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Download Burroughs Live: The Collected Interview of Wiliam S. Burroughs, 1960-1997 (Double Agents) eBook

by William S. Burroughs,Sylvere Lotringer,Sylvère Lotringer

Download Burroughs Live: The Collected Interview of Wiliam S. Burroughs, 1960-1997 (Double Agents) eBook
ISBN:
1584350105
Author:
William S. Burroughs,Sylvere Lotringer,Sylvère Lotringer
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Semiotext(e); First Edition edition (December 1, 2000)
Pages:
675 pages
EPUB book:
1536 kb
FB2 book:
1166 kb
DJVU:
1128 kb
Other formats
lit docx lrf doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
397


For a man who hated interviews, William Burroughs (1914-1997) ended up doing quite a few of them over 30-plus years, appearing in print everywhere from Mademoiselle to Semiotext(e).

For a man who hated interviews, William Burroughs (1914-1997) ended up doing quite a few of them over 30-plus years, appearing in print everywhere from Mademoiselle to Semiotext(e). This massive collection includes published as well as unpublished interviews with Burroughs and transcripts of conversations with celebrities like Tennessee Williams and David Bowie. For the most part, the material is arranged geographically and chronologically.

Burroughs Live: The Collected Interview of Wiliam S. Burroughs, 1960-1997 (Double Agents). From hipster to so-called Godfather of Punk, William Burroughs has lived a controversial life as a leading member of the Beat Generation and a daring writer of psychedelic literary experiments, but, when he reached his seventieth birthday in 1984, it was almost as if he had been overtaken by respectability. Burroughs was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1914 as the grandson of the man who invented the adding machine and a descendant of Robert E. Lee of Civil War fame. He attended Harvard University.

Burroughs Live: The Collected Interviews, 1960-1997. In this dazzling dialogue with Sylvere Lotringer, Paul Virilio for the first time displayed the whole range of his reflections on the effect of speed on our civilizati. The Politics of Truth

Burroughs Live: The Collected Interviews, 1960-1997. by William S. Burroughs · Sylvère Lotringer. The Politics of Truth. by Michel Foucault · Sylvère Lotringer · John Rajchman.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Burroughs Live: The Collected Interviews, 1960-1997 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Foucault Live: Interviews, 1961-84. Michel Foucault and Sylvere Lotringer. William S. Burroughs. Schizo-culture: The Event, the Book (2x Book Set in Slipcase). The German Issue (Semiotext(e), Foreign Agents). Burroughs' "the Revised Boy Scout Manual": An Electronic Revolution.

The Collected Interviews of William S. Burroughs, Cambridge : Semiotext(e), 2002. Lotringer, Sylvère and Smith, Jack: "Uncle Fishook and the Sacred Baby Poo-poo of Art", in SchizoCulture, Semiotexte ed. III, 2, 1978. French Theory in America, New York, Routledge, 2001. Nancy Spero, London: Phaedon Press, 1996.

Title: Burroughs Live Item Condition: New. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. Books will be free of page markings. Illuminating many aspects of his work and many facets of his mind, it brings out his scathing humor,powerful intelligence, and nightmarish vision.

Burroughs Live gathers all the interviews, both published and unpublished . Place of Publication. Semiotext (E), Native Agents.

Burroughs Live gathers all the interviews, both published and unpublished, given by William Burroughs, as well as conversations with well-kwn writers, artists, and musicians such as Tenessee Williams, Timothy Leary, Patti Smith, Keith Richards, Allen Ginsberg, Brion Gysin, and Gregory Corso. Illuminating many aspects of his work and many facets of his mind, it brings out his scathing humor, powerful intelligence, and nightmarish vision. Interest Age. From 18.

Burroughs Live gathers all the interviews, both published and unpublished, given by William Burroughs, as well as conversations with well-known writers, artists, and musicians such as Tennessee Williams, Timothy Leary, Patti Smith, Keith Richards, Allen Ginsberg, Brion Gysin, and Gregory Corso.

Burroughs Live gathers all the interviews, both published and unpublished, given by William Burroughs, as well as conversations with well-known writers, artists, and musicians such as Tennessee Williams, Timothy Leary, Patti Smith, Keith Richards, Allen Ginsberg, Brion Gysin, and Gregory Corso. The book provides a fascinating account of Burroughs's life as a literary outlaw. Illuminating many aspects of his work and many facets of his mind, it brings out his scathing humor, powerful intelligence, and nightmarish vision.

