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Download Structuralism in Literature; An Introduction eBook

by Robert Scholes

Download Structuralism in Literature; An Introduction eBook
ISBN:
0300017502
Author:
Robert Scholes
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yale Univ Pr; 3d ptg. edition (September 1, 1974)
Pages:
234 pages
EPUB book:
1765 kb
FB2 book:
1799 kb
DJVU:
1886 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
964


In STRUCTURALISM IN LITERATURE, Robert Scholes attempts to explain what structuralism is, how it originated, how it generally fits into the current literary scheme of things

In STRUCTURALISM IN LITERATURE, Robert Scholes attempts to explain what structuralism is, how it originated, how it generally fits into the current literary scheme of things. When this book was published in 1974, structuralism, even in its infancy, was fighting for space on the crowded stage of critical theory. Part of the problem that I had with Scholes' text is that he fails to come to the defense of a theory that even now has many supporters.

Scholes, Robert, 1929-. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Structuralism in Literature book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Structuralism in Literature: An Introduction as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Robert E. Scholes (1929-2016) was an American literary critic and theorist. Structuralism in Literature (1974). New Books: Modernism in the Magazines: An Introduction". Harper's Magazine Foundation. He is known for his ideas on fabulation and metafiction. He graduated from Yale University. From 1970 until his death in 2016, he was a Professor at Brown University. With Eric S. Rabkin, he published in 1977 the book Science Fiction: History, Science, Vision, which considerably influenced science fiction studies. Structural Fabulation: An Essay on Fiction of the Future (University of Notre Dame Press, 1975). Science fiction: history, science, vision.

Structuralism in Literature : An Introduction. From time to time a current of thought sweeps through a culture and moves its most disparate elements in the same direction. Such a current is structuralism. Reacting against "modernist" alienation and fragmentation, it is an integrative and holistic way of looking at the world; it seeks reality not in individual things but in the relationships among them.

Structuralism is a broad thoery. In literature, it gave birth to other theories like post-structuralism & deconstruction. Read the article on Structuralist theory and its literary implications by Alok Mishra.

Scholes, Robert, Structuralism in Literature: An Introduction (Yale University Press, 1974). Don't be put off by its age. You won't find anything to match it. Sturrock, John, Structuralism (Paladin, 1986). Chapter four is a good, succinct.

Robert Scholes (Structuralism in Literature), Colin MacCabe, Frank Kermode and David Lodge (combined traditional and structuralist approaches in his book Working with Structuralism).

Beginning with the trailblazers, Levi Strauss and Barthes, the other major practitioners include A. J. Greimas, Vladimir Propp, Terence Hawkes (Structuralism and Semiotics), Robert Scholes (Structuralism in Literature), Colin MacCabe, Frank Kermode and David Lodge (combined traditional and structuralist approaches in his book Working with Structuralism).

Scholes, Robert E. (1974). Structuralism in literature : an introduction. New Haven : Yale University Press. Book, Online - Google Books. Scholes, Robert E. Description. New Haven : Yale University Press, 1974 xii, 221 p. ; 22 cm. Structuralism in literature : an introduction, Robert Scholes Yale University Press New Haven 1974. Australian/Harvard Citation. 1974, Structuralism in literature : an introduction, Robert Scholes Yale University Press New Haven.

The nature and leading exponents of the structuralist movement are considered together with the structural poetics of fiction and drama
  • Kadar
Human beings have always sought for a large scale meaning to the universe and to themselves. In the sphere of language and literature, the search for an overall structure to explain how words on paper might similarly lead to collective meaning had resurfaced in the mid twentieth century following the dislocations of early modernistic thought that saw fragmentation as the philosophical order of the day. In STRUCTURALISM IN LITERATURE, Robert Scholes attempts to explain what structuralism is, how it originated, how it generally fits into the current literary scheme of things. When this book was published in 1974, structuralism, even in its infancy, was fighting for space on the crowded stage of critical theory. The interloper was Deconstructionism that under its founder Jacques Derrida turned the basic tenets of structuralism on its collective head by insisting that there were no large scale structures of language anywhere in the linguistic universe. Part of the problem that I had with Scholes' text is that he fails to come to the defense of a theory that even now has many supporters. Had he pointed out the many flaws in Derrida (as John Ellis succinctly does in his book AGAINST DECONSTRUCTION), then STRUCTURALISM IN LITERATURE might have been depicted as a system of analysis that is infinitely more sophisticated then Derrida has railed against. The subtitle of Scholes' book is AN INTRODUCTION. Usually any text that has that phrase in the title assumes that the reader has limited knowledge of the contents. In this case, one who comes to Scholes with minimal exposure to critical theory in general and structuralism in particular will find comprehension a tough grind. Scholes begins with a series of overly complex discussions of a number of structuralists, not all of whom are of the first rank. In his analyses of those who are, namely Saussure and Jakobson, he scants their contributions. What emerges from STRUCTURALISM IN LITERATURE is a text for the reasonably erudite in theory who wish explanations of theorists of the second rank that are not easily obtained elsewhere. For those who wish the basic principles of structuralism presented in jargon-free prose, one might turn to the guides written by Peter Barry or Lois Tyson. Scholes' book does have it uses but being a beginner text is not one of them.
  • Captain America
I just read this book. I was looking for a refresher on structuralism, which I had not paid much attention to for many years, and have recently been re-reading Derrida so wanted a little better background. I appreciate the other commenter's remarks on this book, but respectfully disagree. Although I do have a little background in the subject, it is written at an extremely introductory level -- if you are reading about structuralism at all, you are probably a pretty good reader already, even with new material. Nothing about structuralism is that hard, and most of the writing is fairly crisp, including the writing here. I thought Scholes was very fair to the partisans of Deconstruction, and I cannot agree that he limits his reviews to "second rate" thinkers. It's a short book, colored by some slightly outdated digressions and opinions, but provides a fine overview. You can read it in an afternoon, so long as you have plenty of coffee. It's 200 pages and gives a good historical as well as theoretical overview. In other words: in my opinion, it serves the purpose it was designed to serve.