almediah.fr
» » Vision and Disenchantment: Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads

Download Vision and Disenchantment: Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads eBook

by Heather Glen

Download Vision and Disenchantment: Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads eBook
ISBN:
0521250846
Author:
Heather Glen
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (July 29, 1983)
Pages:
408 pages
EPUB book:
1724 kb
FB2 book:
1860 kb
DJVU:
1572 kb
Other formats
txt lrf mbr lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
161


We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

Vision And Disenchantment book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Vision And Disenchantment book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Vision And Disenchantment: Blake's Songs And Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Blake's Innocence and Experience retraced. Glen, Heather (1983). Vision and Disenchantment:Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads. Cambridge University Press. London: Athlone Press.

Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience and Wordsworth's contributions to Lyrical Ballads . The similarities between the two collections have often been noticed.

Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience and Wordsworth's contributions to Lyrical Ballads were both published in the last decade of the eighteenth century. However, as Dr Glen argues, to assimilate both collections to a common 'Romanticism' is to obscure that which is most distinctive in each. Each was shaped by and responsive to very different social and cultural pressures in the England of its time and offers a very different vision of human possibility

Heather Glen, Vision and Disenchantment: Blake’s Songs and Wordsworth’s Lyrical Ballads, Cambridge . Sing now the lusty song of fruits and flowers.

Heather Glen, Vision and Disenchantment: Blake’s Songs and Wordsworth’s Lyrical Ballads, Cambridge University Press, 1983. Nelson Hilton (e., Essential Articles for the Study of William Blake, 1970–1984, Archon Books, 1986. E. D. Hirsch, Jr, Innocence and Experience: An Introduction to Blake, Yale University Press, 1964. Christopher Z. Hobson, Blake and Homosexuality, Palgrave Macmillan, 2000. The narrow bud opens her beauties to. ‘The sun, and love runs in her thrilling veins

Books by Heather Glen. Vision and Disenchantment: Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads (Cambridge Paperback Library).

Books by Heather Glen. Charlotte Brontë: The Imagination in History.

Heather Glen's Vision and Disenchantment: Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads argues that "Night" is an exploration of social anxiety. Society has "mutual reassurances," which provide comfort in worldly things and not Heaven or God. The wolves and tigers that appear at night threaten to disrupt the norms of society and create panic. She also mentions the concept of night being associated with faith.

The Wordsworth Circle. Volume 16, Number 4 Fall 1985. Member subscriptions. Recommend to your library.

Vision and disenchantment. Blake's Songs and Wordsworth's Lyrical ballads. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience and Wordsworth's contributions to Lyrical Ballads were both published in the last decade of the eighteenth century. The similarities between the two collections have often been noticed. However, as Dr Glen argues, to assimilate both collections to a common 'Romanticism' is to obscure that which is most distinctive in each. Each was shaped by and responsive to very different social and cultural pressures in the England of its time and offers a very different vision of human possibility. Moreover each poet uses the language which is the intimate register and vehicle of his society's experience in a very different way. This is a challenging and persuasive interpretation of poems too often seen as part of a coherent and accepted literary tradition: poems which present a continuing challenge to all who would explore possibilities for creative social change. It will be of great interest to all serious readers of Romantic poetry.