almediah.fr
» » The Story Girl

Download The Story Girl eBook

by Lucy Maud Montgomery,1stworld Library

Download The Story Girl eBook
ISBN:
1421843005
Author:
Lucy Maud Montgomery,1stworld Library
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
1st World Library - Literary Society (June 15, 2007)
Pages:
316 pages
EPUB book:
1613 kb
FB2 book:
1325 kb
DJVU:
1246 kb
Other formats
lit lrf lrf docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
771


Lucy Maud Montgomery OBE (November 30, 1874 – April 24, 1942), published as L. M. Montgomery, was a Canadian author best known for a series of novels beginning in 1908 with Anne of Green Gables. The book was an immediate success

Lucy Maud Montgomery OBE (November 30, 1874 – April 24, 1942), published as L. The book was an immediate success. Anne Shirley, an orphaned girl, made Montgomery famous in her lifetime and gave her an international following. The first novel was followed by a series of sequels with Anne as the central character

The Story Girl said that once upon a time.

The Story Girl said that once upon a time. Felix and I, on the May morning when we left Toronto for Prince Edward Island, had not then heard her say it, and, indeed, were but barely aware of the existence of such a person as the Story Girl. We did not know her at all under that name. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery, famous for her "Anne of Green Gables" novels, had other novels that are well worth reading. One of them is "The Story Girl", which follows the adventures of a group of young cousins and their friends during a long summer on turn-of-the-century Prince Edward Island, Canada, Montgomery's birthplace and the setting of many of her stories. Montgomery modeled the leading character on herself at that age.

The Story Girl By Lucy Maud Montgomery. Chapter VI the mystery of golden milestone. Chapter XXII the dream books. Chapter XXIII such stuff as dreams are made on. Chapter VII how betty sherman won a husband. Chapter XXIV the bewitchment of pat.

Lucy Maud Montgomery. The Story Girl said that once upon a time. Felix and I, on the May morning when we left Toronto for Prince Edward Island, had not then heard her say it, and, indeed, were but barely aware of the existence of such a person as the Story Girl

Lucy Maud Montgomery. She was a form of life and light. We knew only that a cousin, Sara Stanley, whose mother, our Aunt Felicity, was dead, was living down on the Island with Uncle Roger and Aunt Olivia King, on a farm adjoining the old King homestead in Carlisle.

More books by Lucy Maud Montgomery. More books by 1stworld Library. During checkout we will give you a cumulative estimated date for delivery. Each additional book. Average Delivery Time. UK Standard Delivery. I wonder if the Story Girl is pretty," said Felix aloud. No, she isn't," said Dan instantly, from across the room. But you'll think she is while she's talking to you.

Lucy Maud Montgomery was born at Clifton (now New London), Prince Edward Island, Canada, on November 30, 1874. Best known for her Anne of Green Gables books, she was also a prolific writer of short stories and poetry. She achieved international fame in her lifetime, putting Prince Edward Island and Canada on the world literary map. She published some 500 short stories and poems and twenty novels before her death in 1942. Books by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Lucy Maud Montgomery.

Books Arts Kids and Family Story Girl Lucy Maud Montgomery Children Fiction War Stories Loyalbooks

Books Arts Kids and Family Story Girl Lucy Maud Montgomery Children Fiction War Stories Loyalbooks. com Loyal Books Audio Books Audiobook Free Audio Books EBooks. The Story Girl by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Published in 1911, the novel explores themes of childhood innocence and its transience, while highlighting the value of intangible things which prove to be the very essence of life.

I do like a road, because you can be always wondering what is at the end of it. The Story Girl said that once upon a time. Felix and I, on the May morning when we left Toronto for Prince Edward Island, had not then heard her say it, and, indeed, were but barely aware of the existence of such a person as the Story Girl. We did not know her at all under that name. We knew only that a cousin, Sara Stanley, whose mother, our Aunt Felicity, was dead, was living down on the Island with Uncle Roger and Aunt Olivia King, on a farm adjoining the old King homestead in Carlisle. We supposed we should get acquainted with her when we reached there, and we had an idea, from Aunt Olivia's letters to father, that she would be quite a jolly creature. Further than that we did not think about her. We were more interested in Felicity and Cecily and Dan, who lived on the homestead and would therefore be our roofmates for a season. But the spirit of the Story Girl's yet unuttered remark was thrilling in our hearts that morning, as the train pulled out of Toronto. We were faring forth on a long road; and, though we had some idea what would be at the end of it, there was enough glamour of the unknown about it to lend a wonderful charm to our speculations concerning it.
  • Kearanny
"The Story Girl" is author L.M. Montgomery's delightful novel about a group of young cousins and their friends enjoying a long summer on Prince Edward Island, Canada. At the center of the story is Sara Stanley, the Story Girl of the title, whose gift sparks the imagination and the adventures of her group. The children will work on the family farm, explore their town, and experience the small triumphs and disappointment common to the edge of adolescence in a earlier age. The narrative is largely driven by Sara Stanley's enchanting tales of adventure, romance, terror and suspense. The children are distinct and believable individuals; the author is said to have modeled the Story Girl after herself at that age.

