloponnese in Odyssey Bk 4 as a flat plain?). Vinci's linguistic evidence of 'parallel' places in both regions is remarkable, as is the evidence from the Catalogue of Ships in Iliad Bk 2. Not surprisingly, I suppose, the book has been greeted with scepticism by classical scholars I have spoken to about it, none of whom, however, had actually read it or even heard of it until I brought them the news. I was only able to persuade one of them to read it, and he rejected it without offering any serious critique. The inertia of the academy never ceases to amaze me, but I promise you, no curious person with an interest in the ancient world should overlook this book.
  • Gindian
Well researched and argued.
  • SlingFire
A most original and well argued theory that attempts to sort out the many inconsistencies of the Iliad and Odyssey. Sometimes even convincing.
  • Galanjov
I have always had some doubts as to the authenticity of the location of Troy via vis Schliemann. This book presents a new look at the subject, moving the location of Troy to an area I had never considered as a possible location. The author makes some good points. The book was entertaining and thought-provoking. Right or wrong, this work provided fuel for more questions and some lively dinner conversation. Keep an open mind and enjoy.