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by Sue Prideaux

Download Strindberg: A Life eBook
ISBN:
0300136935
Author:
Sue Prideaux
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yale University Press; First Edition edition (June 19, 2012)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1904 kb
FB2 book:
1446 kb
DJVU:
1741 kb
Other formats
rtf txt lrf mobi
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
967


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Novelist, satirist, poet, photographer, painter, alchemist, and hellraiser-August Strindberg was all these.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Sue Prideaux opens her biography of August Strindberg, published to coincide with the 100th anniversary of his death this year and which is longlisted for the Samuel Johnson prize, with the genesis of his most famous play, Miss Julie. Early in 1888, Strindberg, his first wife Siri, and their three young children were staying in a Copenhagen hotel they could not afford for the premiere of his play The Father.

Yes, I’ve not long finished Strindberg: a Life by Sue Prideaux. Published in this centenary year of his death, it’s the first full biography in English of the Swedish literary giant for thirty years. Actually, while he is best known as a playwright and theatrical innovator, it’s almost impossible to pinpoint Strindberg, a man of restless and towering temperament. The dramatist was also a novelist, an essayist, a journalist, a photographer, a horticulturalist, a poet, an occultist, a historian and a painter.

Strindberg a Life wins the Duff Cooper Prize for non-fiction . Assorted book jackets. SP and Karl Ove Knausgaard in conversation at the British Museum, 10th May 2019.

Strindberg a Life wins the Duff Cooper Prize for non-fiction, shortlisted for the Sam Johnson & the Sheridan Morley. com/watch?v ssgDsIm2dhA. While Sue Prideaux was writing Edvard Munch: Behind the Scream she became increasingly fascinated by Munch’s friend August Strindberg. Winner of the Duff Cooper Prize and shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize.

Intense: August Strindberg in 1891 (Strindberg Museum, Stockholm). August Strindberg’s first misfortune was being born Swedish

Intense: August Strindberg in 1891 (Strindberg Museum, Stockholm). August Strindberg’s first misfortune was being born Swedish. As Sue Prideaux points out in this rich and absorbing biography, Sweden had lost its great empire in the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars, and at the time of Strindberg’s birth in 1849 it was a shrunken, backward nation. For a writer, a worse handicap was that almost nobody except the Swedes understood Swedish. This disadvantage has, Prideaux argues, continued to mask Strindberg’s true stature.

Novelist, satirist, poet, photographer, painter, alchemist, and hellraiser August Strindberg was all these, and yet he is principally known, in Arthur Miller's words, as "the mad inventor of modern theater" who led playwriting out of the polite drawing room into the snakepit of psychological warfare.

Sue Prideaux is an Anglo-Norwegian writer. Her grandmother was muse to the explorer Roald Amundsen and her godmother was painted by Edvard Munch, whose biography she later wrote under the title Edvard Munch: Behind the Scream

Sue Prideaux is an Anglo-Norwegian writer. Her grandmother was muse to the explorer Roald Amundsen and her godmother was painted by Edvard Munch, whose biography she later wrote under the title Edvard Munch: Behind the Scream. 2005 James Tait Black Memorial Prize Munch. 2012 Samuel Johnson Prize, shortlist, Strindberg. 2012 Duff Cooper Prize Strindberg. 2019 Hawthornden Prize Nietzsche. Rude mechanicals, Abacus, 1997. Magnetic North, Little, Brown, 1998.

Strindberg knew an awful lot of artists. I’ll confine my answer to a few. Strindberg and Edvard Munch were inseparable friends during the time Munch was planning and painting the Scream. Strindberg’s then-revolutionary idea that Chance should be allowed to play a role in artistic creation loosened up Munch’s work to embrace random happenings.

Novelist, satirist, poet, photographer, painter, alchemist, and hellraiser—August Strindberg was all these, and yet he is principally known, in Arthur Miller's words, as "the mad inventor of modern theater" who led playwriting out of the polite drawing room into the snakepit of psychological warfare. This biography, supported by extensive new research, describes the eventful and complicated life of one of the great literary figures in world literature. Sue Prideaux organizes Strindberg's story into a gripping and highly readable narrative that both illuminates his work and restores humor and humanity to a man often shrugged off as too difficult.

Best known for his play Miss Julie, Strindberg wrote sixty other plays, three books of poetry, eighteen novels, and nine autobiographies. Even more than most, Strindberg is a writer whose life sheds invaluable light on his work. Prideaux explores Strindberg's many art-life connections, revealing for the first time the originals who inspired the characters of Miss Julie and her servant Jean, the bizarre circumstances in which the play was written, and the real suicide that inspired the shattering ending of the play. Recounting the playwright's journey through the "real" world as well as the world of belief and ideas, Prideaux marks the centenary of Strindberg's death in 1912 with a biography worthy of the man who laid the foundation for Western drama through the twentieth century and even into the twenty-first.

  • Cenneel
Superbly written. A balanced account. One gets a real sense of who the man was and the struggles he encountered. The book has led me to begin reading Strindberg's plays.
  • Meri
Great insights to this insane, robust, erratic playwright. What a mind and what a lesson for anyone studying theatre arts.
  • Konetav
I had hoped that this book would supersede the standard biography of Strindberg by Michael Meyer (1986), which is hugely informative, but gets rather bogged down in secondary details, and irritates me by its frequent disparaging remarks about Strindberg's novels and autobiographies, which I hugely admire; if you really think that Strindberg is at his best only in a few plays, why write about him? However, this new life by Prideaux doesn't directly compete with Meyer, because it is in a quite different genre - that of the racy popular biography. Yes, it `reads like a novel'. As such, it will meet the tastes of most readers much better than Meyer's. But there is a downside. The writing is flashy, full of vivid little details, out of the writer's head, to bring the page alive. But such details are in danger of being misleading or hackneyed. Prideaux describes the Pietist preachers of the Stockholm of Strindberg's youth as `rabble-rousing', presumably because this is the word in her vocabulary to describe dissenting preachers. Novelists are not historians, and so we have the statement that `the land on which St Petersburg stands' was Swedish territory down to 1809 (how can the reader of the Yale University Press have let this through?). And Voltaire is said to have written a life of Charles XII of Sweden because he so admired him, when in fact the work is a brilliant hatchet-job; but for Prideaux, to write a biography and admire its subject are two ideas automatically connected. Accuracy improves when she gets on to Strindberg, though I would trust Meyer more for the facts, and he gives many more of them. But in a popular biography none of this matters. For this remains a hugely readable book, which brings out vividly Strindberg's bizarre and tragic personality and many episodes of his life. Well done to Sue Prideaux for drawing him to the attention of today's readers! In the centenary year of his death this is just the book to read. - And having read it, I would urge you to proceed to Strindberg's own `The Son of a Servant', one of the great autobiographies.