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Download Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel (Quasi-Novels) eBook

by John Updike

Download Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel (Quasi-Novels) eBook
ISBN:
037540368X
Author:
John Updike
Category:
Humor & Satire
Language:
English
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (October 13, 1998)
Pages:
241 pages
EPUB book:
1274 kb
FB2 book:
1401 kb
DJVU:
1618 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
987


This "Quasi-Novel" lacks two crucial ingredients of a good book: interesting characters and an interesting plot. Very very rarely was anything worth reading, which was disappointing since Updike has such a reputation.

This "Quasi-Novel" lacks two crucial ingredients of a good book: interesting characters and an interesting plot. Whole sections seem like nothing more than name-dropping, not writing.

Updike's other novels range widely in subject and locale, from The Poorhouse Fair, about a home for the aged that seems to be a microcosm for . Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel Ballantine Books Fawcett Crest Book Fawcett Crest.

Updike's other novels range widely in subject and locale, from The Poorhouse Fair, about a home for the aged that seems to be a microcosm for society as a whole, through The Court (1978), about a revolution in Africa, to The Witches of Eastwick (1984), in which Updike tries to write from inside the sensibilities of three witches. in contemporary New England. The Centaur (1963) is a subtle, complicated allegorical novel that won Updike the National Book Award in 1964.

Series: Quasi-Novels. Hardcover: 241 pages. Bech at Bay is the last in the trilogy of novels about Henry Bech, John Updike's Jewish alter-ego

Series: Quasi-Novels. Bech at Bay is the last in the trilogy of novels about Henry Bech, John Updike's Jewish alter-ego. It lacks some of the prose sparkle of the last two Bech books, and as such, does not quite have the head of steam necessary to fulfill even Updike's modest goals. One is to make us laugh, which he accomplishes sometimes but not nearly enough for our effort and the second is to make observations about art, life, and creativity, which he does in abundance, stretching the believability of the plot and the characters to the breaking point.

Bech at Bay," Updike's third Bech book, contains five crisp short stories about the anxieties and desires of Henry Bech, the "moderately well-known Jewish American writer.

0 a shame this book has passed out of popularity a/k/a a gem waiting to be discovered. Those that didn't appear, like John Irving and John Fowles, garrulously, Dickensianly reacdtionary in method seemed, like John Hawkes and John Barth, smugly, hermetically experimental. Bech at Bay," Updike's third Bech book, contains five crisp short stories about the anxieties and desires of Henry Bech, the "moderately well-known Jewish American writer. Updike is as smart and witty here as ever.

Items related to Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel. Updike, John Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel

Items related to Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel. Updike, John Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel. ISBN 13: 9780449004043. Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel.

John Hoyer Updike was an American writer, poet, literary critic and novelist. John Updike was popular for many of his previous books but he rose to great eminence with his novel ‘Rabbit Run’ that was published in 1960. He was born on 18th March 1932 in Reading, Pennsylvania. Updike was the only child of Wesley Russell Updike, a mathematics teacher and an aspiring writer Linda Grace Hoyer. His mother’s writing passion became a major influence on young John. This book gave birth to one of the most famed American characters of the 20th century; Harry (Rabbit) Angstrom. His story starts in high school where he was appreciated as a terrific basketball player.

splendid new book makes exciting revelations, provides crackling good . A sophisticated novel that contains some of Updike’s best writing.

splendid new book makes exciting revelations, provides crackling good fun, and charts the renewability of life by developing, in supple, resonant prose, the character of an old poop who seems unworthy of his scrutiny. St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Bech at Bay brings readers amusingly up to date on the life and times of Bech, a neurotic Jewish novelist. The writing still shows his famous descriptive luxuriance.

Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel Paperback – October 5, 1999. John Updike has given us a multitude of memorable characters, but none more lovable than the high-minded, mild-mannered, rather hapless writer Henry Bech. Chicago Tribune Witty, acute, and surprisingly affecting. by. John Updike (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Updike at his most interesting and engaging. The Washington Post Book World Bech at Bay is brilliant. From the Inside Flap.

Download Bech at Bay: A Quasi-Novel (Quasi-Novels) PDF. Domenic Leaf.

Photos taken are of the actual item that you will receive.

