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Download Soap (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) eBook

by Francis Ponge,Lane Dunlop

Download Soap (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) eBook
ISBN:
0804729549
Author:
Francis Ponge,Lane Dunlop
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Stanford University Press; 1 edition (July 1, 1998)
Pages:
104 pages
EPUB book:
1346 kb
FB2 book:
1532 kb
DJVU:
1579 kb
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Rating:
4.9
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807


Soap (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) Paperback – July 1, 1998

Soap (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) Paperback – July 1, 1998. by Francis Ponge (Author), Lane Dunlop (Translator). The poet Francis Ponge (1899-1988) occupied a significant and unchallenged place in French letters for over fifty years, attracting the attention and admiration of generations of leading intellectuals, writers, and painters, a notable feat in France, where reputations are periodically reassessed and undone with the arrival of new literary and philosophical schools. Soap occupies a crucial, pivotal position in Ponge’s work.

Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics). The translator here was Lane Dunlop. It's basically Ponge taking up soap again and again. In the words of Serge Gavronsky, "this work, perhaps one of the longest running metaphors in literature, slowly unwinds, bubbles in verbal inventions, and finally evaporates, leaving the water slightly troubled, slightly darker, but the hands clean, really clean.

Translation by Lane Dunlop:. Dunstan Martin, Graham "Ponge, Francis", The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French, ed. Peter France. London:Jonathan Cape (1969).

Meridian: crossing aesthetics. Religion in the american west.

Written by Francis Ponge, Translated by Lane Dunlop. Series Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics. Written by Kafu Nagai, Translated by Lane Dunlop. Stanford University Press. Nagai Kafu was one of the most important Japanese writers of fiction during the first half of the 20th century.

I read this book for a graduate seminar on the philosophy of art. Kant is one of the major figures in expression theory. What we understand as aesthetics changed only recently. Kant astutely argues that one can't argue towards an aesthetic judgment like in logic, aesthetics is subjective but he wants humans to be able to say; "this painting is beautiful, and not just to m. Important point: is there such a thing as subjective universality? This is his dilemma, although he thinks there is if you can use the principle of "disinterest.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Meridian Crossing Aesthetics: The Birth to Presence .

There are criss-cross lacers; the neat brisk people who like a pattern under the surface. There are straight-lacers; who pretend to be tougher than they are but when they come undone, boy, are they undone. t falling for the apple. We sat up on deck today, Gabriel Angel and myself. She told me she was born in 1937, the day that Amelia Earhart had become the first woman to complete the Atlantic crossing, solo flight.

Francis Ponge has been called the poet of things because simple objects .

Francis Ponge has been called the poet of things because simple objects like a plant, a shell, a cigarette, a pebble, or a piece of soap are th. Le Savon (poetry), Gallimard, 1967, translation by Lane Dunlop published as Soap, J. Cape (London), 1969. Two Prose Poems, translated from the French by Peter Hoy, Black Knight Press, 1968. Rain: A Prose Poem, translated from the French by Peter Hoy, Poet & Printer, 1969. With Pierre Descargues and Edward Quinn) Picasso de Draeger,Draeger, 1974.

". . . And now, dear reader, for your intellectual toilet, here is a little piece of soap. Well handled, we guarantee it will be enough. Let us hold this magic stone." The poet Francis Ponge (1899-1988) occupied a significant and unchallenged place in French letters for over fifty years, attracting the attention and admiration of generations of leading intellectuals, writers, and painters, a notable feat in France, where reputations are periodically reassessed and undone with the arrival of new literary and philosophical schools. Soap occupies a crucial, pivotal position in Ponge's work. Begun during the German occupation when he was in the Resistance, though completed two decades later, it determined, according to Ponge, the form of almost all his postwar writing. With this work, he began to turn away from the small, perfect poem toward a much more open form, a kind of prose poem which incorporates a laboratory or workshop, recounting its own process of coming into being along with the final result. The outcome is a new form of writing, which one could call "processual poetry." Ponge's later work, from Soap on, is a very important tool in the questioning and rethinking of literary genres, of poetry and prose, of what is literature. There is a blurring of boundaries between Soap and soap (which was hard to come by during the Resistance and is also, of course, metaphorical for a larger social restitution). Soap contains the sum of Ponge's aesthetics and materialist ethics and his belief in the supremacy of language as it becomes the object of the text. In the words of Serge Gavronsky, "this work, perhaps one of the longest running metaphors in literature, slowly unwinds, bubbles in verbal inventions, and finally evaporates, leaving the water slightly troubled, slightly darker, but the hands clean, really clean. . . . Out of murky literary habits, Ponge has devised a way of cleaning his text, and through it, man himself, his vocabulary, and as a consequence, his way of being in the world."