almediah.fr
» » Vessels of Meaning: Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence

Download Vessels of Meaning: Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence eBook

by Laura Fasick

Download Vessels of Meaning: Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence eBook
ISBN:
0875802214
Author:
Laura Fasick
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Northern Illinois University Press; 1 edition (April 1, 1997)
Pages:
241 pages
EPUB book:
1342 kb
FB2 book:
1361 kb
DJVU:
1331 kb
Other formats
txt lrf rtf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
370


Vessels of Meaning book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Vessels of Meaning book. Tracing the progression of images of women's bodies through nearly two.

Vessels of Meaning: Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence.

Fasick (English, Moorhead State . traces the progression of images of. .overview of class and gender relations as reflected in the English novel.

Vessels of Meaning : Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence. Fasick (English, Moorhead State . traces the progression of images of women's bodies through two centuries of English literature to construct a historical overview of class and gender relations as reflected in the English novel. She focuses on ways women have been depicted as possessing nurturing.

Vessels of Meaning: Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence

Vessels of Meaning: Women's Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence. Richardson himself in Pamela II, while not going so far as to revise Pamela's class origins, certainly did his best to obscure them; see Terry Castle, Masquerade and Civilization: The Carnivalesque in Eighteenth-Century English Culture and Fiction (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1986), 139-51. 8. "Critical Remarks on Sir Charles Grandison, Clarissa, and Pamela" (London: J. Dowse, 1754), 35. 9. I have selected the Fielding and Haywood fictions because they do not attempt to alter Pamela's class status or her gender.

Vessels of Meaning: Women’s Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence. Sex and Enlightenment: Women in Richardson and Diderot. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 1997.

English fiction History and criticism Women and literature Great Britain History Social classes in literature Human body in literature Sex .

English fiction History and criticism Women and literature Great Britain History Social classes in literature Human body in literature Sex role in literature. Download book Vessels of meaning : women's bodies, gender norms, and class bias from Richardson to Lawrence, Laura Fasick.

Charles Kingsley’s Scientific Treatment of Gender. -. Vessels of Meaning: Women’s Bodies, Gender Norms, and Class Bias from Richardson to Lawrence. DeKalb: Northern Illinois UP, 1997. Exiling the Encyclopedia: The Individual in ‘Janet’s Repentance. Nineteenth-Century Fiction 41 (1987): 419-41. The Essence of Christianity.

English fiction History and criticism Women and literature Great Britain History Social classes in literature Human body in literature Sex role . Download now Vessels of meaning : women's bodies, gender norms, and class bias from Richardson to Lawrence Laura Fasick. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. traces the progression of images of women's bodies through two centuries of English literature to construct a historical overview of class and gender relations as reflected in the English novel

Fasick (English, Moorhead State . Irish myths and legends. Jane Campbell, Naomi G. Lewis.

Tracing the progression of images of women's bodies through nearly two centuries of literature, Fasick analyzes selected novels from Samuel Richardson to D. H. Lawrence to construct a historical overview of class and gender relations as reflected and refracted in the pages of the English novel. Though recent discussion and women's roles in literature and culture has centered on women's sexuality as the defining factor in the female character, Fasick focuses instead on ways that writers have depicted women as possessing nurturing qualities that distinguish them from men. Rigid adherence to this idealization of femininity constructs a standard difficult for women to achieve. Held to the ideal, Fasick asserts, women appear grossly culpable rather than simply human. Fasick begins with an analysis of Samuel Richardson's novels that examines three linked themes: sensibility, maternity, and anorexia. She continues with a discussion of Frances Burney's treatment of the expressive female body. She then analyzes novels by Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Charlotte Bronte in light of Victorian attitudes toward women and food and toward female invalidism. In conclusion, she returns to Richardson, pairing his novel Pamela with Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover for an examination of cross-class romance and the resulting implications for class and gender. Throughout, references to conduct books and periodical literature of the time provide contexts that illuminate the primary texts. Fasick's insights will interest students of the novel, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century fiction, women's studies and gender studies, and class relations in literature.