Henry Bech, the moderately well known Jewish-American writer who served as the hero of John Updike's previous Bech: A Book (1970) and Bech Is Back (1982), has become older but scarcely wiser. In these five new chapters from his life, he is still at bay, pursued by the hounds of desire and anxiety, of unbridled criticism and publicity in a literary world ever more cheerfully crass. He fights intimations of annihilation in still-Communist Czechoslovakia, while promiscuously consorting with dissidents, apparatchiks, and Midwestern Republicans. Next, he succumbs to the temptations of power by accepting the presidency of a quaint and cosseted honorary body patterned on the Académie Française. Then, the reader finds him on trial in California and on a criminal rampage in a gothic Gotham, abetted by a nubile sidekick called Robin. Lastly, our septuagenarian veteran of the literary wars is rewarded with a coveted medal, stunning him into a well-deserved silence. It's not easy being Henry Bech in the post-Gutenbergian world, but somebody has to do it, and he brings to the task an indomitable mixture of grit and ennui.
  • Tinavio
This is the last in Updike's Bech trilogies. Like the others, it is rife with humor, warm humor. Bech continues his adventures as as esteemed author. His career has had his ups and downs, but sees life through his somewhat aged eyes. He has a wry but sane handle on the adventures in his field as he navigates professional meetings, literary parties, adulation from younger writers.
  • Swordsong
Another great Updike book.
  • Small Black
Bech at Bay is the last in the trilogy of novels about Henry Bech, John Updike's Jewish alter-ego. It lacks some of the prose sparkle of the last two Bech books, and as such, does not quite have the head of steam necessary to fulfill even Updike's modest goals. One is to make us laugh, which he accomplishes sometimes but not nearly enough for our effort and the second is to make observations about art, life, and creativity, which he does in abundance, stretching the believability of the plot and the characters to the breaking point.

In the end, I have great ambivalence about the Beck books, and Updike generally. What am I supposed to think of him? There is something slight about these books, even when they are decked out as serious observations of literature and life. Even the comedy is thin and a bit crude, lacking any essential punch. And that is what I want in my fiction. A punch. There are enough lulling, non-essential books and other forms of entertainment out there. I want my fiction to change my world. The Beck series does not come close to this at all.
  • SING
How does one best review a literary genius? This is not going to be easy. Updike is an author I discovered in college, but haven't been seriously reading him since a couple years ago. I devoured "Roger's Version" and his latest short stories, and I didn't know what to expect with the latest Bech book. This is the first of the Bech books I have read. What an amazing book. Updike has a way of describing reality that makes it feel more important..almost surreal.

Bech, Updike's alter-ego, runs loose in this one, even resorting to murder of his least liked critics. If you are looking for very DARK humor, here is where to find it. In this pathetic yet somewhat brilliant character, we find some autobiographic hints about Updike himself I'm sure. Some of his dislike of critics is probably projected into Bech's harsh words. And at one point Bech wonders if he is polluting the world with subtle pornography, maybe something the author wonders about from time to time too.

Perhaps the best part of the book is the end when Bech gives a rambling but very interesting Nobel Prize acceptance speech in Sweden. This is something only Updike could write. He rambles on about mortality, religion, relationships and birth and death. Vintage Updike. He is a world class writer of the highest order.

Jeffrey McAndrew

author of "Our Brown-Eyed Boy"
  • Macill
Henry Bech, Updike's fictional writer, is back in five story length segments. Bech ages from mid-sixties to mid-seventies in the course of the book. In the first story, Bech travels to Czechoslovakia. He visits Kafka's grave, hangs out with the ambassador and his wife,and talks with local writers who are still under the Soviet regime. This story is meandering and the weakest effort in the book. In Bech Presides, the second story of the collection, he criticizes the end of this first story. Bech Presides is the best story in the book. Bech is pressured into heading an old NY literary society. The story is a brilliant combination of hidden motives and a reflection of changing cultural tastes. In the third story, Bech is sued for libel in LA. Bech's conflicting feelings for himself and for the plaintiff make this story succeed. 'Vengeance is mine.' Sayeth the writer, 'I shall repay' is the theme of story number 4, Bech Noir. HB gets back at unfriendly critics in a variety of ways. It's very amusing. Bech wins the Noble Prize in the fifth story. He contemplates Faulkner, but comes closer to Rudy Giuliani when he brings his baby daughter to the podium and lets her say hello. Bech's inability to think of a great speech is complemented by Updike's bland story. Stories 1 & 5, are weaker than 2,3 and 4. But overall Bech at Bay is enjoyable and highly recommended.
  • Mardin
Bech at bay consists of five stories about the life of Henry Bech. He ages from mid-sixties to mid-seventies in the course of the book. The first story has Bech visiting Prague before the comunists have been thrown out. He visits Kafka's grave, hangs out with the ambassador, and talks with the local literary celebs who are still intimidated by the Bolshies. This story is aimless, and the weakest of the five entries. The second is Bech Presides.HB is talked into heading a NY literary organization. It's a brilliant study of cultural trends and hidden motives. It's brilliant, the best of the book. Third, Bech is sued in LA for libel. HB's conflicting feelings about himself and his accuser make this story appealing and engaging. Updike releases rage at unappreciative critics in Bech Noir.(JU, I'm praising the book, no need for vengeance with me.) It's wonderful fantasy at getting back at those who have harmed us. Tip! Use a sponge to seal your mail. Bech wins the Nobel prize in story number five. Bech doesn't know what to say, and uses a Giuliani-like technique at the podium. It's a good story, not great. Overall, stories 1 & 5 are very good. 2,3,4 are brilliant. Please read. Thank you.