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by Apuleius,Jack Lindsay

Download The Golden Ass eBook
ISBN:
0253200369
Author:
Apuleius,Jack Lindsay
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Indiana University Press (June 2005)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1790 kb
FB2 book:
1205 kb
DJVU:
1239 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
446


The Golden Ass was composed in Latin by Lucius Apuleius around 180 CE. It is the only ancient Latin fable that has survived

After a long period as an ass, a female god helps him return to his human shape and he decides to become a priest to the gods. The original name of the book was The Transformation of Lucius, which the Christian leader Augustine called The Golden Ass. Both names refer to Lucius being transformed into an ass though magic.

The Metamorphoses of Apuleius, which Augustine of Hippo referred to as The Golden Ass (Asinus aureus), is the only ancient Roman novel in Latin to survive in its entirety. The protagonist of the novel is called Lucius

The Metamorphoses of Apuleius, which Augustine of Hippo referred to as The Golden Ass (Asinus aureus), is the only ancient Roman novel in Latin to survive in its entirety. The protagonist of the novel is called Lucius. At the end of the novel, he is revealed to be from Madaurus, the hometown of Apuleius himself. The plot revolves around the protagonist's curiosity (curiositas) and insatiable desire to see and practice magic.

Apuleius, Jack Lindsay (Translator, introduction). Claudio Annaratone (translator). 997. Metamorphoses The Golden Ass, Lucius Apuleius The Metamorphoses of Apuleius, which St. Augustine referred to as The Golden Ass (Asinus aureus), is the only ancient Roman novel in Latin to survive in its entirety.

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Apuleius, Jack Lindsay. Place of Publication by Apuleius . The Fast 800 by Michael Mosley Paperback Book 3 Day Express Delivery. Place of Publication by Apuleius 0253200369 -The Golden Ass (Indiana University Greek and Latin Cl. .by Apuleius 0253200369. Free postage by Apuleius 0253200369 -The Golden Ass (Indiana University Greek and Latin Cl.

Notes:, converted to pdf and epub from azw3, with background changed to textured paper, missing cover added, b/w maps colored, and text justified.

The Golden Ass by Apuleius is a unique, entertaining, and thoroughly readable Latin novel - the only work of fiction in Latin to have survived in entirety from antiquity.

Golden Ass rare book for sale

Golden Ass rare book for sale. One of world literature’s true masterpieces, The Golden Ass is a satirical and fantastic moral romance, the adventures of one Lucius, who is transformed into an ass, and under that disguise, has the amplest opportunities of observing, undetected, the preposterous doings of mankind.

Apuleius was a student of Platonist philosophy and Latin prose writer who produced the novel Metamorphoses, more popularly known as The Golden Ass. This work is the only Latin novel to survive in its entirety. Adapted from an earlier Greek story, The Golden Ass tells of the adventures of Lucius, a young man who is obsessed with magic

A frank and vivid modern version of one of the most diverting of all classics. Lindsay’s translation captures the genuine flavor, sharp dialogue, outrageous humor, racy delight and subtle style of Apuleius’ sophisticated masterpiece.

