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Download The Blue Estuaries: Poems, 1923-1968 eBook

by Louise Bogan

Download The Blue Estuaries: Poems, 1923-1968 eBook
ISBN:
0880011920
Author:
Louise Bogan
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Viking Pr (January 1, 1989)
EPUB book:
1804 kb
FB2 book:
1103 kb
DJVU:
1851 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
432


Behind the Bogan poems is a woman, intense, proud, strong-willed. Her poems can be read and reread: they keep yielding new meanings, as all good poetry should.

Behind the Bogan poems is a woman, intense, proud, strong-willed. The ground beat of great tradition can be heard, with the necessary and subtle variations.

Bogan, Louise, 1897-1970. New York, Farrar, Straus & Giroux. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on January 11, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). New York, NY : Ecco Press. Uploaded by ttscribe20. hongkong on April 24, 2018.

The Blue Estuaries contains her five previous books of verse along with a section of uncollected work, fully . This short book contains every poem that Bogan wished preserved, This is less than 130 short lyrics, some of them only a single stanza, the longest only about 3 pages.

The Blue Estuaries contains her five previous books of verse along with a section of uncollected work, fully representing a unique and distinguished contribution to modern poetry over five decades. Bogan's output seems to be inversely related to the intensity of her work. After reading one of these poems, its hard to imagine that they could have been written any other way. You get the sense that altering a single word would be disfiguring.

Blue Estuaries: Poems, 1923-1968

Blue Estuaries: Poems, 1923-1968. Honored, during the course of her literary career, with almost every major poetry award, Louise Bogan (1898-1970) was the poetry critic for The New Yorker for nearly forty years. The Blue Estuaries contains her five previous books of verse along with a section of uncollected work, fully representing a unique and distinguished contribution to modern poetry over five decades.

Publications citing this paper. Making a Living Poetry: The Process of Poetic Vocation in Postwar America.

Louise Bogan (August 11, 1897 – February 4, 1970) was an American poet. Later in Bogan's life, a volume of her collected works, The Blue Estuaries: Poems 1923–1968, was published with such poems as "The Dream" and "Women. She was appointed the fourth Poet Laureate to the Library of Congress in 1945, and was the first woman to hold this title Dictionary of Literary Biography contributor Brett C. Millier described her as "one of the finest lyric poets America has produced.

There was so much to love, I could not love it all; I could not love it enough. louise bogan the blue estuaries: poems 1923-1968 poetry words quote books. Louise Bogan, from After the Persian, The Blue Estuaries: Poems 1923-1968. You will be again as normal and selfish, and heartless as anybody else. Louise Bogan, from The Blue Estuaries: Poems (1923-1968); Evening in the Sanatorium, n. Connect with the author.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

28 poems of Louise Bogan. Still I Rise, The Road Not Taken, If You Forget Me, Dreams, Annabel Lee. Born in Livermore Falls, Maine, in 1897. She attended Boston Girls' Latin School and spent one year. She attended Boston Girls' Latin School and spent one year at Boston University. She married in 1916 and was widowed in 1920. In 1925, she married her second husband, the poet Raymond Holden, whom she divorced in 1937. Her poems were published in the New Republic, the Nation, Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, Scribner's and Atlantic Monthly.

Book by Bogan, Louise
  • Mall
When you compare the mysterious lyricism of her poetry in _Blue Estuaries_ to her clearly-stated letters to Edmund Wilson or Theodore Roethke and others in _A Poet’s Prose_, you might get the impression that two different women are writing, however, there is a tone of loss or reflection in her prose that’s there in her poetry. We can never know what kind of poetry or prose will come from a complex person; whatever the case may be, Bogan’s poems are so individual that no one else could “see” the way she did. Many people will find Bogan too vague, too personal, too psychological. Truly, this is not Yusef Komunyakaa or Luci Tapahonso, but Bogan is powerful indeed. Allow me to explain.