"The Golden Road" is the sequel to "The Story Girl". It picks the characters without preamble and sends them off on new adventures. The children are older now, adolescents who are beginning to relate to the adult world. Together they will write and publish their own magazine, wrestle with New Year's resolutions, host an aunt who isn't an aunt, survive a snow storm, visit a witch, and attend their first wedding and first funeral. The Story Girl will finally solve the lingering mystery of the Awkward Man. The escapades of the characters still involve lots of innocent fun, but the adult world will intrude in ways not seen in the first novel. They will interact with each other as awkward adolescents, and the Story Girl herself will be on the verge of her first romance when a dramatic event changes everything.

"The Story Girl" and "The Golden Road" are very highly recommended to fans of Lucy Maud Montgomery, author of the "Anne of Green Gables" series.
  • OwerSpeed
I remember reading this as a kid; it was a library book or something, because the paperback had a plastic cover that would make a pleasing pop on the binding when I opened and closed it. I didn't remember much about the plot, but wishing I knew the Story Girl. The narrator of the book is now an adult reflecting on a summer he spent among relatives. Strangely as I re-read it, I feel a similar way as if I too had been a member of the little band of friends: beautiful and haughty Felicity (I never liked her), chubby Felix, smart and hard working Peter (Felicity never deserved him), sweet Cecily, pitiable Sara, dear Bev, and clever Dan. And of course the amazing, wonderful Story Girl! Though this era of childhood has passed, the innocence and sweetness remain. It's a good one.
  • Glei
Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery, famous for her "Anne of Green Gables" novels, had other novels that are well worth reading. One of them is "The Story Girl", which follows the adventures of a group of young cousins and their friends during a long summer on turn-of-the-century Prince Edward Island, Canada, Montgomery's birthplace and the setting of many of her stories. Montgomery modeled the leading character on herself at that age.

As the story opens, Bev King and his brother Felix travel to the family homestead in Carlisle. There, they stay with cousins Dan, Felicity, and Cecily King. Their circle will include neighbor Sara Ray, hired boy Peter Craig, and another cousin, Sara Stanley, the "Story Girl" of the title. Together, the children will work on the farm, play together, and experience the joys and small tragedies of pre-adolescence.

The novel is told from Bev King's perspective, but it is the ability of the Story Girl to tell convincing tales of adventure, romance, suspense, and even terror that moves the narrative. If the King cousins and their friends lived in a rather more innocent age, the lessons of their adventures may still of interest to a more sophisticated age. The children will work through some moral dilemmas and their sibling rivalries while learning about telling the truth, obeying adults, and mysteries of life such as sickness, witches, ghosts, and an ancient Blue Chest. Montgomery cleverly cast her characters for dramatic effect, moving the spotlight from chapter to chapter. Thus, the pretty and vain but domestically accomplished Felicity is often in competition with the plainer "Story Girl", who is a hilariously poor cook but has the gift of being interesting.

"The Story Girl" is very highly recommended to fans of L.M. Montgomery as an entertaining novel of childhood.
  • Tygralbine
The Story Girl is a beautifully-written classic. A perfect piece of literature that could be enjoyed by anyone, young or old. Beverley and Felix (two brothers) get to visit their father's childhood home on Prince Edward Island. They meet up with the rest of the 'clan' living there, including several cousins and friends their own age, that they get to while away the summer with. The passing days include playful fancies, raucous romps, and poetic tales (as narrated by their cousin Sara Stanley, the Story Girl).

No matter what the children are up to, the Story Girl always has an amusing incident to tell about, whether truth or fiction. As the chapters flew by, I found myself amazed at just how many stories the Story Girl conveniently had memorized. It must be nice to have such enchanting things to tell, especially at just the right moments to share with others.

One thing to note: The children do get quite curious about religious subjects, and sometimes, when several of their young minds all give individual opinions, end up having a muddled view on certain points of the Bible. For me, this just added an extra bit of laughter!

L.M. Montgomery has a lovely writing style, always knowing how to convey the whimsical parts of story just right to give an extra spark, and playing out all the other emotions so appealingly. There are many scenes in this book which I just love, whether it was the children's banters, schemes, or naive tragedies. I don't think I'll ever grow tired of reading of her books!