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by Jenny Uglow,Elizabeth Gaskell

Download Lois the Witch (Hesperus Classics) eBook
ISBN:
1843910497
Author:
Jenny Uglow,Elizabeth Gaskell
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hesperus Press; Only Single-Volume edition (May 1, 2003)
Pages:
112 pages
EPUB book:
1467 kb
FB2 book:
1416 kb
DJVU:
1852 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
303


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Lois the Witch (Hesperus. Selfish to the end, her aunt "summoned her to meet her at the judgement-seat, and answer for this deadly injury done to both souls and bodies of those who had taken her in, and received her when she came to them an orphan and a stranger.

Items related to Lois the Witch (Hesperus Classics). Elizabeth Gaskell, Jenny Uglow (Foreword). Book Description Hesperus Press. Elizabeth Gaskell Lois the Witch (Hesperus Classics). ISBN 13: 9781843910497. Lois the Witch (Hesperus Classics). English novelist and short story writer Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell is known for her biography of Charlotte Bronte. Her works emanate human passions and express reflections on various aspects of society. She wrote for Thomas Hardy's magazine in later life. Published by Hesperus Press (2003). ISBN 10: 1843910497 ISBN 13: 9781843910497.

The intro by Jenny Uglow is illuminating as well.

Elizabeth Gaskell writes so descriptive and you really imagine yourself there also giving depths to the characters. The intro by Jenny Uglow is illuminating as well. It follows Lois Barclay who finds herself thrust into the Salem home of distant relatives she's never met after the death of her parents.

Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (née Stevenson; 29 September 1810 – 12 November 1865), often referred to as Mrs Gaskell, was an English novelist, biographer and short story writer. Her novels offer a detailed portrait of the lives of many strata of Victorian society, including the very poor, and are of interest to social historians as well as lovers of literature. Her first novel, Mary Barton, was published in 1848

The intro by Jenny Uglow is illuminating as well. It follows Lois Barclay who finds herself thrust into the Salem home of distant relatives she's never met after the death of her parents

The intro by Jenny Uglow is illuminating as well.

Lois the Witch by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (Paperback, 2003). Foreword by. Jenny Uglow. Only Single Volume Ed.

Published as a Penguin Red Classic 2008.

Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Cross Street, Manchester. For the first sixteen years of her marriage, she combined the activities of motherhood, and the management of a busy household, with parish work in an area notorious for its poverty and appalling living conditions. Published as a Penguin Red Classic 2008.

Jenny Uglow (foreword). Manufacturer: Hesperus Press Ltd Release date: 29 May 2003 ISBN-10 : 1843910497 ISBN-13: 9781843910497. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Foreword by Jenny Uglow. Lois the Witch 100 pages Hesperus Classics Series. Recently orphaned, Lois is forced to leave the English parsonage that had been her home and sail to America. A God–fearing and honest girl, she has little to concern her in this new life. Yet as she joins her distant family, she finds jealousy and dissension are rife, and her cousins quick to point the finger at the imposter. Set against the backdrop of the Salem witch hunts, Elizabeth Gaskell's somber novella reveals much about the complicity of mankind. Foreword by Jenny Uglow.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Elizabeth Gaskell, Anne Taranto (introduction).

Set against the backdrop of the Salem witch hunts, Elizabeth Gaskell’s somber novella reveals much about the complicity of mankind. Recently orphaned, Lois is forced to leave the English parsonage that had been her home and sail to America. A God-fearing and honest girl, she has little to concern her in this new life. Yet as she joins her distant family, she finds jealousy and dissension are rife, and her cousins quick to point the finger at the “imposter.” With the whole of Salem gripped by a fear of the supernatural, it seems her new home is where she is in most danger. Lonely and afraid, the words of an old curse return to haunt her. Collaborator and friend of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins, Elizabeth Gaskell is a leading figure in Victorian literature.
  • Mogelv
Oh my goodness. Not sure what Elizabeth was thinking when she wrote this one. It's depressing and not like anything else I've read by her. Glad I read it, but it's not a book I'll hang on to and reread.
  • Invissibale
I rated it five star, that is enough, enough, enough, enough, enough. If you want ratings, the stars should be enough!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • Gralsa
The well-educated wife of a Unitarian minister in Victorian Manchester, Elizabeth Gaskell must have understood the dangers of misused Christianity and religious intolerance in a closed community. In Lois the Witch, uncertainty surrounds Salem--deep forests, wild animals, and Indians who are thought to be savage pawns of Satan. In the midst of that untamed wilderness is a town full of people trying to be what they believe to be godly, each of whom lives in fear that he or she may not be among the chosen, the predestined of God.

