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Download Tennyson: To Strive, To Seek, To Find eBook

by John Batchelor

Download Tennyson: To Strive, To Seek, To Find eBook
ISBN:
0701180587
Author:
John Batchelor
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chatto & Windus (December 3, 2012)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1410 kb
FB2 book:
1537 kb
DJVU:
1677 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
533


John Batchelor has used a phrase from Tennyson's poem, Ulysses – "To strive, to seek, to find" – as his book's subtitle, presumably because these words are now inscribed on a wall in the Olympic Park. But if he hopes this will make his book appear more relevant, he will be disappointed.

John Batchelor has used a phrase from Tennyson's poem, Ulysses – "To strive, to seek, to find" – as his book's subtitle, presumably because these words are now inscribed on a wall in the Olympic Park. I sat on the committee that selected this line for the athletes' village (it ends: "and not to yield"), and all I can tell you is that we chose a sentiment, not a poet.

To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. More than any other Victorian-era writer, Tennyson has seemed the embodiment of his age, both to his contemporaries and to modern readers. More About this Poem.

John Batchelor’s biography, ‘Tennyson To Strive To Seek To Find’ includes some fascinating reading sources published throughout the last thirty years! Batchelor takes a different view of Tennyson's life covering aspects of not only the much written and well-known topics such as hi. .

John Batchelor’s biography, ‘Tennyson To Strive To Seek To Find’ includes some fascinating reading sources published throughout the last thirty years! Batchelor takes a different view of Tennyson's life covering aspects of not only the much written and well-known topics such as his difficult relationship with his father George Clayton Tennyson (1778-1831) but sheds light on Tennyson's sibling and writing relationship with older brother Charles Tennyson Turner (1808-79) whom he was published with early in life just before going. off to Cambridge together.

As John Batchelor’s biography reveals, the poet was almost as much a prodigy as Keats. For example, his visionary poem The Kraken - about the legendary sea monster that lies somnolent on the ocean floor - was published in 1830. Batchelor’s biography is painstaking in its detail, but Tennyson was really a rather dull dog. As anyone knows from Julia Margaret Cameron’s immortal photographs, he was magnificent to look at - a big man, with charismatic presence, shaggy-haired, bearded, with a liking for wide-brimmed hats - but he eschewed flamboyance and excess in his personal life.

John Batchelor’s biography, ‘Tennyson To Strive To Seek To Find’ includes some fascinating reading sources published throughout the last thirty years! Batchelor takes a different view of Tennyson's life covering aspects of not only the much written and well-known topics such as his difficult relationship with his father George Clayton Tennyson (1778-1831) but sheds light on Tennyson's sibling and writing relationship with older brother Charles Tennyson Turner (1808-79) whom he was published with John Batchelor’s biography, ‘Tennyson To. Strive To Seek To Find’ includes some fascinati.

One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

Tennyson's 1842 volume of poetry impressed Scottish writer. One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Tennyson : To Strive, to Seek, to Find .

"This is a perceptive biography, admirably identifying the social origins of Tennyson's spiritual torments. "This fine biography revives.

The picture of Tennyson on the front cover of John Batchelor’s brimful biography is striking to say the least: he.Tennyson’s journey from radical to pillar of the Establishment followed that of Wordsworth, whom he succeeded as poet laureate in 1850

The picture of Tennyson on the front cover of John Batchelor’s brimful biography is striking to say the least: he looks like a pistol-whirling Wild Bill Hickok. He was, of course, nothing of the sort. He can hardly be said to have been involved in any serious literary spats, let alone shoot- outs - although there was that business in which he and his close friend Arthur Henry Hallam went to Spain to deliver letters and money to rebels fighting to depose the Spanish monarchy. Tennyson’s journey from radical to pillar of the Establishment followed that of Wordsworth, whom he succeeded as poet laureate in 1850. William Gladstone famously went in the other direction.

