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by Jeanine Herman,Julia Kristeva

Download The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt eBook
ISBN:
0231109970
Author:
Jeanine Herman,Julia Kristeva
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Columbia University Press (December 15, 2001)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1880 kb
FB2 book:
1419 kb
DJVU:
1111 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
911


Julia Kristeva is a practicing psychoanalyst and professor of linguistics at the University of Paris. She is the author of many acclaimed books, including, most recently, Hannah Arendt and Melanie Klein. Jeanine Herman is a translator who lives in New York City.

Julia Kristeva is a practicing psychoanalyst and professor of linguistics at the University of Paris. Библиографические данные.

Kristeva’s position has shifted dramatically over the years from this political concept of revolution .

Kristeva’s position has shifted dramatically over the years from this political concept of revolution to a totally psychic position. In her two books Intimate Revolt and The Sense and Nonsense of Revolt, Kristeva explains a new concept of revolt as the substitute of rebellious ideologies and political actions (2000). The modern subject of spectacle, according to her, is incapable anymore of action, let alone political revolt. New York: Columbia UP. (1982) Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection.

Linguist, psychoanalyst, and cultural theorist, Julia Kristeva is one of the most influential and prolific thinkers of our time. Her work is unique in that it skillfully brings together psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice, literature, linguistics, and philosophy. In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma

Linguist, psychoanalyst, and cultural theorist, Julia Kristeva is one of the most influential and prolific thinkers of our time. In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone.

I've always thought that Julia Kristeva's books only hang together in the most tenuous way. Tales of Love, for instance . Tales of Love, for instance, has no genuine coherence, only a common theme. As usual, Kristeva simply plonks each chapter on these authors next to each other without any writerly sense as to how they might be connected - that is supposed to be obvious, even though it's not. I haven't read much of Kristeva's recent work, but this book gives me the sense that she is stuck in a repetitive rut, going over the same tired ideas, stuck in a psychoanalytic orthodoxy, that sadly betrays the potential of her earlier works. In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma

The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt.

The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt. Julia Kristeva is an internationally known psychoanalyst and critic, is Professor of Linguistics at the University de Paris VII and chief proponent of semanalyse, a term she coined to name the discipline that blends semiotics with pyschoanalysis. Noted by the San Fransisco Chronicle-Examiner as a woman whose writings demonstrate "her amazing command of history, politics, literature, linguistics, and psychoogy," Kristeva recently hosted.

Julia Kristeva, Jeanine Herman. Linguist, psychoanalyst, and cultural theorist, Julia Kristeva is one of the most influential and prolific thinkers of our time. In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma

Start by marking The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt . Kristeva begins by outlining how the words "revolt" and "revolution" have changed etymologically over time, only taking on their political meanings in more modern times

Start by marking The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt: The Powers and Limits of Psychoanalysis as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Kristeva begins by outlining how the words "revolt" and "revolution" have changed etymologically over time, only taking on their political meanings in more modern times. She then complains about how modern culture has nonetheless made revolt impossible, that we are locked into a world of compliant entertainment. Kristeva asserts that we "need" a new attitude of revolt, but as to what why we would require such a thing, or what its effectiveness might be, she never reveals.

Linguist, psychoanalyst, and cultural theorist, Julia Kristeva is one of the most influential and prolific thinkers of our time. Her writings have broken new ground in the study of the self, the mind, and the ways in which we communicate through language. Her work is unique in that it skillfully brings together psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice, literature, linguistics, and philosophy.In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. Freud and psychoanalysis taught us that rebellion is what guarantees our independence and our creative abilities. But in our contemporary "entertainment" culture, is rebellion still a viable option? Is it still possible to build and embrace a counterculture? For whom―and against what―and under what forms?Kristeva illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three twentieth-century writers: the existentialist John Paul Sartre, the surrealist Louis Aragon, and the theorist Roland Barthes. For Kristeva the rebellions championed by these figures―especially the political and seemingly dogmatic political commitments of Aragon and Sartre―strike the post-Cold War reader with a mixture of fascination and rejection. These theorists, according to Kristeva, are involved in a revolution against accepted notions of identity―of one's relation to others. Kristeva places their accomplishments in the context of other revolutionary movements in art, literature, and politics. The book also offers an illuminating discussion of Freud's groundbreaking work on rebellion, focusing on the symbolic function of patricide in his Totem and Taboo and discussing his often neglected vision of language, and underscoring its complex connection to the revolutionary drive.