Throughout this volume, Bogan’s poetry has the tone of late autumn, a slow burn presaging the bite of winter. Every line smolders in this slow burn, this season of reflection; every experience is turned over, observing self and others. It’s frightening to cling to every moment as Bogan does, to have every image burn. See “Come, Sleep . . .”: “Do the shadows of these forms and appetites / Repeat, when these lives give over, / In sleep, the rôle of the selfish devourer, / The selfless lover?” (108).

Bogan’s poetry covers much of the same territory as an Existentialist philosopher--before Sartre and Beauvoir; of course, the ideas about existence were in society at large and Bogan lived a lot. See “Evening in the Sanitarium”: “The period of the wildest weeping, the fiercest delusion, is over. / The women rest their tired half-healed hearts; they are almost well” ( 111). Life should not mean so much that a person has a nervous breakdown; but if so, then one should make the most beautiful writing from it.

Bogan also adopts other personae, as in “After the Persian” and “Juan’s Song.” See “Cassandra”: “To me, one silly task is like another. / I bare the shambling tricks of lust and pride. / Song, like a wing, tears through my breast, my side, / And madness chooses out my voice again, / Again. I am the chosen no hand saves: / The shrieking heaven lifted over men, / Not the dumb earth, wherein they set their graves” (33). Wisdom comes to Bogan at last: “Goodbye, goodbye! / There was so much to love, I could not love it all; / I could not love it enough” (117).

In finishing this review, I must say goodbye to _Blue Estuaries_. It’s like saying goodbye to a very old friend, well-known, much appreciated--but a visionary and wise woman whose spirit will endure.

Do look at _A Poet’s Prose_, a book one can never be done with, and compare it to _Blue Estuaries_ and see what a complex mind she had. She certainly knew how to read others. And her letters to other writers show that her evaluation of the writing art was accurate in every instance.
  • Dammy
This short book contains every poem that Bogan wished preserved, This is less than 130 short lyrics, some of them only a single stanza, the longest only about 3 pages. Bogan's output seems to be inversely related to the intensity of her work. After reading one of these poems, its hard to imagine that they could have been written any other way. You get the sense that altering a single word would be disfiguring. Some are a bit obscure but definitely repay careful reading. Several poems have great power and many others contain striking language. Bogan deserves to be more widely read.
  • Trash Obsession
Louise Bogan was a relatively new discovery for me. In some cases she takes us back, in others, she hands us treasure from the past that moves into us today.
  • Matty
By many forgotten, but magnificent still: meter, metaphor, mystery, rhyme, and lyric power.
Bogan deserves a Bishop-like status.
  • one life
I tripped over a a phenomena. Compact, within definite rhyme scheme, nuanced thought and meaning. The woman digs down deep.
  • Steelcaster
A wonderful book fullof fabulous poems by this superb writer!
  • Fesho
By writing with a unique depth, clarity, and simplicity , Bogan elucidates the "mystery of being" in a way that is rare for even the best modern poets but is what poetry is really for.
Louise Bogan, former editor at the New Yorker, was an extraordinary poet. This book contains testimony after testimony to her mastery. Not long ago I wrote to John Serio about one of the poems in this book, and I have copied and pasted my note here: "Last night I read an extraordinary poem by Louise Bogan, "Summer Wish." Perhaps you know it, but the poem is essentially a dialog between two voices, the first of which is cynical, world-weary, reality-oriented, bound by reason, and devoid of poetic sensibilities. The other speaks effusively of lush spring imagery, almost oblivious to the jaundiced pessimism of the first voice. The first voice utters a remarkable line near the end after reciting its own litany of various types of vegetation (some of which are poisonous), and then remarks on these ". . . symbols and poisons / We drink, in fervor, thinking to gain thereby / Some difference, some distinction." This struck me in theme and tone as so Stevensian. If you have not seen this poem, I hope that you find time for it as a close re-reading has repaid me in spades for the effort."

David Sahner
Santa Cruz, California