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Download The Happiness of Getting It Down Right: Letters of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, 1945-1966 eBook

by William Maxwell

Download The Happiness of Getting It Down Right: Letters of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, 1945-1966 eBook
ISBN:
0679446591
Author:
William Maxwell
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Knopf; 1st edition (May 21, 1996)
Pages:
282 pages
EPUB book:
1490 kb
FB2 book:
1325 kb
DJVU:
1114 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
887


Letters between William Maxwell and Frank O'Connor provides a portrait of an enduring friendship and a study of. .Given the literary reputations of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, I was expecting a little more than letters basically trading family details

Letters between William Maxwell and Frank O'Connor provides a portrait of an enduring friendship and a study of the inner life of the writer. From the Inside Flap. Given the literary reputations of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, I was expecting a little more than letters basically trading family details. There are a couple of gems, but they are few. I would only purchase the volume if you were a devoted fan of these writers.

letters of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, 1945-1966. William Maxwell has been married for over 50 years to the former Emily Noyes. They met at the New Yorker when she applied for a job.

A moving, witty collection of correspondence between William Maxwell and Frank O'Connor provides a fascinating portrait of a rich and enduring friendship and a study of the inner life of the writer from the perspective of two literary giants. 15,000 first printing. The happiness of getting it down right: letters of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, 1945-1966. The couple has two daughters.

I could read William Maxwell's letters forever and be happy. He was perhaps Ireland's most complete man of letters, best Frank O’Connor (born Michael Francis O'Connor O'Donovan) was an Irish author of over 150 works, who was best known for his short stories and memoirs. And Frank O'Connor, whom I have never read, was a delight to discover through his correspondence with Bill. Raised an only child in Cork, Ireland, to Minnie O'Connor and Michael O'Donovan, his early life was marked by his father's alcoholism, indebtness and ill-treatment of his mother.

For-Sincerely William Maxwell. Maxwell has initialed the note "W. M. " Unread copy in Fine condition in a Fine dustjacket. Note in Fine condition. Actual image of the book; not a stock photo. Bookseller: REVERE BOOKS, abaa & ioba

Inscribed by Maxwell on the illustrated free endpage. For - Sincerely William Maxwell. Items related to THE HAPPINESS OF GETTING IT DOWN RIGHT Home Maxwell, William THE HAPPINESS.

Inscribed by Maxwell on the illustrated free endpage. Maxwell has initialed the note ". Unread copy in Fine condition in a Fine dustjacket. Items related to THE HAPPINESS OF GETTING IT DOWN RIGHT Home Maxwell, William THE HAPPINESS OF GETTING IT DOWN RIGHT. The happiness of getting IT down right.

THE HAPPINESS OF GETTING IT DOWN RIGHT Letters of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, 1945-1966 .

So wrote Frank O'Connor to William Maxwell in July 1945, confirming that the characters in a story of his called "My Da" were not modeled on living individuals who could sue for libel. And so, at least in the correspondence that survives, began the friendship whose rich and subtle colors are displayed in "The Happiness of Getting It Down Right: Letters of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, 1945-1966.

Letters between William Maxwell and Frank O'Connor provides a portrait of an enduring friendship and a study of the inner life of the writer. ISBN13:9780679446590. Release Date:May 1996.

O'Connor, Frank, 1903-1966 - Correspondence. Maxwell, William, 1908- - Correspondence. New Yorker (New York, . Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. 1925), Authors, Irish - 20th century - Correspondence.

Frank O’Connor (born Michael Francis O'Connor O'Donovan) (17 September 1903 - 10 March 1966) was an Irish writer . New York: Knopf, 1996.

Frank O’Connor (born Michael Francis O'Connor O'Donovan) (17 September 1903 - 10 March 1966) was an Irish writer, author of over 150 works. Best known for his short stories and memoirs, he was also a translator of traditional Irish poetry. New York: Knopf, 1996

With 8 pages of photographs
  • Akinohn
I've read two other collections of letters by William Maxwell -- between Maxwell and Eudora Welty and between Maxwell and Sylvia Townsend Warner. I'm only about halfway through this one, but I would say it's my "least favorite," but that doesn't mean it's bad. Part of it is that this collection (which is obvious from the ordering of the names in the title) is more interested in Frank O'Connor than William Maxwell, and I care more about Maxwell. However, the correspondence in this collection goes deeper into the writing/editing process. Maxwell discussing writing and sends edits, rejections, acceptances, in all three books, but this one seems to contain more of it, which is always interesting.
  • Rrd
Much information here--Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell correspondence--well done.
  • crazy mashine
Given the literary reputations of Frank O'Connor and William Maxwell, I was expecting a little more than letters basically trading family details. There are a couple of gems, but they are few. I would only purchase the volume if you were a devoted fan of these writers.
  • Lestony
This isn't a thick book, because there just aren't that many letters between Maxwell and O'Connor. I only picked it up because, after reading a few of O'Connor's short stories, I immediately decided that I needed to read every word that was ever written by or about this man. Except for one lousy biography, I didn't regret the time at all.
But this, honestly, isn't a great collection. The letters start out rather dry, and even as they get more affectionate, you still don't feel like there's any meat there. They discuss their families, and how much they like them, and how badly they want to see each other - but regarding their opinions on anything else, or an idea of how they went about writing their works, one gets very little: a lot of frustration about writer's block and some comments that are only useful if you're already familiar with Maxwell's novels (I've only read So Long See You Tomorrow, which isn't mentioned in this book) and O'Connor's later New Yorker stories. And - except for The Ugly Duckling, a story that Maxwell inexplicably didn't like - most of O'Connor best work did not come in this period. The most moving part of the correspondence, actually, comes when his creativity starts to dry up - and anyone that has read his Collected Stories can feel his genius exhausting itself towards the end.
A lot of it, too, just reads like little notes passed between friends - I imagine they saved their weightier ideas for when they could see each other, or could have long conversations on the phone. None of them have the literary feel that Chekhov's letters do - those are works of art, as letters often were when it was hard to see people face to face or just pick up the phone. The letters are often just summaries of events - this story is going well, this one not so well, the kids are fine - that were updates between friends: they're not interesting for an outsider, unless you're curious whether the family lives of happily married writers are as ordinary as ours (yes, they are - all happy families do indeed ressemble each other).
The part of this book still sharp in my memory is the remembrance that Maxwell wrote of O'Connor after he died. It's just a few pages, but the weight of years of affection and respect are there. A beautiful piece of writing. And one meant to be read - which is more than I can say, I'm afraid, for the letters. Spend your time on their books: you'll get a better sense of what their lives were about.