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Download From the New Criticism to Deconstruction: The Reception of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism eBook

by Art Berman

Download From the New Criticism to Deconstruction: The Reception of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism eBook
ISBN:
0252015088
Author:
Art Berman
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press (May 1, 1988)
Pages:
331 pages
EPUB book:
1120 kb
FB2 book:
1321 kb
DJVU:
1205 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
320


It focuses on the influence of French structuralism and post-structuralism on American deconstruction within . Deconstruction and PostStructuralism. Deconstruction the New Criticism and Romanticism.

It focuses on the influence of French structuralism and post-structuralism on American deconstruction within a wide-ranging context that includes literary criticism, philosophy, psychology, technology, and politics. 224. Interpretation as Impasse. 276. Science and Literary Interpretation.

Berman, Art (1988) From the New Criticism to Deconstruction: The Reception of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, University of Illinois Press, Chicago. 3. Brown, Jane Ellen (2012) “New Criticism” and the study of poetry. Theses, Dissertations, Professional Paper. 4. Culler, Jonathan (2002) Structuralist Poetics: Structuralism, Linguistics and the Study of Literature. 5. Dickstein, Morris (1996) The Rise and Fall of 'Practical' Criticism: From I. A. Richards to Barthes and Derrida.

Berman, Art. From the New Criticism to Deconstruction: The Reception of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. Cultural Criticism, Literary Theory, Poststructuralism. New York: Columbia UP, 1992. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1988.

Post-structuralism is either a continuation or a rejection of the intellectual project that preceded it-structuralism.

Post-structuralism is either a continuation or a rejection of the intellectual project that preceded it-structuralism

Typical of deconstruction- radical linguistic scepticism.

7. Sign signifier + signified. Red rose (signifiers). Typical of deconstruction- radical linguistic scepticism. 18. Differences between structuralism and post-structuralism- a) Origin: i) Structuralism derives ultimately from linguistics. ii) Post-structuralism derives ultimately from philosophy. Nietzsche- „There are no facts, only interpretations.

It focuses on the influence of French structuralism and post-structuralism on American deconstruction within a wide-ranging context that includes literary criticism, philosophy, psychology, technology, and politics

It focuses on the influence of French structuralism and post-structuralism on American deconstruction within a wide-ranging context that includes literary criticism, philosophy, psychology, technology, and politics. From the New Criticism to Deconstruction traces the transitions in American critical theory and practice from the 1950s to the 1980s. It focuses on the influence of French structuralism and post-structuralism on American deconstruction within a wide-ranging context that includes literary criticism, philosophy, psychology, technology, and politics.

The literary theory of structuralism focuses largely on the structure of. .Post-structuralism and post-modernism when spoken as schools of thought are often intermixed or regarded as the same thing.

The literary theory of structuralism focuses largely on the structure of patterns in text and literary imagery.

Are you sure you want to remove From the new criticism to deconstruction from your list? . the reception of structuralism and post-structuralism. Published 1988 by University of Illinois Press in Urbana.

Are you sure you want to remove From the new criticism to deconstruction from your list? From the new criticism to deconstruction. Deconstruction, Structuralism (Literary analysis), Internet Archive Wishlist.

the New Criticism to Deconstruction : The Reception of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. Aims to say interesting things, both about the hybrid character of Anglo-American criticism and about the French theory that it imports and then proceeds to manhandle.

From the New Criticism to Deconstruction : The Reception of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism.

Poststructuralism emphasised the indeterminate and polysemic nature of semiotic codes and the arbitrary and constructed nature of the foundations of knowledge

Poststructuralism emphasised the indeterminate and polysemic nature of semiotic codes and the arbitrary and constructed nature of the foundations of knowledge. Having originated in a politically volatile climate, the theory laid greater stress on the operations of ideology and power on human subjectivity.

  • Ericaz
In FROM THE NEW CRITICISM TO DECONSTUCTION, Art Berman takes an in depth look at a forty year stretch that begins with the New Critics in the 1930s, follows with America's brief critical flirtation with structuralism in the 1950s, and concludes with Jacques Derrida introducing the logocentric shattering era of deconstruction in the late 1960s. Berman tries mightily to be both comprehensive and impartial, though he is more successful in the former than in the latter.

