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by Vendela Vida

Download And Now You Can Go eBook
ISBN:
1400040272
Author:
Vendela Vida
Category:
Literary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Knopf; 1st edition (August 26, 2003)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1964 kb
FB2 book:
1437 kb
DJVU:
1258 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
432


I know this because, five minutes before, a mother pushing a sleeping girl in a blue stroller had asked me for the time

I know this because, five minutes before, a mother pushing a sleeping girl in a blue stroller had asked me for the time my days were the meekly sunlit rooms of a vacant house. I spent my afternoons in Riverside Park, across the street from my apartment. The trees were tall, and, by December, without birds. In my mind, the story is always in the present, always starting at 2:15. I'm walking along the park's promenade when a man behind me says, "Ma'am?".

Vendela Vida's first novel defies expectations in virtually every way; what looks to be a tale of psychological trauma . And Now You Can Go's narrator is a cool, quirky customer, but she's ever ready to do something generous, something noble, something stamped with grace.

Vendela Vida's first novel defies expectations in virtually every way; what looks to be a tale of psychological trauma, or even revenge, evolves into something much rarer in contemporary fiction: a joyful investigation of the pleasures of living. And Now You Can Go is beguiling, celebratory, and mysterious. A quick, intriguing and often funny examination of trauma, human relationships and modern life.

I picked up this book for two reasons: First, I had really liked Vendela Vida's novel The Diver's Clothes Lie Empty, and second, because I recently read a. .The incredible story that opens And Now You Can Go also happened to Vida.

I picked up this book for two reasons: First, I had really liked Vendela Vida's novel The Diver's Clothes Lie Empty, and second, because I recently read a column by Vida in The New York Times in which she discussed the overlap between truth and fiction. It turns out that the incident of a woman having her bag and Try as I might, I couldn't finish this novel. The opening scene is that a young woman, Ellis, is walking through a park in New York City when a man with a gun approaches her and says he wants to die, but he doesn't want to die alone.

The premise of Vendela Vida's terrific debut novel, And Now You Can Go, seems at first a tad depressing, in a Bernard Goetz .

The premise of Vendela Vida's terrific debut novel, And Now You Can Go, seems at first a tad depressing, in a Bernard Goetz, s kind of way. Th.Ellis, the protagonist in Vendela Vida's book, has a profoundly disturbing experience: a man grabs her in a park, telling her he is going to kill himself, and he does not want to go alone; he is taking her with him. Ellis, trying to convince him there is much to live for, recites poetry to him, since it is art and poetry that transform lives. After persuading the would-be killer and suicide to accompany her to a bookstore, he lets her go.

Vendela Vida's first book, Girls on the Verge–a journalistic study of female initiation rituals–grew out of her .

Vendela Vida's first book, Girls on the Verge–a journalistic study of female initiation rituals–grew out of her MFA thesis at Columbia University. And Now You Can Go is her first novel. Библиографические данные. And Now You Can Go: A Novel. Издание: перепечатанное.

Ellis, a 21 year old student, survives being threatened by a gunman as she walks in her local park in New York but the after-shocks reverberate throughout her personal life. The middle of the story has a completely different setting as Ellis goes to the Philippines with her Mum, which makes the story seem like a three-act play. An easy, yet intriguing read written in a deadpan style. Find similar books Profile. I wonder if all my belongings - the skirt I sewed and spray-painted in high school, my softball bat from sixth grade, the concert ticket stubs I saved - would.

In 2017, Vida was a Lurie Author-in-Residence and instructor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at San Jose State University. She is married to author, Dave Eggers, has two children, and lives in the Bay Area.

Vendela Vida’s fearless, critically acclaimed fiction debut follows the unpredictable recovery of a young . Q: What writers or books influenced you in writing AND NOW YOU CAN GO? A: When I look back at the writers who I’ve read most thoroughly, I’m pretty surprised myself.

Vendela Vida’s fearless, critically acclaimed fiction debut follows the unpredictable recovery of a young woman as she tries to make sense of he. Why have I read everything Philip Roth’s done, for example?

