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Download The Poet as Mythmaker: A Study of Symbolic Meaning in Taras Ševčenko (Harvard Series in Ukrainian Studies) eBook

by George G. Grabowicz

Download The Poet as Mythmaker: A Study of Symbolic Meaning in Taras Ševčenko (Harvard Series in Ukrainian Studies) eBook
ISBN:
0674678524
Author:
George G. Grabowicz
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute; First Edition edition (August 17, 1982)
Pages:
186 pages
EPUB book:
1480 kb
FB2 book:
1958 kb
DJVU:
1545 kb
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
230


The Poet as Mythmaker not only changes that, but also performs the task magisterially.

Series: Harvard Series in Ukrainian Studies (Book 41). Hardcover: 186 pages. Taras Sevcenko (1814-1861) has been variously described as: greatest poet of Ukraine, great literary genius, national prophet, revolutionary democrat, national bard of Ukraine, the enthusiast, and the spiritual father of the reborn Ukrainian nation. The Poet as Mythmaker not only changes that, but also performs the task magisterially.

The Poet as Mythmaker book. The Poet as Mythmaker: A Study of Symbolic Meaning in Taras Sevčenko. by. George G. Grabowicz. Taras Sevčenko (1814-1861) is the central figure in modern Ukrainian literature, but despite the enormous attention that has been devoted to his person, his work, and his role in Ukrainian history and the Ukrainian national renascence, the core of the Sevčenko phenomenon-the symbolic nature of his poetry-has received little systematic analysis.

Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861) is the central figure in modern Ukrainian literature, and accordingly enormous attention has been devoted to his person, his work, and his role in Ukrainian history and the Ukrainian renaissance of the 19th century. In The Poet as Mythmaker, Grabowicz explores a hitherto ignored, yet vital part of the Shevchenko phenomenon: the symbolic nature of Shevchenko's poetry. According to Grabowicz's new analysis, myth serves as the underlying code and model of Shevchenko's universe.

Distributed by Harvard University Press. Recommend this journal. Larissa M. L. Onyshkevych (a1).

As Professor Grabowicz indicates, the manifest genius of the Ukraine's national bard has too long been obscured by the tendency of Ukrainian exegetes to render him the mouthpiece of their respective ideologies.

1 HARVARD UKRAINIAN STUDIES Volume VI Number 4 December 1982 . c Drevnie i nyneśnie Bolgare, vol. 1 (Moscow, 1829)

c Drevnie i nyneśnie Bolgare, vol. 1 (Moscow, 1829).

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The Poet as Mythmaker: A Study of Symbolic Meaning in Taras Ševčenko Monograph Series by George G. Grabowicz (pp. 533-536).

Material type: TextSeries: Monograph series. Publisher: Cambridge : Harvard University Press, 1982. Description: X, 170 p. 24 c. SBN: 0-674-678-52-4. Subject(s): Shevchenko, Taras 1814-1861

Material type: TextSeries: Monograph series. Subject(s): Shevchenko, Taras 1814-1861.

Taras Ševčenko (1814–1861) is the central figure in modern Ukrainian literature, but despite the enormous attention that has been devoted to his person, his work, and his role in Ukrainian history and the Ukrainian national renascence, the core of the Ševčenko phenomenon―the symbolic nature of his poetry―has received little systematic analysis.

As this book argues, myth serves as the underlying code and model of Ševčenko’s poetic universe. Examining the structures and paradigms of Ševčenko’s mythical thought provides answers for various crucial and heretofore intractable questions, such as those concerning the relation of his Ukrainian poetry to his Russian prose, his sense of a transcendent “curse” and “guilt” in the Ukrainian past and present, the interrelation of his revolutionist fervor with his apparent providentialism, or of the tension between the nativism and the universalism of his poetry.

Moreover, it is through the structures of his mythical thought that we can understand Ševčenko’s “prophecy,” in effect, his millenarian vision. In this framework, too, the author focuses on the religious tenor of Ševčenko’s poetry, in which he is both expiator and carrier of the Word, and, finally, on the reception―indeed the cult of Ševčenko among generations of Ukrainians.