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by Shelby Foote,Constance Garnett,Anton Chekhov

Download Anton Chekhov Later Short Stories, 1888-1903 (Modern Library) eBook
ISBN:
0679603166
Author:
Shelby Foote,Constance Garnett,Anton Chekhov
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Modern Library; 4th Printing edition (January 26, 1999)
Pages:
656 pages
EPUB book:
1271 kb
FB2 book:
1348 kb
DJVU:
1541 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
675


Other Chekhov collections from the Modern Library: Early Short Stories: 1883-1888 . Some say that Chekhov didn't become Chekhov until this late period.

Other Chekhov collections from the Modern Library: Early Short Stories: 1883-1888 Longer Stories from the Last Decade. Hardcover: 656 pages.

This volume presents forty-two of Chekhov's later short stories, written between 1888 and 1903, in acclaimed translations by Constance Garnett and chosen by Shelby Foote. Among the most outstanding are "A Dreary Story," a dispassionate tale that reflects Chekhov's doubts about his role as an artist. Chekhov is one of the few indispensable writers," said Susan Sontag. His stories, which deluge us with feeling, make feeling more intelligent; more magnanimous. He is an artist of our moral maturity. This volume presents forty-two of Chekhov's later short stories, written between 1888 and 1903, in acclaimed translations by Constance Garnett and chosen by Shelby Foote.

Later Short Stories, 1888-1903 book. This volume presents forty-two of Chekhov's later short stories, written between 1888 and 1903, in acclaimed translations by Constance Garnett and chosen by Shelby Foote

Later Short Stories, 1888-1903 book. Thomas Mann deemed it "a truly extraordinary, fascinating story. unlike anything else in world literature.

About Anton Chekhov: One of Russia's greatest writers, Chekhov began his career writing jokes and anecdotes for popular magazines to support himself while he studied to become a doctor. Between 1888 and his death he single-handedly revolutionized both the drama and the short story. Near the end of his life he married an actress, Olga Knipper. He died from tuberculosis in 1904, age 44. About this project: Constance Garnett translated and published 13 volumes of Chekhov stories in the years 1916-1922.

Chekhov is one of the few indispensable writers, said Susan Sontag. Tells the stories of a doubting writer, the unexpected results of a love affair, and everyday people facing life's surprises.

Items related to Anton Chekhov Later Short Stories, 1888-1903 (Modern. Chekhov, Anton Anton Chekhov Later Short Stories, 1888-1903 (Modern Library). ISBN 13: 9780679603160. Anton Chekhov Later Short Stories, 1888-1903 (Modern Library).

Anton Chekhov at the Moscow Art Theatre: Archive Illustrations of the Original Productions. Anton Chekhov (Routledge Modern and Contemporary Dramatists). The Complete Short Novels. Download (PDF). Читать. Anton Chekhov (Bloom's Modern Critical Views).

This collection, selected by Shelby Foote, presents seventy of Chekhov's early short stories, written between 1883 and 1888, in celebrated translations by Constance Garnett

This collection, selected by Shelby Foote, presents seventy of Chekhov's early short stories, written between 1883 and 1888, in celebrated translations by Constance Garnett. One of the most memorable is "The Death of a Government Clerk, " a glorious parody in which a fawning official is undone by an ill-timed sneeze.

201 Stories by Anton Chekhov

201 Stories by Anton Chekhov. About Anton Chekhov: One of Russia's greatest writers, Chekhov began his career writing jokes and anecdotes for popular magazines to support himself while he studied to become a doctor.

