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Download Seducing the Eighteenth-Century French Reader: Reading, Writing, and the Question of Pleasure eBook

by Paul J. Young

Download Seducing the Eighteenth-Century French Reader: Reading, Writing, and the Question of Pleasure eBook
ISBN:
0754664171
Author:
Paul J. Young
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (September 28, 2008)
Pages:
174 pages
EPUB book:
1726 kb
FB2 book:
1618 kb
DJVU:
1116 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
317


As he demonstrates that narratives of seduction function as a master plot for French literature in the eighteenth century, Paul Young argues that the prevalence of this trope was a reaction to a dominant cultural discourse that coded the novel and the new practice of solitary reading a. .

As he demonstrates that narratives of seduction function as a master plot for French literature in the eighteenth century, Paul Young argues that the prevalence of this trope was a reaction to a dominant cultural discourse that coded the novel and the new practice of solitary reading as dangerous, seductive practices.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Seducing the Eighteenth-Century French Reader: Reading, Writing, and the Question of Pleasure as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This well-written and nuanced book connects aptly the erotic novels of the .

This well-written and nuanced book connects aptly the erotic novels of the eighteenth century with the rest of the more well-known novelistic corpus. The author provides the tools to read these novels in the context of a homogeneous repressive culture and of institutions that organized to stifle them. More specifically, Young manages to show how writing for these authors emerges as a place of affirmation and pleasure, and imagination. Eighteenth-Century Fiction . ffers subtle and illuminating readings of some of its canonical and less well-known primary sources. Journal of Eighteenth-Century Studies.

Reading, Writing, and the Question of Pleasure. Books related to Seducing the Eighteenth-Century French Reader. Ultimately, Young argues, the seduction not in the text, but by the text raises questions about the nature of pleasure in eighteenth-century French literature and culture.

As he demonstrates that narratives of seduction function as a master plot for French literature in the eighteenth century, Paul Young argues that the prevalence of this trope was a reaction to a dominant cultural discourse that coded the novel and the new practice of solitary reading a.

Young introduces this notion that combines pleasure with responsibility and intellect, in other words a superior form of pleasure.

Paul J. Young que je désirais; c’était cabinet, architecture had become an important motif in eighteenth-century French literature, and space, as Denon’s tale demonstrates, was often pressed into the service of eroticism. Young introduces this notion that combines pleasure with responsibility and intellect, in other words a superior form of pleasure.

The books in the How to Read don't claim to tell you all you need to know. Seducing the Eighteenth-century French Reader: Reading, Writing, and the. Instead they offer a refreshing set of first-hand meetings with those minds. Our hope is that these books will instruct, intrigue, embolden, encourage and delight. subversive depiction of human sexuality, and the philosophical and political thinking that underpins it. He shows how, though Sade's work continues to shock, it can also be seen as the logical conclusion of eighteenth-century materialism.

Late in the eighteenth century bluestocking writers published books on.In assessing what reading and writing pedagogy are for, age, gender and occupation could be additional factors for consideration.

Late in the eighteenth century bluestocking writers published books on the education of girls. The bluestockings were an intellectual network of women authors and artists who engaged publicly in the literary sphere in the mid to late eighteenth century. He considered the larger audience of readership as a force of social improvement more than his own individual improvement. Young is assistant professor of French at Georgetown University . offers subtle and illuminating readings o. The author provides the tools to read these novels in the context of a homogeneous repressive culture and of institutions that organized to stifle them offers subtle and illuminating readings of some of its canonical and less well-known primary sources. Recommend to Librarian.

As he demonstrates that narratives of seduction function as a master plot for French literature in the eighteenth century, Paul Young argues that the prevalence of this trope was a reaction to a dominant cultural discourse that coded the novel and the new practice of solitary reading as dangerous, seductive practices. Situating his study in the context of paintings, educational manuals, and criticism that caution against the act of reading, Young considers both canonical and lesser-known works by authors that include Rousseau, Sade, Bastide, Laclos, Crébillon fils, and the writers of two widely read libertine novels. How these authors responded to a cultural climate that viewed literature, and especially the novel, as seductive, sheds light on the perils and pleasures of authorship, the ways in which texts interact with the larger cultural discourse, and what eighteenth-century texts tell us about the dangers of reading or writing. Ultimately, Young argues, the seduction not in the text, but by the text raises questions about the nature of pleasure in eighteenth-century French literature and culture.