Lord Alfred Tennyson was the major poet of his age. In 1850, he succeeded William Wordsworth as Queen Victoria's Poet Laurete, and this book begins and ends with Tennyson's direct contacts with the Queen, whom Tennyson had first came to know at audience at an Osborne House on the Isle of Wight in 1862.John Batchelor's enthralling new biography presents a Tennyson who is stronger, more self-reliant, and more business-like than previous biographies have displayed. Like many successful Victorians he was a provincial determined to make good in the capital while retaining his provincial strengths; in his particular case he never lost his Lincolnshire accent and in his relationships he remained close to his roots. At the same time and through his Laureteship, he determined the literary taste of the mid-to late Victorian period; and then, strategically, and with a secure instinct for the market, he fed that taste. The ascendancy of Tennyson was neither the irresistible triumph of pure genius nor an accident of history; he skilfully crafted his own career and his relationship with his audience.
  • Itiannta
The greatest of Victorian poets comes alive in this biography. Vi really enjoyed the stories behind some of his poems. Excellent book.
  • Gholbirdred
The reader has to wade through a vast sea of social minutiae to get to the man.
  • Ielonere
The delivery and quality of the item met expectations .
  • snowball
In its tedious, endless attention to daily activities, dress and mannerisms of Tennyson, this biography overlooks the essence of his literary genius. This is of the biographical genre that misses the forest for the trees. I checked it out at the library (thank goodness), as I read The Idylls of the King, which is amazing. I looked for Idylls in the Index and it wasn't there; I discovered that the Index carries his works under, "Tennyson, Alfred", which is strange in itself. I finally went to "Merlin and Vivien", one of the works in the Idylls, hoping to find something of Tennyson's struggles, insights and correspondence - not there. Instead, I found such as this, "They habitually took houses in London in the summer; for the summer of 1865, for example, they rented Gore Lodge, Kensington, home of Emily's relation Lady Franklin. A great deal of entertaining took place at Gore Lodge. Robert Browning, Lord Houghton, Carlyle, James Spedding, Venables, the Lushingtons and Gladstone were among the older friends"

If you like to this sort of thing, have at it - but be forewarned.
  • Via
Ulysses, the Lotus-eaters, Crossing the bar, In Memoriam and of course, the Charge of the Light Brigade, are amongst the best known and dearly loved works of a Victorian poet who is now much neglected. He should not be. In Memoriam in particular is unique and can hold its head high alongside Paradise Lost and the Prelude (which it outsold). Just as with another casually disparaged genius, Rudyard Kipling, the English language is saturated with commonplaces phrases whose origin we forget: 'nature red in tooth and claw and 'the reason why' are perhaps the best known. Tennyson also penned the most beautifully onomatopoeic lines: 'the moan of doves in immemorial elms and murmuring of innumerable bees.' However, writers of the calibre of Tennyson or Kipling will live forever and will make a comeback against so much modern ephemera that is taught in schools in their despite. Neither was a woman, neither was black, neither was disabled, neither was illiterate, neither was Russell Brand nor Bob Dylan. They were both merely great writers, and an integral part of the grand tradition of English literature.

This biography does its job well, reiterating the details of its subject's life, and describing and analysing his works. More time could have been spent on his much neglected plays, and especially on Becket which stands well alongside Eliot's Murder in the Cathedral (an interesting double-bill for some impresario?). More could have been said about Arthur Hallam. Fortunately there is an excellent recent biography on him, A Life Lived Quickly, by Blocksidge, which should also be read by anyone captivated by Tennyson's haunting momento mori.
  • Mysterious Wrench
John Batchelor’s biography, ‘Tennyson To Strive To Seek To Find’ includes some fascinating reading sources published throughout the last thirty years! Batchelor takes a different view of Tennyson's life covering aspects of not only the much written and well-known topics such as his difficult relationship with his father George Clayton Tennyson (1778-1831) but sheds light on Tennyson's sibling and writing relationship with older brother Charles Tennyson Turner (1808-79) whom he was published with early in life just before going off to Cambridge together. Batchelor writes with tenderness and respect about Alfred Tennyson's life especially when it comes to his familial relationships with his grandparents and aunts including quotations from correspondence and painting portraits as well.

When it comes to Alfred's later years including his life with wife Emily, her side of the family (The Sellwoods), their children, and even grandchildren; it's all here in a well written and engaging account of the greatest poet of the nineteenth century and the Victorian era Alfred Lord Tennyson. He was an introspective man who loved nature, who felt at one with it, who loved words, his family, and who cherished his friends all his life. So, if anyone is attempting to discover who the man Alfred was before and after becoming Poet Laureate, I urge you to read John Batchelor's 'Tennyson: To strive, to seek, to find.'

The illustrations include portraits and photographs of The Tennyson Family as well as his mates at Trinity.