"        Chekhov is one of the few indispensable writers," said Susan Sontag. "His stories, which deluge us with feeling, make feeling more intelligent; more magnanimous. He is an artist of our moral maturity."        This volume presents forty-two of Chekhov's later short stories, written between 1888 and 1903, in acclaimed translations by Constance Garnett and chosen by Shelby Foote. Among the most outstanding are "A Dreary Story," a dispassionate tale that reflects Chekhov's doubts about his role as an artist. Thomas Mann deemed it "a truly extraordinary, fascinating story . . . unlike anything else in world literature." "The Darling," a delightful work highly admired by Tolstoy, offers comic proof that life has no meaning without love. And in "The Lady with the Dog," which Vladimir Nabokov called "one of the greatest stories ever written," a chance affair takes possession of a bored young woman and a cynical roué, changing their lives forever. Also included in this collection are the famous trilogy, "The Man in a Case," "Gooseberries," and "About Love," as well as "Sleepy," "The Horse-Stealers," and "Betrothed."        "The greatest of Chekhov's stories are, no matter how many times reread, always an experience that strikes deep into the soul and produces an alteration there," wrote William Maxwell. "As for those masterpieces 'The Lady with the Dog,' 'The Horse-Stealers,' 'Sleepy,' 'Gooseberries,' 'About Love'--where else do you see so clearly the difference between light and dark, or how dark darkness can be."        Shelby Foote has provided an Introduction for this edition.
  • Mustard Forgotten
Some say that Chekhov didn't become Chekhov until this late period. Great editing from Shelby Foote, the renowned Civil War author.
  • Nekora
You can't compete with Chekov
  • Marr
In the waning years of the 19th Century, Anton Chekhov wrote stories about the Russian middle class, with themes revolving around men and women who let their lives go astray, particularly with regard to love and marriage. Chronologically and artistically, his fiction is a sort of literary bridge between Tchaikovsky-era romanticism and Stravinsky-era chaos. Unlike Dostoevsky, he did not delve deeply into man's problems in dealing with society; he did not have any overt political or religious agenda; hot-button issues like socialism and anti-semitism are barely given a nod. A physician himself, he often used doctors as characters, marveling at their ability to mend bodies but not souls.
In Chekhov's stories, marriage is hardly a bed of roses, usually resulting in discontentment, depression, and adultery; nowhere is this more perfectly executed than in "The Lady with the Dog," which ends with the two transgressors not contrite over their sins, but resolving to carry on their affair in the face of uncertainty. In "The Party," a young married couple's disharmony culminates in a tragedy that underscores their need to love each other. Chekhov's characters tend to marry for the wrong reasons, like societal pressure, false hopes of marital bliss ("The Helpmate," "Betrothed"), and convenience and mutual benefit ("Anna on the Neck"). His characters usually are people who mean well but do the wrong things: In "At a Country House," a cultural elitist has a habit of scaring off the very men he wants his daughters to marry.
Chekhov also touches on themes of pure, often unrequited, love. "The Beauties" is a plaintive tale of infatuation, of a boy's enthralling first discovery of intangible feminine beauty. His lonely characters, such as in "The Schoolmistress," "A Doctor's Visit," and "The Darling," are often prisoners of their own inhibitions, obsessions, and self-obligations.
Other topics are covered, often exhibiting a world-weary cynicism. In the amusing fable "The Shoemaker and the Devil," the protagonist's conclusion is not the cliched lesson to be thankful for the few things he has in life, but rather that there is nothing in life worth selling his soul to the devil for. "Rothschild's Fiddle" is like a Marc Chagall painting set to prose, portraying the futility and bitterness of life offset by the beauty of art, while "Whitebrow" is a fuzzy parable. Chekhov also displays a talent for drawing comical characters, such as the talkative blowhard in "The Petchenyeg" and the prudish protagonist of "The Man in a Case." A mark of Chekhov's style is that these people often are oblivious to their own idiosyncrasies, a touch that injects as much comedy as tragedy into the stories.
These stories might leave one with the impression that Chekhov was pessimistic about love and marriage, and even life, but in my opinion they emphasize a fundamental truism about fiction -- much as in comedy, where failure is funnier than success, even though "good" love is what makes the world go around, "bad" love is more interesting to write about.
  • Heraly
I studied Russian literature for years and would ultimately rank the prose biggies as follows: Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Turgenev. I frankly prefer Chekhov, however, to the megalomaniac Tolstoy. Reading Chekhov is truly uncanny. He utterly refutes our common cliche'd notions about "Russianness." His is really the most modern voice of nineteenth century literature, without the "modernism" of our century that has so easily dated. I fell in love with Chekhov partly because his Russian is the simplest and most prosaic of any Russian writer and I was consequently able to read him without mediation. I would have included certain stories in an anthology in lieu of others, namely: "In the Ravine" (V ovragie) "Murder" (Ubiijstvo) "An Attack of Nerves" (Pripadok) "The Peasants" (Muzhiki) "Gusev" (Gusev) ...and many others....
  • Fomand
Style, style, style. While it's all well and good that the reviewers below emphasize the stylistic impact Chekhov's writings have had on practically EVERY modern short story, it is important to note that his stories combine to form one of the greatest humanistic manifestos in all of literature. Throughout his life as a doctor and a writer, Chekhov's deceptively laconic artistic sensibility was constantly focused on human interests and values. Human beings, in all their messy, hurtful, tragic glory, puzzled the good doctor, but he accepted them for what they were. His writing reflects his wide embrace of all that we are. Chekhov was a great lover of mankind, and arguably its finest chronicler. His stories are clear-eyed, unsentimental reports from the front lines of human existence. Given attention, they will surely instruct and broaden any heart. We should be eternally grateful.
  • Siratius
Anton Chekhov is a world-known master of a short novel. If you like kind humour, if you enjoy reading life-based stories, if you just want to have good time with a good book - this is what you need.
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