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by John Heaton

Download Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis eBook
ISBN:
1840461322
Author:
John Heaton
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Totem Books (May 15, 2000)
Pages:
80 pages
EPUB book:
1764 kb
FB2 book:
1670 kb
DJVU:
1669 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
588


Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis book. Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein were contemporaries. Freud created psychoanalysis, and Wittgenstein was perhaps the greatest 20th century philosopher.

Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis book.

Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein were contemporaries. Both thinkers are essentially concerned with our inveterate tendency to deceive ourselves. Freud approaches this problem from a psychiatric angle - the cure of neurosis, psychosis, perversion and so on. He assumes that his readers can see through the self-deceptions of the neurotics he describes.

Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis" brings these two great, enormously influential Viennese thinkers together in the arena of a postmodern .

Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis" brings these two great, enormously influential Viennese thinkers together in the arena of a postmodern encounter. The question at issue is - which of these two philosophies is the better form of relevant "therapy" for us today? Or is it ever a matter of "contest" between them? About the Author. He is also the author of Introducing Wittgenstein, published by Icon/Totem. See all Product description.

Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis. Postmodern Encounters. By (author) John Heaton.

Freud created psychoanalysis, and Wittgenstein was perhaps the greatest 20th century philosopher. Author(s) : John M. Heaton. Publisher : Icon Books. Pages : 80. Category : Reprinting. Category 2 : Psychoanalysis. Catalogue No : 10271. ISBN 13 : 9781840461329.

John Steiner’s clear style of writing, emerging from observations made in his clinical practice, provides depth of. .

John Steiner’s clear style of writing, emerging from observations made in his clinical practice, provides depth of insight, sensitivity and a real interest and concern for his patients. One measure of Steiner’s contribution to psychoanalysis is the number of terms and expressions he used that are now common currency, such as ‘pathological organisations of the personality’, ‘psychic retreats’, ‘emerging from psychic retreats’, ‘seeing and being seen’, and ‘patient-centred and analyst-centred interpretations’. DOI: 1. 002/9781118884607. In book: A Companion to Wittgenstein, p. 51-666. Cite this publication. University of Oxford. This chapter examines three main themes: the unconscious; dreams, jokes, and the nature of psychoanalytic explanation; and the relation between psychoanalysis and Wittgenstein's method in philosophy.

In this superb book John Heaton presents and defends a post Freudian 'talking cure' approach to psychotherapy. This book shows how Wittgenstein's therapeutic method can be applied to psychotherapy. What gives the book a special weight is its reliance on the work of Wittgenstein. Scarcely a page goes by without a quotation from and insightful remarks on his writing. This appeal to Wittgenstein is remarkable in its depth of understanding and in the range of texts cited. Dr Daniele Moyal-Sharrock, University of Hertfordshire, UK.

Using the work of Wittgenstein, John Heaton challenges the notion of theoretical expertise on.Wittgenstein and Psychotherapy. From Paradox to Wonder.

Using the work of Wittgenstein, John Heaton challenges the notion of theoretical expertise on the mind, arguing for a n.

Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein were contemporaries. Freud created psychoanalysis, and Wittgenstein was perhaps the greatest 20th century philosopher.

Both thinkers are essentially concerned with illusion and our inveterate tendency to deceive ourselves. Freud approaches this problem from a psychiatric angle the cure of neurosis, psychosis, perversion, and so on. He assumes that his readers are sensible people who can see through the self-deceptions of the neurotics he describes. Wittgenstein, on the other hand, takes an ironical approach to himself and his readers, believing that we are almost certainly deluded, even if we have been analysed by an orthodox analyst. He makes us feel that language, understanding and knowledge are but a thin net over an abyss.

"Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis" brings these two great, enormously influential Viennese thinkers together in the arena of a postmodern encounter. The question at issue is which of these two philosophies is the better form of relevant therapy for us today? Or is it ever a matter of contest between them?