He begins with the 17th century empiricism of classic philosophers like Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume, then skips roughly two centuries to the New Critics. Berman's analysis of New Critics like Richards, Eliot, Brooks, Ransom, and Wimsatt is bedrock. He notes that though the New Critics held that each text had a core of meaning which could be endlessly debated as to the extent it was infused with irony and paradox, they were unanimous that there was indeed a core lurking somewhere within. The phrase "indeterminacy" did not mean that there was a total lack of some universally accepted meaning but rather that this meaning could shift and wriggle from one literary hook to another and the critical fisherman would eventually reel in his linguistic catch.

Berman discusses why existentialism and structuralism caught on in France but did not do so in America. He tends to see both as precursors to deconstruction, which simply states that there is no "there" there. Berman does a thorough job of how Derrida took the signifier/signified tenets of Saussure and altered them in a way that Derrida used to ground his theory of endless deferral of meaning. The problem that I saw was that Berman was too quick to accept the logic of this deferral. John Ellis in AGAINST DECONSTRUCTION points out that Derrida's alteration of Saussure's sign system is fatally flawed in that a signifier can not become a signified nor vice versa. As soon as one sees this, the game is over. Still, Berman's book is a worthy addition to the critic's bookshelf.
  • Moronydit
The Fate of Empricism, the epistemic foundation of modern science. . .

I don't know about you, but I find virtually all the critical analysis of deconstruction at the least opaque, often strangely elusive, and, more often than not, inscrutible. The highly touted Deconstruction: Theory & Practice (Norris), I find challenging, with only moderate reward for many hours of effort. Despite the excellent reviews it receives here on Amazon and its svelte appearance, I personally find the Norris book on many pages as difficult to comprehend as Derrida, whom I was fortunate to experience in seminar, himself.
For these reasons, From the New Criticism to Deconstruction is a revelation. Well received by readers of literary criticism, probably the primary arena for deconstruction, the book is virtually unknown in philosophic circles, where it deserves a wider audience. Berman displays a solid background in philosophy, psychology, literature, and literary criticism, and a mature understanding of their interrelations and resonances.
Berman's focus is epistemology. His claim is that the shift from the New Criticism to Structuralist and Post-Structuralist approaches in post-1970 American literary criticism to Deconstructive post-modern analyses in numerous disciplines epistemically parallels the shift from 17th century empiricism to the scepticism of Hume. "The movement from Hobbes to Hume, via Locke, resembles the movement from Saussure to Derrida, via structuralists like Levi-Strauss". This claim both frames and characterizes the uncluttered, accessible, enlightening analysis one finds in this lucid and comprehensive intellectual history. Most importantly, Berman's argument is relevant as well as revealing, as the work of Derrida, the lodestar of this move, emerges from a specifically epistemic orientation, from the philosophic, rather than a literary or linguistic matrix of thought, which, in fact, it did.
In it's largest ambitions, the book is a comprehensive,though manageable, history of epistemology, from the onset of 17th century empiricism through deconstruction, albeit, sans analyses of pragmatism and germanic/anglo-american analytic philosophy.
In brief, the book is the most accessible, straightfoward account of this crucial epoch in both the history of philosophy and literary theory of the past half-century that I've encountered. The reading is a blessing for humble, "non-specialist" students who simply seek to get a handle on the meaning and significance of "structuralism", "post-structuralism", "deconstruction", without the rigamarole one which tends to inevitably beset one in books that attempt to explain them.
  • Jugore
Berman's book is the best intellectually history I have encountered of the rise of French Theory in American (and British) literary criticism and how the ground was prepared for it by New Criticism.

The book is clearly written, erudite, and fair. I disagree with the previous reviewer who spoke of it as adopting "jargon." Except for the terms he must quote from philosophers and critics who are something less than plain-spoken (Derrida, principally), Berman is extremely direct and writes superbly and accessibly. He will be intelligible to literary scholars, philosophers, and historians who have some background in the ideas of structuralism and post-structuralism. (This book would not make a good starting point for readers coming fresh to those movements.)

"From the New Criticism to Deconstruction" is unusual, however, in its command of the philosophical tradition (both English-language and Continental) in the modern period. This is a rare book from the "literary" side of the adoption of theory that is equally authoritative and comfortable in the realms of philosophy in which the Continental movements, especially, originate.

A very fine and overlooked book.