A sharply humorous, fast-paced debut novel about the effects—some predictable, some wildly unexpected—that an encounter at gunpoint can have on the life of a (previously) assured young woman.The gun in question is pointed at twenty-one-year-old Ellis as she walks through a New York City park. In the end she is unrobbed and physically unharmed. But she is left psychologically reeling.Over the next few weeks Ellis keeps everyone at bay: the police, the men who want to save her (“the ROTC boy” poet and “the red-faced representative of the world”), and the university therapist who hints that her sweaters may be too tight. But when Ellis accompanies her mother, a nurse, on a mission to the Philippines, she finds that life—even if held up—cannot be held back, and neither, finally, can she.
  • Gribandis
I picked up An Now You Can Go by Vendela Vida not even knowing she was Dave Eggers' wife. Not saying that matters but it is interesting nonetheless as I realized after reading the book that they have some serious writing capability in that family! The book is a great read and I whipped through it hardly putting it down. The book is narrated by a young woman named Ellis who is walking in Central Park (presumably) one day and is accosted by a man who threatens to kill her. She fends him off by quoting poetry to him and he eventually goes away. At this point, I figured the entire book would be about her relationship with this man but in fact it ended up being more about how she recovered from that incident and processed it and lived with it. Which certainly is a topic that is relevant in society today unfortunately. We learn about her relationship with a series of boyfriends-some just hook ups while others more long term. We examine Ellis' relationship with her mom who is born in Italy and comes to the US to work in an operating room as a nurse. Together they go on a charity mission to the Philippines which in my opinion was one of the more exciting parts of the book. I highly recommend it and if you want an even better Vendela Vida book, go read Let the Northern Lights Erase You which is a 5-star book in my opinion.
  • Tolrajas
Started with her latest book "The Divers Clothes Lie Empty" and I'm hooked on this author.
  • Zeueli
Ellis, a college student, is held at gunpoint in a public park by a man who claims he doesn't want to die alone. It's a beginning that few readers can resist, made all the more interesting by Ellis's response: she distracts the gunman from his deadly plans by babbling about whatever comes to mind--art, poetry, etc. He appears baffled not by her reaction, but by the poetry she recites. He runs off, leaving her unharmed but in shock. The remaining 200 pages describes how she deals with (or rather, doesn't deal with) her ordeal: her father returns after abandoning his family years earlier, Ellis has a number of bland sexual encounters with a handful of equally unremarkable men, while the gunman's shadow lurks in the background. How will her brush with death affect how she interacts with her father? With the men she dates? Vida's story is so rich with possibility, yet she fails to bring anything to a satisfactory conclusion. Undeveloped subplots and a flimsy cast of two-dimensional characters drag the pacing to a crawl. The ending of this forgettable tale, which climaxes with Ellis's second and final confrontation with the gunman, is beyond disappointing. While a regrettable case of first-novel syndrome might be offered as an excuse for this novel's resulting flop, I can only really recommend it to those who are intrigued by Vida's work after seeing the movie Away We Go, which she co-wrote with her husband, Dave Eggers.
  • Prinna
Various reviewers scorn and despise this…because nothing of importance happens after the first unscary crisis where MC is threatened in the Park by a rather sweet unhappy man with a gun and finds she can calm him by reciting poems. Then is made what I think is the major wrong turn and misunderstanding of the story: this episode in the park has a Beginning, Middle and End. Man accosts and threatens, MC copes with it successfully, seeing the essential helplessness and haplessness of this Everyman/Perp and the recitation of poetry acknowledges this. Essentially she forgives him with that choice, she “sees” him which is part of every act of forgiveness if it is authentic. He runs off free to live the second chance she has given him. It is quite lovely. Story over.

But she then starts haemorrhaging reports of the incident to all and sundry, park keeper, door keeper, police, university therapist, parents, friends, acquaintances..precisely as if she had not coped with it, as if she needed help when in fact she handled it perfectly. She spends the next few months processing what she thinks everyone else thinks about what happened, acting out what she thinks they think. In doing this she fails as a Main Character. She does not understand her own experience. She does not know herself. The real problem is that her creator doesn’t understand her either. She has no character although she does have “personality”… an abrupt and astringent, unfiltered, “modern” way of behaving which is, admittedly, quite winsome, if pointless and self-harmish. She deliberately makes herself a weak receptacle for the impositions of what others might think about what she thinks or feels. It’s a hall of mirrors. It’s a documentary about an incident on TV.

But we know there is a decisive and creative problem solver in there. We met her in the first pages and then we never see her again. She hides herself in victimhood although she never actually was one. She is like an actress playing the part of a PTSD sufferer, experimenting with being more undone than she is. She understood, forgave and absolved her perp even as he threatened her (that is what poetry does) thus saving him from committing a ruinous act and then spends the rest of her pages undoing that, not understanding that and taking it back until her gang of jerry-built sex partners, each of whom is weaker and less conscious than she is, bring about the final re-forgiveness scene in the lobby of her own building so that her perp now knows where she lives. Unclosure.

Hmm. Well I guess I still think it is rather brilliant even with all these flaws. This is probably the truth about the way our ramshackle sense of self sometimes metabolizes experience. Or the way American girls do. Glimpses of sunlight but mostly muddling along in a fog of not-knowing. I just think a good novel should shed more sunlight than fog.