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Download The Dancing Mind: Speech upon Acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished C ontribution to American Letters eBook

by Toni Morrison

Download The Dancing Mind: Speech upon Acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished C ontribution to American Letters eBook
ISBN:
037540032X
Author:
Toni Morrison
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Knopf; 1 edition (December 24, 1996)
Pages:
24 pages
EPUB book:
1717 kb
FB2 book:
1287 kb
DJVU:
1220 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
558


On the occasion of her acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters on the sixth of November, 1996, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison speaks with brevity and passion to the pleasures, the difficulties, the necessities, of the reading/writing life in our time. The Dancing Mind" (book version) contains the text of a speech delivered by Toni Morrison in 1996, when she accepted the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

The Dancing Mind book. On the occasion of her acceptance of the National Book Foundation.

On the occasion of her acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters on the sixth of November, 1996, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison speaks with brevity and passion to the pleasures, the difficulties, the necessities, o. .

On the occasion of her acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters on the sixth of November, 1996, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison speaks with brevity and passion to the pleasures, the difficulties, the necessities, of the reading/writing life in our time. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Need help ASAP? We have you covered with 24/7 instant online tutoring

Authors: Toni Morrison. Books are required to be returned at the end of the rental period.

Authors: Toni Morrison. Availability: Ready to ship.

Introduction to a Special Issue of the Journal of Medical Humanities. Paul Crawford, Charley Baker, Brian Z. Brown. The Journal of medical humanities.

oceedings{Morrison1996TheDM, title {The dancing mind : speech upon acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters on the sixth of November, Nineteen hundred and ninety-six}, author {Toni Morrison}, year {1996} }. Toni Morrison. Introduction to a Special Issue of the Journal of Medical Humanities.

Toni Morrison is the Robert F. Goheen Professor of Humanities at Princeton University. She has received the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In 1993 she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. She lives in Rockland County, New York, and Princeton, New Jersey.

The National Book Foundation, presenter of the National Book Awards, announced that it.You can find the full Associated Press announcement here.

The National Book Foundation, presenter of the National Book Awards, announced that it will award Edmund White with the 2019 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters (DCAL).

Toni Morrison is the author of eleven novels, from The Bluest Eye (1970) to God Help the Child (2015).

Speech upon Acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished C ontribution to American Letters. On the occasion of her acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters on the sixth of November, 1996, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison speaks with brevity and passion to the pleasures, the difficulties, the necessities, of the reading/writing life in our time. About The Dancing Mind. Toni Morrison is the author of eleven novels, from The Bluest Eye (1970) to God Help the Child (2015).

Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art. Very often in our art, the art of words.

On the occasion of her acceptance of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters on the sixth of November, 1996, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison speaks with brevity and passion to the pleasures, the difficulties, the necessities, of the reading/writing life in our time.
  • Kazracage
Wanted to add this book to my collection. I really enjoyed reading it and would tell family and friends to order a copy.

Thank you!
  • Eigeni
One of the best speeches you'd ever want to read or listen to....I have listened to it many many times over---exquist writing and insiration.

roma guy
  • Felolak
"The Dancing Mind" is not your typical book. It is not a fiction book, nor is it really a non-fiction book. "The Dancing Mind" is a speech Toni Morrison gave when she accepted The National Book Foundation Medal. This is a very slim volume, coming in at only 17 pages, but it is an opportunity to read something that I never would have encountered anywhere else.
Toni Morrison gave two unrelated anecdotes, but tied them together at the end of the speech. The first was a story of a young man from an affluent family. He grew up being forced to read certain book and participate in certain activities, and when he was finally out of school, he had no inclination to ever read another book. The only experience of reading he had was for an assignment and for a grade, and never for pleasure. The second story was of a woman writer and approached her, telling Morrison of the difficulty of writing honest literature while living in a country that would suppress literature.
The only connection between the two is that the both deal with books, one from the reader's perspective, the other from the author's. Morrison combines these two into a brief discussion on the necessity of reading and writing, and the enjoyment that can be found from each, and how these are necessary despite (or perhaps, because) of how much of an industry books has become.
This is such a short speech that it won't take up much time to read it, and I think I heard the cadences of Morrison's speaking voice while reading the text. I would imagine that hearing Morrison give the speech would be a superior experience over reading it, but I'm glad that I read it. This is an acceptance speech, but it gives an insight into the mind of Toni Morrison.
  • Ese
Acceptance speeches can be dull affairs. Those in attendance are expected to politely tolerate the honorer's remarks as they drone on and on about nothing. Such is not the case with Toni Morrison's acceptance speech for the National Book Foundation Medal. Ms Morrison's words are powerful, poignant and challenging. What she has to say is worth our attention and action.
Entitled, "The Dancing Mind", Toni Morrison's brief speech points out two dangerous environments that readers and writers
face in today's world. The first is the attitude that reading is a means to an end (merely for obtaining a trophy) and the second, that writing is a subversive activity that needs to be suppressed. She shares with us two anecdotes which illustrate these negative environments and issues a challenge to the Book World.
Morrison challenges the book industry to become a conduit of dispensing knowledge to both the entitled and dispossessed. In doing so minds will be able to engage one another. She also puts out the call for the industry to foster a supportive environment for the writer free of private, governmental or cultural controls. Developing such a peace is one in which all of those in the book business should aspire.
Her words forces us to move beyond reading for the purpose of taking a test or because it is a class assignment. We're sensitized to the fact that many writers are under oppressive regimes. A written word from them would mean a death sentence. Our reading and writing is a serious business and we who engage in the free sharing of thought need to take it seriously.
Although this slim volume is only seventeen pages it is well worth having in your collection of Morrison's works. It is also a great gift book for those who want to engage their dancing minds.
  • Yramede
"The Dancing Mind" (book version) contains the text of a speech delivered by Toni Morrison in 1996, when she accepted the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. While the speech seems a bit short to justify publication as an independent book (the text of the speech does not even take up 11 pages), this is still an admirable work by a great writer.
Morrison's topics in this speech are the joys and struggles of the reading/writing life. She recalls two very different individuals. The first is a student from a privileged background who had never learned "to be alone with a book he was not assigned to read, a book on which there was no test," and who had to force himself to develop this skill. The second individual is a woman living in a country where women who write "against the grain" face terrible persecution.
Ultimately, Morrison celebrates the efforts of the book world to make it possible for all "to experience one's mind dancing with another's" through the act of reading. This small book is a must for admirers of Morrison, and should be of value to all who have a commitment to the interlocking worlds of reading and writing.
  • Neol
The auto cassette of this wonderfully poetic acceptance speech was given to me as a gift and ranks among my all time favorites. In her acceptance of the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, Morrison elaborates on the reader-writer relationship, symbolized in terms of a dance of open minds. She expounds on the importance of an education that allows for and encourages students to (through literature) dance in the company of their own mind. The Nobel Laureate then shares a personal encounter with a fellow female writer from Strasbourg whose country rewards creative and nonrestrictive writing with persecution and imprisonment; the effect of which on the writing soul is indistinguishable from literally being shot down on the street. Morrison wraps up her speech with a personal account of what it means for her to write, to engage in a dance with her mind and the mind of her reader. This speech, like everything she writes, is both captivating and enlightening. The knowledge given is as powerful and elegant as the delivery. Whether you listen to it or read it, this speech is worth knowing. Enjoy.