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Download Bloodroot: Reflections on Place by Appalachian Women Writers eBook

by Joyce Dyer

Download Bloodroot: Reflections on Place by Appalachian Women Writers eBook
ISBN:
0813109833
Author:
Joyce Dyer
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky (March 2, 2000)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1930 kb
FB2 book:
1693 kb
DJVU:
1449 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
490


Dyer's collection of short essays by some 35 'Appalachian women writers' makes a fairly riveting witness to the whole .

Dyer's collection of short essays by some 35 'Appalachian women writers' makes a fairly riveting witness to the whole process of deciding that you are from anywhere, and what that means anyway. ―Appalachian Journal. Each essay is filled with illuminating honesty and allows the reader to glance into the writer's soul. It's a book that's been around now for nearly twenty years.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Bloodroot: Reflections on Place by Appalachian Women Writers as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

For more than 150 years, writers from Appalachia, especially women writers, have lived on the margins of American literature. Joyce Dyer's impressive collection includes the reflections of thirty-five Appalachian literary women. Some names are familiar, others less so, but in essays that often veer into poetry, all address the influence of region on their writing.

This is a volume of celebration

Bloodroot: Reflections on Place by Appalachian Women Writers. Published by: University Press of Kentucky. This is a volume of celebration. Of general celebration of the literary renaissance that is taking place in the hills of Appalachia among its sons and daughters.

Joyce Dyer is director of the .

Joyce Dyer is director of the Lindsay-Crane Center for Writing and Literature at Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio, and John S. Kenyon Professor of English. Dyer has won numerous awards for her writing, including the 1998 Appalachian Book of the Year Award and the 2009 David B. Saunders Award in Creative Nonfiction.

Joyce Dyer (born July 20, 1947) is a . writer of nonfiction and memoirs whose most recent memoir, Goosetown: Reconstructing an Akron Neighborhood, tells the story of the author's attempt to remember the first five years of her life growing up in an ethnic neighborhood in Akron called Old Wolf Ledge (known to residents as "Goosetown"), famous for its. glacial formations, breweries, and cereal mills.

Earlier memoirs were

Winner of the 1997 Appalachian Studies Award Appalachian Writers Association 1999 Book of the Year .

It's a book that's been around now for nearly twenty years. Joyce Dyer is director of the Lindsay-Crane Center for Writing and Literature at Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio, and John S.

Winner of the 1997 Appalachian Studies Award Appalachian Writers Association 1999 Book of the Year Winner of the Susan Koppleman Award of the Popular Culture Association for Best Edited Collection in Women's Studies Joyce Dyer is director of writing and associate professor of English at Hiram College, Ohio."
  • Zovaithug
As a woman from Appalachia, this book is very moving. It paints an accurate picture of how where you come from influences you, without you ever knowing it. It's a collection of essays, with diverse points of view. Most of the essays are wonderful and interesting, but some of them are a struggle to keep up with. (Boring, self-important, missing the point, etc.) But overall, if you're looking for Appalachian literature, this is a must-have. It tells is just like it is. Beautiful and haunting.
  • Meztisho
I checked this book out from the library and then purchased it for Kindle before I ever finished the library book. I found it to be truly inspirational and informative as I work on my thesis on my own family's rural Southern roots. I marked so many pages and quotes that spoke to me and that I'll refer to over and over again.
  • Black_Hawk_Down
I've been reading a lot of opinions lately about the current bestseller, HILLBILLY ELEGY, by JD Vance, some positive, some not. I have not yet read the Vance book, but I hope to soon. In the meantime I recommend this book, BLOODROOT: REFLECTIONS ON PLACE BY APPALACHIAN WOMEN WRITERS, by Joyce Dyer (Editor). It's a book that's been around now for nearly twenty years. Its title comes from a root plant indigenous to Appalachia, valued for its medicinal properties, that "presents a beautiful appearance when cut and placed under a microscope, seeming like an aggregation of minute precious stones." (- Joseph E. Meyers, "The Herbalist and Herb Doctor," 1918 - from the frontispiece)

An apt title, I think, especially in view of this aggregation of 36 moving and beautiful essays from a wide variety of writers, all of them about how their Appalachian experiences have shaped and influenced them, both as women and as artists and writers.

