almediah.fr
» » The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books

Download The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books eBook

by Peter Sis,Azar Nafisi

Download The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books eBook
ISBN:
0670026069
Author:
Peter Sis,Azar Nafisi
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Viking Press; 1st edition (October 21, 2014)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1939 kb
FB2 book:
1699 kb
DJVU:
1364 kb
Other formats
lrf azw rtf mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
675


Azar Nafisi’s captivating Republic of Imagination answers this question with a resounding ye. In The Republic of Imagination, the mirror-image of her first book, Nafisi explores the influence fiction has had on life in America, where literature, while not outlawed, is endangered.

Azar Nafisi’s captivating Republic of Imagination answers this question with a resounding yes. Animated by an electrifying intelligence and a generosity that is nothing short of uplifting, this blend of memoir, biography, and a deep reading of three quintessentially American literary texts makes a successful case for the importance of fiction.

ALSO BY AZAR NAFISI Reading Lolita in Tehran Things I’ve Been Silent About Anti-Terra: A Critical Study of. .

ALSO BY AZAR NAFISI Reading Lolita in Tehran Things I’ve Been Silent About Anti-Terra: A Critical Study of Vladimir Nabokov’s Novels BiBi and the Green Voice VIKING Published. Used by permission of Liveright Publishing Corporation.

On October 21, 2014, Viking Books released Nafisi's newest book, The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books, in which using The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt, and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, as well as the writings of James Baldwin and many others, Nafisi.

On October 21, 2014, Viking Books released Nafisi's newest book, The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books, in which using The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt, and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, as well as the writings of James Baldwin and many others, Nafisi responds to an Iranian reader that questioned whether Americans care about or need their literature.

Ten years ago, Azar Nafisi electrified readers with her multimillion-copy bestseller READING LOLITA IN.In this electrifying follow-up, she argues that fiction is just as threatened -and just as invaluable -in America today.

Ten years ago, Azar Nafisi electrified readers with her multimillion-copy bestseller READING LOLITA IN TEHRAN, which told the story of how, against the backdrop of morality squads and executions, she taught THE GREAT GATSBY and other classics of English and American literature to her eager students in Iran. View PDF. Save to Library.

The Republic of Imagination book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran, presents a tribute to the importance of fiction to democracy that blends memoir with close readings of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. History & Society. Things I've Been Silent About.

Azar Nafisi is the author of two New York Times–bestselling memoirs, Reading Lolita in Tehran and Things I’ve Been Silent About. A passionate advocate of books and reading, she speaks to packed audiences around the world about the importance of nurturing a democratic imagination. She lives in Washington, .

What Reading Lolita in Tehran was for Iran, The Republic of Imagination is for America

What Reading Lolita in Tehran was for Iran, The Republic of Imagination is for America. Taking her cue from a challenge thrown to her in Seattle, where a skeptical reader told her that Americans dont care about books the way they did back in Iran, she challenges those who say fiction has nothing to teach us.

A passionate hymn to the power of fiction to change people’s lives, by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Reading Lolita in TehranTen years ago, Azar Nafisi electrified readers with her million-copy bestseller, Reading Lolita in Tehran, which told the story of how, against the backdrop of morality squads and executions, she taught The Great Gatsby and other classics to her eager students in Iran. In this exhilarating followup, Nafisi has written the book her fans have been waiting for: an impassioned, beguiling, and utterly original tribute to the vital importance of fiction in a democratic society. What Reading Lolita in Tehran was for Iran, The Republic of Imagination is for America.Taking her cue from a challenge thrown to her in Seattle, where a skeptical reader told her that Americans don’t care about books the way they did back in Iran, she energetically responds to those who say fiction has nothing to teach us. Blending memoir and polemic with close readings of her favorite American novels—The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt, and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, among others—she invites us to join her as citizens of her “Republic of Imagination,” a country where the villains are conformity and orthodoxy and the only passport to entry is a free mind and a willingness to dream.
  • Usanner
I must start with a little piece of personal information that does relate to this wonderful book. My mother was proud--very, very proud--to be a member of the Mayflower Society. And she signed my two natural born daughters as life members but not my son who was adopted and is Obama black (white natural mother, black natural father) because only those who are blood-lined can belong she said (probably true). But she never wanted to acknowledge that her father's mother, who died in childbirth, was Native American. So when I arrived at page 60 of this book, I just roared because Twain had it all so very, very right about my white Puritan ancestors! Horrid people really!
Although I thought maybe the introduction (it's 35 pages long) could have been reduced some--that maybe some of the personal information about the author's Iranian roots and the friendships she has had with women who were born there but came here to live were not really that relevant, once I got into the "meat" of the book, it just couldn't have been more wonderful. So I have just ordered copies of "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," (it's been years since I read it), "Babbitt" (haven't read it since college over fifty years ago where I majored in English), and a collection of Carson McCuller's shorter works: the three authors Azar Nafisi has selected to analyze.
This is a book that English teachers should read at both the high school and college/university level. It is not a book filled with scholarly footnotes (there are none) but instead is a passionate long essay about the values of reading quality literature, most especially these three authors.
If I would award it a few more stars I would.
  • Tansino
This turned out to be very good. The introduction alone is a strong case for literacy and deep reading and a lament for what the rich and politicians have done to impose a new kind of illiteracy on the poor. I was struck by one quote she found from John Adams in 1765 wrote, "A native of America who cannot read or write is as rare an appearance...as a comet or an earthquake." And this apparently was true and remained true for a number of years. I had previously read that the literacy rate tested on inducted WWI white soldiers was in the low 90 percent. It dipped in the WW2 testing and dipped further to the mid sixties for Vietnam.

Nafisi chose three books to illustrate the American reading experience. Huckleberry Finn, Babbitt, and The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. She doesn't really examine critically the three books but instead tells stories about them that illustrate her choices and her view of American Literature.
  • Fawrindhga
Nafisi is the author of Reading Lolita in Tehran. Although this book is more theoretical than that highly personal work, it still contains Nafisi's insight into the power of fiction, especially as seen in three American novels.

If you love literature and want to delve more deeply into the reason for its continuing appeal, you will like this work. Highly recommended, but not light reading.
  • Uranneavo
I saw this author interviewed on PBS and had read her amazing book Reading Lolita in Tehran. This is an imaginative and insightful book which showed my country and the wisdom of writers in a whole new light. I have always wondered if I read too much! After this I realized that is just not possible!!!
  • Qumenalu
I eagerly bought this book because I loved Reading Lolita in Tehran so much. Let me be clear. This is NOT that book. And it shouldn't be, as I suppose Tehran is a tough one to follow. However, I became totally engrossed in the first part of the book, the part about Huck Finn. I found the sections on Sinclair Lewis and Carson McCullers to be forced and contrived. McCullers is actually one of my favorite authors, and I love The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. But, while reading Republic, I kept feeling like Nafisi was grasping to draw conclusions between that novel and the theme of her book.
  • Mmsa
I am passionate about this book. She gives us all plenty of reason to re-think our neglect of our national literature.
  • Longitude Temporary
What an amazing read. Even just the introduction is brilliant. Azar Nafisi is just incredible. The world is so lucky to have her perspective.
I loved this book. Will reread it. For book club.