  • Timberahue
I've read some critics were people say there are some editing flaws. I'm just gonna say that having all the interviews collected worths every possible flaw.
  • Hellmaster
Wow, this book is enormous... but finishing it was not at all exhausting. Burroughs discusses a seemingly unlimited range of topics and ideas including conspiracies, state authority, language and the "word virus" theory, magic, Brion Gysin and the dream machine, cut-ups, astral projection, punks, the Beatniks, his books, various drugs, drug laws, and plenty more. Reading the interviews is an unbeatable way to get insight into this fascinating man, and to see the transitions he went through in his life. In his old age he seemed to have transformed into such a sweet and compassionate individual, and it is really very beautiful to hear the things he had to say by this time.

Many of the ideas that are undercurrents throughout his books are discussed in a straightforward, and casual manner in these interviews. This makes the book a very interesting supplement for avid Burroughs fans, and it reveals how amazingly insightful he was. At first I was a bit surprised that this book is published by Semiotext(e), whose books are consistently amazing and thought provoking (not that I didn't think his work is worthy, but the publisher usually puts out books of serious academic philosophy and political theory, while Burroughs is predominantly a novelist)... the connection became very clear while reading the interviews, especially the one in which Burroughs and many renowned French postmodern philosophers were in a conference together, including Deleuze and Foucault. In the interview based on this conference, many of their similarities are exposed. After reading this book, it became very apparent how far ahead Burroughs was from Foucault (a highly influential philosopher who examined power relations and how knowledge is tied to control), and how well their work ties together. Burroughs was always suspicious of power and deeply analyzed power relations and state authority, but his views were always freshly presented with a twist of his unique character, which makes his interviews an amusing read.

Some of them are a bit dry, and there is some repetition throughout the book... after all, they were never meant to be collected together. I wouldn't cut any of them, why opt for less when you could simply skip them? This is a nice book to own, because you can easily come to it at any time and read a single interview, but it really is amazing to read the whole thing front to back. Gives a different feeling than reading them sporadically.
  • Beahelm
I am hesitant ot give this a full five stars, despite being one of the most read books in my library.
Naturally this is a wonderfull collection of interiews of Mr Burroughs. And unlike "From the Bunker" this is every single one. This is not a best of, nor just a sample, this is it. And it's there that it becomes a little... too much. Reading the entire book cover to cover is no simple task, as Burroughs, naturally, repeats himself time and time again. Some interviews seem to be the same, and I find myself screaming: "I KNOW, you've said this allready"

That being said, it IS interesting to note how he over the years contradicts himself, often seeming more interested in overpowering the interviewer with his brilliance, than being truthfull.

I think it is more helpfull to look at this book as a reference book, than a good read.

If you want to be entertained and taught by Burroughs, I would rather reccoment "From the Bunker" and "The Job" as they function more as works in themselves. Read THIS entire book, and you feel you never wanna see the man again, as you've had your fill. There is such a thing as too much of a good thing...
  • Gavinranadar
In these one-on-one situations, Burroughs has a voice that is often quite different from the ones he uses in his writing. In particular, he appears to be genuinely open.

And after nearly 800 pages of "openness,' one is left with a deep sense of Burroughs' intellectual landscape... But oddly, not as strong of a sense of how he approaches his craft.

This has almost everything to do with his interviewers, the bulk of whom seem more interested in talking to The Legend rather than The Writer. After a while, these interviews start to read like attempts to commune with The Wise Old Cracker Barrel Sage On The Mountain, rather than attempts to reveal the creative processes behind an often brilliant writer.

This is especially evident when one reads interviews by J.E. Rivers and Jennie Skerl, which are actually NOT included in this book for some odd reason. Those interviewers are focused almost exclusively on getting Burroughs to talk about his WORK, and they are among the best interviews of him that are available. It's hard to fault "Burroughs Live" for being an incomplete endeavor, but these particular omissions are inexcusable (to read those particular interviews, you'll have to get Hibbard's "Conversations with...")

There are, however, many, many more insights that will amuse, engage and surprise the Burroughs scholar (and who else would read a bookof interviews THIS size?). During one early interview, for example, Burroughs dismisses the infamous "William Tell Routine" as an ugly rumour. This either casts a doubt over everything else he has to say, or fits in quite nicely with his vaudevillian huckster persona, depending on how you choose to proceed.

Obviously in a book this size, there are themes and ideas that are repeated from one interview to another... some ad nauseum. That helps to seperate Burroughs' actual infatuations from his transient interests, and provides some good context for reading his books. There are some, however, who will wish the editor had made some actual editorial judgements in this regard, which is a valid criticism.

Burroughs always appeared inaccessible while he was alive, but that was apparently not the case. It looks like he would talk to just about anyone who claimed to represent a journal of some kind, which makes me wish I had joined my college newspaper (which, by the way, had more thorough proofreaders than this book.)