It would be nigh impossible, I think, to try to summarize or typify what's contained within these covers, so I'm not going to try. Instead I'll just share a few short samples.

Here's Jayne Anne Phillips, on the lives of some of the poorest families of her West Virginia town, kids she went to school with in 1962, when she was ten -

"... some of the mothers break down and take off, or they break down in a different way and go to the bars with the men. Then it's the older sisters waiting with the children, sisters who are not much older than me. Soon they'll quit school, if they haven't already, and be taken up by some man who probably already has a brood of kids. They'll live in a hollow like the one they grew up in, places with names like Mud Lick, Sago, Volga, a cluster of buildings around a coal tipple ..." ("Premature Burial"}

Or here's Virginia native Rita Sims Quillen on finding another family in fellow Appalachian writers who have encouraged and mentored her, folks like Jim Wayne Miller, Robert Morgan, Lee Smith and others -

"So I do have a tribe that I belong to, but they are with me only in spirit most of the time. I live and think and feel and write alone, as everyone ultimately must. I will persist in writing because it is the only way to get some peace, the only antidote to the mostly-manic-occasionally-depressive kind of mind I have. The white page is the safety valve on the bubbling steam of words and images fogging up my brain ... The constraints of being a woman who chose to be a wife and mother and writer must be acknowledged and accepted. It has become apparent to me that affirmation will never come from anywhere outside myself - not from my neighbors, not from the media, the literary establishment, or the academy. The person who will validate my experiences and affirm my words as a person and a writer is me. I know who I am, where I came from, and where I'm going." ("Counting the Sums"}

Now THAT is a powerful statement from a woman who's sorted it all out and has chosen to PERSIST with her writing.

And one more, from South Carolinian Bennie Lee Sinclair. This one hit home for me, making me remember myself nearly fifty years ago, with a brand new MA in English and a job at a community college, finally ready to begin my dream of being a writer, sitting down at a typewriter and finding I had nothing to say. A crushing experience. Here's what Sinclair remembers -

"I had been writing, and publishing, since first grade, but now that I had finally finished college and was ready to be a writer, I found myself at a stage of development no one had warned me of: I knew how to handle words fairly competently but as yet had nothing worthwhile to say. It was an astounding discovery, and very depressing. I kept on practicing but did not send things out for a long time." {"Appalachian Loaves and Fishes"}

I could go on, but I hope you get the idea. And I know these small samples are not necessarily about Appalachia, but most of these writers do get around to those influences in their contributions here.

Some of these writers I'd not heard of, but many I had, since they are successful poets and fiction writers, people like Gail Godwin, Lisa Alther, Nikki Giovanni, and Mary Lee Settle, just to name a few. And there is, too, editor Joyce Dyer's lovely and erudite Introduction. (And you must read Dyer's two beautiful memoirs, GUM-DIPPED: A DAUGHTER REMEMBERS RUBBER TOWN and GOOSETOWN: RECONSTRUCTING AN AKRON NEIGHBORHOOD.)

I have actually been sampling these stories over a span of several years now, and still have a few left to read, but thought it was time to get the word out, to share my enjoyment of these variously lovely and moving little pieces of Appalachian living and writing. I can't begin to tell you how much I admire these women. My highest recommendation.

- Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER
  • Chilele
It's amazing how much work the women in this collection have done, with so little national recognition. Dyer points out that none of them is represented in the new revision of "The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women," for example. Prejudices about Appalachia have prevented many readers from realizing what a gold mine (coal mine?) of literature the region offers. Hats off to Joyce Dyer for helping to bring this literature to the prominence it deserves. P.S. Also a very valuable read for anyone interested in writers and where writing comes from.
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