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by Paul J. McAuley

Download Red Dust eBook
ISBN:
038077528X
Author:
Paul J. McAuley
Category:
Literary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Avon Books (November 1, 1995)
EPUB book:
1479 kb
FB2 book:
1425 kb
DJVU:
1422 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
904


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Transformed into a reluctant deity by a viral kiss, former Contract Agronomist Technician Wei Lee is set adrift in a terraformed world of cowboys.

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Other AvoNova Books by. Paul J. McAuley. Y. C PAUL J. )4cAUL[Y. William Morrow and Company, Inc. New York AVON BOOKS. A division of The Hearst Corporation 1350 Avenue of the Americas New York, New York 10019. All rights reserved, which includes the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form whatsoever except as provided by the . First Morrow/AvoNova Printing: November 1994.

An extraordinary saga, set somewhat nearer to home than McAuley's remarkable debut, Eternal Light (1993). Red Dust An AvoNova book. Seven hundred years hence, a depopulated Earth is ruled by the Consensus eco- fanatics who.

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Paul J. McAuley (born 23 April 1955) is a British botanist and science fiction author. A biologist by training, McAuley writes mostly hard science fiction. His novels dealing with themes such as biotechnology, alternative history/alternative reality, and space travel.

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by. McAuley, Paul J. Publication date. New York : W. Morrow. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 19, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Hachette UK, Dec 30, 2010 - Fiction - 320 pages. Epic in scope, Red Dust's spectacular, fast-paced story brilliantly brings to life the planet that has captured our imagination like no other. Mars, 600 years in the future, is dying. Five hundred years after the Chinese conquered the Red Planet, the great work of terraforming is failing.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Paul McAuley - The Book of Confluence 01 - Child of the River. Paul Mcauley - Red Dust. Mcauley Paul J. 569 Kb. 788 Kb. 785 Kb. Paul McAuley - The Book of Confluence 02 - Ancients of Days. 857 Kb. 666 Kb.

McAuley's Mars is at once satisfyingly familiar and disquietingly alien: cultural contrasts, persuasive inventions, and constant surprises are set forth with a weird yet compelling logic. An extraordinary saga, set somewhat nearer to home than McAuley's remarkable debut, Eternal Light (1993). Seven hundred years hence, a depopulated Earth is ruled by the Consensus eco- fanatics who allow nothing to change; on Jupiter, a self-aware probe calling itself the King of the Cats broadcasts rock music and propaganda; various dwindling groups of dissenters inhabit the asteroid belt; and Mars, habitable but slowly reverting to dust and drought and populated mostly by Chinese, is ruled.

Transformed into a reluctant deity by a viral kiss, former Contract Agronomist Technician Wei Lee is set adrift in a terraformed world of cowboys, tribal Yankees, and feral children, appointed to be their savior. Reprint.
  • Elizabeth
Red Dust is a novel of a terraformed Mars set about 600 years into the future. A young man named Lee traverses Mars in an adventure of intrigue, surrounded by events that nearly overwhelm him. A young woman drops from space in a small pod to the surface of Mars carrying special viruses which are really nanotech devices, and she infects Lee with them, starting a chain of events beyond Lee's control and immediate understanding. The plot is complicated with many political groups trying to gain control, with their own agendas....sounds familiar, does'nt it! The novel incorporates a couple of cultural icons from our time, it is interesting how they are revered and distorted in this far flung future.
This novel was copyrighted in 1993 so it is one of the earlier novels to use nantechnology as an integral part of the story. Paul McAuley also portrays an artificial reality in which many people choose to die and go to. McAuley writes, it appears to me, that man still struggles with himself, even 600 years into the future, that prophecy is almost sure to come true as we seem to have an innate ability and desire to fight among ourselves.
McAuley in this novel sometimes writes in a vague and discordant manner, which makes reading a bit difficult at times, and a reader has to pay attention to a lot of details to keep proper track of the plot. Also, I personally feel the novel could have been 30-40 pages shorter, as there are long dull stretches here and there.
  • Jack
Despite the science fiction setting Red Dust is basically a quest, with hero Wei Lee seeking to achieve his destiny and discover what happened to his long-lost parents. The story takes place on a Mars colonised by the Chinese, and McAuley depicts this transplanted oriental milieu with style and considerable gusto. There are some striking scenes (Matrix-like fights and Yankee whalers hunting on seas of dust) yet there is not much depth to this imagined world, and Wei Lee is rather too passive to be a convincing hero. Faults notwithstanding, I enjoyed Red Dust and found it an entertaining read.
  • Xig
A book about Mars, should be interesting, right? Wrong! This book starts slow, stays slow and coasts to a stop at turtle speed. It takes the reader awhile to catch on to the social and political climate of the solar system since McAuley doesn't straight out tell you until later. Everyone is chasing Wei Lee because he's a threat to their plans. Gee, really exciting! As you can probably tell, there's not much of a plot. I congratulate myself for the willpower to stay with this book for 400 pages without throwing it in the trash. The book is tedious, very tedious. I recommend it only for insomniacs. A sure cure!
  • Mallador
This book took me longer to read that any other recently, mostly because every chapter or so everything seem to change - new characters etc..). Lots to digest - thoroughly enjoyable... J
  • Blackredeemer
McAuley combines hard SF detail with an ambitious picaresque tale for a novel that feels unique. Very satisfying