Into this repressed, volatile setting arrives Lois Barclay, a young, attractive, pious English Anglican whose parents have died and who has come to live with her Puritan uncle and his family. Lois is different from her new family in every way. While she is warm, affectionate, empathetic, and genuinely and effortlessly godly, she soon discovers that her aunt is cold and proud ("Godly Mr Cotton Mather hath said that even he might learn of me; and I would advise thee rather to humble thyself"). Her older daughter, misnamed Faith, for she is agnostic, is both obsessive and unexpressive, and her younger daughter, misnamed Prudence, is sadistic and vicious. More disturbingly, her son, in his early twenties and unmarried, sees visions and hears voices, and not surprisingly, focuses his long-repressed sexuality on the gentle, attractive newcomer.

Haplessly, Lois becomes the focal point for this family's frustrations, fears, desires, jealousies, and, finally, hatred. She, like many of the "witches," is a victim of being different in a conformist society that is both filled with unfulfilled desires and afraid of the unknown.

In Gaskell's Salem, selfishness is rife. Lois's uncle "cried like a child, rather at his own loss of a sister whom he had not seen for more than twenty years, than at that of the orphan's [sic] standing before him, trying hard not to cry . . ." The son, Manasseh, is interested only in his own visions and "his own sick soul," while Prudence "only seemed excited to greater mischief" by the attention generated by her cruelties. This selfishness seems to be the natural result of a belief system in which the fate of one's soul is painfully uncertain and in which one is surrounded by evil. Selfishness and a desperate sense of self-preservation help to explain the moral blindness and the inability to look objectively within as the accusations start to flow and are willingly, almost eagerly, accepted as fact.

Sexual repression leads to fascination with the very subject. When Lois goes to the common pasture (on the edge of the forest where evil dwells), her thought is of a story in which a double-headed snake, "in the service of the Indian wizards," lures white maidens "to seek out some Indian man, and must beg to be taken into his wigwam, abjuring faith and race forever." To the white maidens of Gaskell's Salem, such tales hold terror and promise.

In the 86 pages of Lois the Witch, Gaskell succinctly sets the stage, defines the characters and the critical relationships, and shows how every innocent act and word are used against the bewildered Lois, whose fear is that she will have to share her cell with a real witch--because she too succumbs to the general paranoia. Selfish to the end, her aunt "summoned her to meet her at the judgement-seat, and answer for this deadly injury done to both souls and bodies of those who had taken her in, and received her when she came to them an orphan and a stranger." Ironically, it is the selfless Lois, who left England so she would not be the cause of a quarrel between her lover and his wealthy father, who, like Christ, pays the price for the sins of others.

Gaskell has taken a complex sociological matter, the Salem witch trials, and humanized it. This is a tiny gem of a story that leaves a deep impression.
  • Qudanilyr
As always, I find disturbing anything that I read about the Salem witch period of history. Gaskell paints a fantastic picture of the mindset that created the hysteria that unfairly destroyed the lives of many innocent people. This is an example of religious zealotry having a poisonous influence on a society.

It was a short story that was more of an appalling history lesson than a gripping tale. But as usual, it was very well-written. I particularly enjoyed the author's voice in providing social commentary about the hypocrisy of decent society. Gaskell always amazes me with her level of intelligence and awareness of social injustices.

This version of the book was not the greatest because it is loaded with typos that proved distracting but all in all, it was a very worthy book.
  • Nikok
Lois the Witch, by Elizabeth Gatskell, has long been forgotten in catalogues such as I sight (Australia) but it is a worthy classic. The copy I received is an excellent production. BUT, most valuable from an historian's (and even psychologist's) view, is the invaluable 'Foreword' by Jenny Uglow.
Thankyou, Amazon, for 'finding' me this recent 2003 edition of Elizabeth Gatskell's 1859 work.
Regards Lois Baglin.
(PS I do not claim to be a witch - only an 'independent historian' !)