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Download Jean Rhys: The West Indian Novels eBook

by Teresa F. O'Connor

Download Jean Rhys: The West Indian Novels eBook
ISBN:
0814761747
Author:
Teresa F. O'Connor
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
New York University Press (June 1, 1986)
Pages:
247 pages
EPUB book:
1697 kb
FB2 book:
1969 kb
DJVU:
1444 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
453


Making use of the unpublished manuscripts and biographical sources of Jean Rhys. by Teresa F. O'Connor.

by Teresa F. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780814761649.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Jean Rhys: The West Indian Novels. Making use of the unpublished manuscripts and biographical sources of Jean Rhys as well as the published works, this book analyzes the cultural, historical and family influences on the Dominican-born author

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: New York University Press. Publication Date: 1986. Making use of the unpublished manuscripts and biographical sources of Jean Rhys as well as the published works, this book analyzes the cultural, historical and family influences on the Dominican-born author. Most notable of the unpublished works is "The Black Exercise Book", a private journal Rhys kept in the 1930s, which helps to locate the sources of alienation, despair and self-destroying sexuality that were central to the author's life and her literary efforts.

For a discussion of the influence of the Black Exercise Book and Mr. Howard on Rhys’s fiction, see Teresa O’Connor, Jean Rhys: The West Indian Novel (New York: New York University Press, 1986), 4Google Scholar. Coral Ann Howells, Jean Rhys (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991). 20. There are a number approaches to reading this symbolic relationship between Rhys’s heroines and enslaved Afro-Caribbeans.

Jean Rhys: The West Indian Novels. An Introduction to the Study of West Indian Literature. As the foremost white West Indian writer of this century and author of the widely acclaimed novel "Wide Sargasso Sea," Jean Rhys (1890-1979) has attracted much critical attention, most often from the perspective of gender analysis. Veronica Gregg extends our critical appreciation of Rhys by analyzing the complex relationship between Rhys's identity and the structures of her fiction, and she reveals the ways in which this relationship is connected to the history of British colonization of the West Indies.

This chapter addresses in what sense Jean Rhys could be called a West Indian

Ella Gwendolen Rees Williams, was a mid 20th century Dominican novelist. A new BBC TV drama and a book highlight the writer who fought depression to forge an extraordinary career, writes Vanessa Thorpe. This chapter addresses in what sense Jean Rhys could be called a West Indian. Three of her first four novels, and many of her short stories, are placed in Europe, and have heroines with no apparent knowledge of the Caribbean.

Jean Rhys Jean Rhys (1890-1979) is best known for her novel .

Jean Rhys Jean Rhys (1890-1979) is best known for her novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, which was published in 1966 when she was 7. The West Indian Novels by Teresa F. O'Connor, 1986; Rhys and the Novel as Women's Text by Nancy R. Harrison, 1988; Rhys, Stead, Lessing, and the Politics of Empathy by Judith Kegan Gardiner, 1989; The Unspeakable Mother: Forbidden Discourse in Rhys and H. D. by Deborah Kelly Kloepfer, 1989; The Rhys Woman by Paula Le Gallez, 1990; Critical Perspectives on Rhys.

Her novels written in the 1930s mercilessly exploit her own emotional life, depicting pretty, no-longer-young women who find themselves down and out in large European cities.

Emery considers all five Rhys novels, beginning with Wide Sargasso Sea as the most explicitly Caribbean in its setting, in its participation in the culminating decades of a West Indian literary naissance, and most importantly, in it. .

Emery considers all five Rhys novels, beginning with Wide Sargasso Sea as the most explicitly Caribbean in its setting, in its participation in the culminating decades of a West Indian literary naissance, and most importantly, in its subversive transformation of European concepts of character. From a sociocultural perspective, she argues persuasively that the earlier novels-Voyage in the Dark, Quartet, After Leaving Mr. Mackenzie, and Good Morning, Midnight-should be read as emergent Caribbean fiction, written in tense dialogue with European modernism.

Harrison determines what the form of a well-made women's novel discloses about the conditions of women's communication .

Harrison determines what the form of a well-made women's novel discloses about the conditions of women's communication and the literary production that emerges from them.

Making use of the unpublished manuscripts and biographical sources of Jean Rhys as well as the published works, this book analyzes the cultural, historical and family influences on the Dominican-born author. Most notable of the unpublished works is "The Black Exercise Book", a private journal Rhys kept in the 1930s, which helps to locate the sources of alienation, despair and self-destroying sexuality that were central to the author's life and her literary efforts. Here O'Connor finds important artistic and personal reasons for Rhys's perpetuation of the myth regarding her homeland, and reveals the importance of place in her work.