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Download Phrasikleia: An Anthropology of Reading in Ancient Greece (Myth and Poetics) eBook

by Janet Lloyd,Jesper Svenbro

Download Phrasikleia: An Anthropology of Reading in Ancient Greece (Myth and Poetics) eBook
ISBN:
0801425190
Author:
Janet Lloyd,Jesper Svenbro
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cornell University Press (April 26, 1993)
Pages:
240 pages
EPUB book:
1935 kb
FB2 book:
1469 kb
DJVU:
1526 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
849


by. Jesper Svenbro (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Jesper Svenbro (Author), Janet E. Lloyd (Translator), Janet Lloyd (Translator) & 0 more.

Translated from the French by JANET LLOYD. It is to be hoped that Janet Lloyd's fine translation of this 1988 book will bring Svenbro's work to a wider audience

Translated from the French by JANET LLOYD. Ithaca and Lon- don: Cornell University Press, 1993. Pp. xiv + 233; several figs. It is to be hoped that Janet Lloyd's fine translation of this 1988 book will bring Svenbro's work to a wider audience. 1 Phrasikleia continues . s interest, inspired by Eric Havelock, in how the modes of communication of pre-classical Greece were related.

Translated by Janet Lloyd. The first alphabetic writing in ancient Greece was a writing of proper names. Series: Myth and Poetics. Whether using practical or prestige objects, the writer appears to us first and foremost in the role of a name-giver (onomatothétēs): he attaches names, denoting the owners, craftsmen, donors, and addressees. Once committed to writing, those proper names sound forth each time a reader puts his voice at their service. In his book LaLoi à Rome,André Magdelain adopted the etymology of the Latin wordlexproposed by Michel Breal and Franz Skutsch:lexis the noun formed from the verblegerein the sense of ‘to read’.

First published in French in 1988, this extraordinary book traces the meaning and function of reading from its very beginnings in Greek oral culture through the development of silent reading.

Phrasikleia: An Anthropology of Reading in Ancient Greece. a b Svenbro, Jesper. Phrasikleia: an anthropology of reading in ancient Greece. Cornell University Press, 1993. p. 12. ^ Svenbro, Jesper. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1993, p. 12, 13. ^ a b c d e Photo courtesy of Brigid Powers 2017, from Gods in Color, San Francisco. Cornell University Press, Ithaca 1993, ISBN 0-8014-9752-3.

Silent reading in antiquity. Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 9:421–35. Lakoff, Robin (1977). Thomas, Rosalind (1992). Literacy and orality in Ancient Greece. Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press. Ong, Walter J. (1981). Fighting for life: Contest, sexuality and consciousness. lthaca, NY: Cornell University Press. Recommend this journal.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Carthage and Rome: Introduction. The Pupula Duplex and Other Tokens of an "Evil Eye" in the Light of Ophthalmology. Hercules, Mummius, and the Roman Triumph in Aeneid 8. Loar. The Date of Composition of Caesar's Gallic War.

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Phrasikleia: An Anthropology of Reading in Ancient Greece (Myth and Poetics). What I took away from this book: A lot of modern theorists on reading in the modern and ancient world want to view the act, process and social position of reading from a modern position. 0801497523 (ISBN13: 9780801497520). What Svenbro manages in this volume is to make clear just how different the social position of reading was in ancient Greece.

Here they provide a disturbing and decidedly nonclassical reading of Greek myth and tragedy and the relationship between them. Jean-Pierre Vernant is Professor Emeritus of Comparative Study of Ancient Religions at the College de France in Paris. Pierre Vidal-Naquet is Director of Studies and Professor of Sociology at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris.

First published in French in 1988, this extraordinary book traces the meaning and function of reading from its very beginnings in Greek oral culture through the development of silent reading.

One of the most haunting early examples of Greek alphabetical writing appears on the life-sized Archaic funerary statue of a young girl. The inscription speaks for Phrasikleia, who "shall always be called maiden," for she has received this name from the gods instead of marriage.