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Download The Most Dangerous Art: Poetry, Politics, and Autobiography after the Russian Revolution eBook

by Donald Loewen

Download The Most Dangerous Art: Poetry, Politics, and Autobiography after the Russian Revolution eBook
ISBN:
0739120832
Author:
Donald Loewen
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lexington Books (December 5, 2007)
Pages:
238 pages
EPUB book:
1401 kb
FB2 book:
1982 kb
DJVU:
1379 kb
Other formats
rtf doc lit txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
177


The Most Dangerous Art provides a subtle and far-reaching analysis of how poetic culture engaged with political . Slavic and East European Journal, Fall 2009)

The Most Dangerous Art provides a subtle and far-reaching analysis of how poetic culture engaged with political reality in the Soviet er. Slavic and East European Journal, Fall 2009).

Donald Loewen provides detailed close readings of these biographies and juxtaposes these readings with historical context. The Most Dangerous Art is an illuminating contribution to the study of Russian literature.

The Most Dangerous Art is passionately argued and very smoothly written

The Most Dangerous Art is passionately argued and very smoothly written. After introducing their broader context, Donald Loewen studies autobiographical prose by three of the greatest Russian poets: Mandelshtam, Pasternak, and Tsvetaeva. Loewen brings out the complexity of these documents of informed resistance. The Most Dangerous Art offers important insights for readers who care about the relationship of poetry and prose, literature and politics, creativity and oppression in an era when poetry was a matter of life and death―dangerous stuff indeed.

The Most Dangerous Art book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Most Dangerous Art: Poetry, Politics, and Autobiography After the Russian Revolution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Most Dangerous Art shows how these autobiographies trace an emotional trajectory that corresponds to the intensity of the social and state pressures that threatened Russian poets from the early 1920s to the late 1950s. During a period when literature became intensely political, and creative freedom became intensely risky, these autobiographies proclaim poetry's immortality and defend the poet's right to individual creativity against an increasingly threatening Soviet literary hierarchy.

The Most Dangerous Art Poetry, Politics, and Autobiography after the Russian Revolution by Donald Loewen and Publisher Lexington Books. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780739157909, 0739157906. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780739120842, 0739120840. Poetry, Politics, and Autobiography after the Russian Revolution. Publisher: Lexington Books. Print ISBN: 9780739120842, 0739120840.

The Most Dangerous Art shows how these autobiographies trace an. . Donald Loewen provides detailed close readings of these biographies and juxtaposes these readings with historical context.

Lanham, M. Rowman and Littlefield, 2008.

The book shows how three of Russia's most important twentieth century poets used autobiographical prose to defend poetry and the poet in an era when poetry was under attack. It juxtaposes these autobiographies with each other and with the culturo-political events that followed Russia's 1917 October Revolution in a way that has never previously been attempted.

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At a time in Russia's history when poets could be (and sometimes were) killed for a poem, the autobiographies of three prominent poets, Osip Mandelstam, Marina Tsvetaeva, and Boris Pasternak, became a courageous defense of poetry. The Most Dangerous Art shows how these autobiographies trace an emotional trajectory that corresponds to the intensity of the social and state pressures that threatened Russian poets from the early 1920s to the late 1950s. During a period when literature became intensely political, and creative freedom became intensely risky, these autobiographies proclaim poetry's immortality and defend the poet's right to individual creativity against an increasingly threatening Soviet literary hierarchy. Donald Loewen provides detailed close readings of these biographies and juxtaposes these readings with historical context. The Most Dangerous Art is an illuminating contribution to the study of Russian literature. The volume is of special interest to researchers of 20th century Russian literature and autobiography.