  • Anaginn
“The Golden Ass” was composed in Latin by Lucius Apuleius around 180 CE. It is the only ancient Latin fable that has survived. The story is about Lucius who travels from place to place in the beginning and end of the tale as a human, but in the middle as an ass, and encounters many people and goes through over a half dozen adventures and hears over half a dozen stories most of which are amusing and deal with sex with women and with beasts, drinking, crimes, and magic, the latter of which Lucius states interests him. Indeed, it was this interest that led to him being transformed into an ass. He had wanted to be turned into a bird, but he ingested the wrong potion. He is transformed into an ass and transferred or sold from one person to another and taken from place to place by various people, including robbers, to carry heavy loads. He is often mistreated. He hears people tell many stories, including the famed fairy tale of Cupid and Psyche (which I reviewed on Amazon). After a long period as an ass, a female god helps him return to his human shape and he decides to become a priest to the gods.
The original name of the book was “The Transformation of Lucius,” which the Christian leader Augustine called “The Golden Ass.” Both names refer to Lucius being transformed into an ass though magic. Augustine wrote in his “City of God,” 18:18, that while he believed in demons and that they had power over humans, they do not transform humans into animals, and the idea that it can be done though magic, as Apuleius asserts, is superstition. Yes, the story is not true. It is a fable and it is fun to read.
  • Gold as Heart
A mordantly brilliant early Roman novel which is in fact, an update of Lucian's Transformations. Apuleius has infused this brief myth with a plethora of grotesque and imaginative anecdotes--The Cupid and Psyche myth have repeatedly been noted as the originary form of all "Beauty and the Beast" myths. We see here an incredibly modern, heterogeneous combination of violence, satire, and religious fervor all affixed to the metamorphosed peregrinations of an ass, injected with repeated themes of ancient barbarism and dolor. Book XI is an unprecedented rupture in narrative structure--the conversion ritual to the Goddess Isis, and then curiously, to Osiris, remains one of the richest testaments to that ancient cult in all of literature. Along with the Satyricon, The Golden Ass lies at the apex of Roman prose. Robert Graves' translation is highly colloquial.
  • Bluddefender
This is a review of the Robert Graves translation. I can not read Latin, so I have no idea what the experience is like. I understand that it is written in extremely ornate prose. The Graves translation is crystal clear and rather spare. Some modern translations are slangy, which may indeed convey some of Apuleius' personality, but overly modern usages tend to pull me out of the story. Other translations are grave and "classical." Since this is a story of sex, black magic, action, and violence, too formal a rendition spoils the fun. In my opinion, Graves gets it just right.
  • Duzshura
The only other Roman novel I had read before picking up The Golden Ass was Petronius's novel The Satyricon which I found to be rather dull and slow going. No doubt that is largely due to the fact that we no longer possess The Satyricon in it's entirety, and it is difficult to get any sense of narrative continuity from the fragments we do possess. When I decided to read Apuleius's The Golden Ass, however, I was prepared for another slow, dull read. But I was pleasantly surprised.

This book has a number of qualities which recommend it when considered purely from a literary standpoint. First, the story itself is highly entertaining and is composed of a series of vignettes as the main character, Lucius, after being transformed into an ass, makes his way from one inevitably cruel master to another, and manages to narrowly escape death on a number of occasions. Secondly, Apuleius's tale gives us a glimpse into the wide variety of characters who were resident within the Roman empire at the time Apuleius was writing, as well as their manner of life, which is fascinating. And the last thing that recommends this novel purely as literature is it's humor which nearly every reviewer has drawn attention to.

But this book is more than "just literature" in the usual sense of that word. Ultimately this is a book about religious conversion and I was surprised to find myself as I read comparing it to Augustine's Confessions. I was also surprised by the profundity of the theology expressed in certain passages of the story. For example, at one point in the story Lucius has fallen in with a group of eunuchs who have devoted themselves to the worship of some nameless goddess. In devotion to her the eunuchs engage in all sorts of self-flagellation and work themselves up into a self-induced frenzy which they apparently consider a sign of divine immanence. As Lucius is watching all of this he thinks, "A strange notion, this, that divine immanency, instead of doing men good, enfeebles or disorders their senses" (pg. 190). This struck me as a fairly profound theological statement. It also struck me as very Platonic, and I was happy to have my suspicions about a possible Platonic influence on Apuleius's theology confirmed in Robert Graves's introduction.

I was also struck by the obvious and genuine depth of religious feeling expressed in the book, and which appears especially in Apuleius's description of the revelation of Isis at the end of the book. This description reminded me to some degree of a fragment of a relief that is depicted in Jane Harrison's Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion and which I believe was meant to represent Aphrodite emerging from the sea. I think the same beauty, radiance, and depth of religious feeling suffuses both Apuleius's description of the revelation of Isis and the relief of Aphrodite emerging from the sea. After studying both I do not find it hard to understand why many of the Romantic poets, such as Keats, turned to pagan religion for poetic inspiration. Isis's description of herself in Apuleius's account also reminded me to some degree of Krishna's description of himself in the Bhagavad Gita. So there is a lot in this book, and it is well worth the read!

Because of passages like the ones I quoted above I would recommend this book not only to those looking for a fun or entertaining read, but to anyone who is interested in the history of religion and Greek and Roman religion in particular. And I would recommend it especially to anyone who is under the illusion that pagan religion was nothing but an elaborate set of supersitions lacking in any real theological insight, or genuine sense of religious devotion. This book proves otherwise, and more than anything this work has reawoken an interest in me in studying both Greek and Roman religion and their theologies.