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Download The Long-Winded Lady: Notes from the New Yorker eBook

by Maeve Brennan

Download The Long-Winded Lady: Notes from the New Yorker eBook
ISBN:
0395893631
Author:
Maeve Brennan
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mariner Books; 1 edition (November 2, 1998)
Pages:
268 pages
EPUB book:
1289 kb
FB2 book:
1916 kb
DJVU:
1735 kb
Other formats
mobi lit mobi azw
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
670


The Long-Winded Lady notes that her coffee ice cream arrives just as the .

The Long-Winded Lady notes that her coffee ice cream arrives just as the ambulance pulls up. Later that night, she hopes that the dead woman had no one belonging to her who loved her enough to grieve for years. Maeve Brennan was born on January 6, 1917, in a house close to Eccles Street-the street where James Joyce’s Leopold Bloom lived. Brennan returns to that house often in her writing.

The Long-Winded Lady: Notes from The New Yorker. Discover a vivid, atmospheric portrait of mid-century Manhattan with this collection of Talk of the Town pieces from the pages of The New Yorker. During the 1950s and 1960s, Maeve Brennan contributed numerous vignettes to the New Yorker’s Talk of the Town department, under the pen name The Long-Winded Lady.

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The Long-Winded Lady book. From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan contributed to "The New Yorker's" "Talk of the Town" department under the pen name "the long-winded lady.

The Long-winded Lady: No. .has been added to your Cart. Maeve Brennan left Ireland for American in 1934, when she was seventeen. Maeve Brennan died in 1993 at the age of seventy-six.

org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

org to approved e-mail addresses. You may be interested in. An Angle on the World: Dispatches and Diversions from the New Yorker and Beyond. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Looking Glass War.

Our 'Postscript' adds nine 'long-winded lady' items to Maeve Brennan's original selection of forty-seven . First published in 1969, The Long-Winded Lady is a celebration of one of The New Yorker's finest writers at the height of her power. -Publisher's note "Of all the incomparable stable of journalists who wrote for The New Yorker during its glory days in the Fifties and Sixties," writes The Independent, "the most distinctive was Irish-born Maeve Brennan. From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan wrote for The New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" column under the pen name "The Long-Winded Lady.

Bibliographic Details. Title: The Long-Winded Lady: Notes from The New. From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan wrote for The New Yorker’s Talk of the Town department under the pen name The Long-Winded Lady. Publisher: Counterpoint. Publication Date: 2009. Book Condition: Good. Synopsis: From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan wrote for The New Yorker’s Talk of the Town department under the pen name The Long-Winded Lady

From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan wrote for The New Yorker's Talk of the Town column under the pen name The Long-Winded Lady.

From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan wrote for The New Yorker's Talk of the Town column under the pen name The Long-Winded Lady. Her unforgettable sketchesprose snapshots of life in small restaurants, cheap hotels, and crowded streets of Times Square and the Villagetogether form a timeless, bittersweet tribute to what she called the most reckless, most ambitious, most confused, most comical, the saddest and coldest and most human of cities.

From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan contributed to The New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" department under the pen name "the long-winded lady

From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan contributed to The New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" department under the pen name "the long-winded lady. Her unforgettable sketches - prose snapshots of life in the streets, diners, and cheap hotels just off Times Square - are a timeless, bittersweet tribute to what she calls the "most ambitious, most comical. the saddest and coldest and most human of cities.

From 1954 to 1981, Maeve Brennan contributed to The New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" department under the pen name "the long-winded lady." Her unforgettable sketches - prose snapshots of life in the streets, diners, and cheap hotels just off Times Square - are a timeless, bittersweet tribute to what she calls the "most ambitious, most comical . . . the saddest and coldest and most human of cities."
  • Sirara
Just pitch-perfect snapshots of a time and place...observations of very ordinary (but fascinating) things in NYC in the 50s and 60s, in a beguiling tone that anyone familiar with journalism from that era will immediately recognize. I was saddened to later read how Brennan's life ended...there is a definitely a note of loneliness in these essays...but they are marvelous to read. A must for those interested in NYC social history.

SIDENOTE...in one essay was delighted to read she was living at Beaux Arts Hotel....which is where I live now (it converted long ago to rental apts).
  • Foxanayn
But rather almost a saint of observation, wit, integrity to her senses, and always, despite her joy in New York, a sadness infusing the joy. I know no other writer who so weds us to precise scenes and people yet pervades all in a razor sharp combination of the particular and the universal
There is no writer to equal Maeve.
  • Cashoutmaster
This woman teaches you how to sit and observe. No other writer used her time so well and got so much out of such seemingly innocuous moments. Read this and learn to observe. And yes, you will wonder and fret a bit about her mental health. It was delicate. In the end, sadly, it failed her. But whooowheee, the woman could write.
  • Tuliancel
I looked forward to reading this collection of Brennan's New Yorker pieces but have mixed feelings about it. In dozens of short articles, Brennan acts as a sort of sophisticated voyeur, offering detailed observations about personal interactions in the restaurants, hotels, stores and streets of 1950's and 60's Manhattan. She's often perched nearby or gazing through a window witnessing lovers' quarrels, street protests, accidents, traffic patterns - both the drama and minutiae of city life.

There's no question Brennan has a keen eye and an ability to capture interesting details about the people she observes. She has a crisp, clear writing style that makes the stories engaging to read. I think, however, that these stories probably worked better as occasional reads in the New Yorker. Reading one after another in this collection, they started to seem monotonous. Brennan is very detached, never makes judgments about what she's witnessing, and we never learn what really happened or what ultimately happens to the people observed from afar. For me, it seemed like such ephemeral incidents resulted in ephemeral writing.

Writers I respect, like Emma Donoghue and Nicholson Baker, really admire Brennan, so I'm going to follow up at some point with one of her short story collections. She has a sharp mind and she's a good wordsmith. I look forward to seeing what she does with a little more character and plotting.
  • Voodoolkree
Maeve Brennan is a writer who deserves more attention. Her pieces for The New Yorker are original, humane, witty and honest. Maeve lived life on her own terms, and was a brave woman. This collection also captures her insightful take on NYC.
  • Zinnthi
I loved reading this book, not only for inspiration as a writer, but as a tourist in a city I've never seen. Brennan brings the city to life not only as a place to be seen, but as a living and breathing organism with a definite personality and wild characters. This is one that will impact my work forever.
  • lolike
Great read - glad I ordered it!
i want to live at the etoile forevs