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Download The Santaroga Barrier eBook

by Scott Brick,Frank Herbert

Download The Santaroga Barrier eBook
ISBN:
1400164869
Author:
Scott Brick,Frank Herbert
Category:
Literary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (October 20, 2010)
EPUB book:
1570 kb
FB2 book:
1251 kb
DJVU:
1540 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
324


Frank Herbert's most popular works are the well-known Dune books: Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, and the extraordinary bestseller God Emperor of Dune.

Frank Herbert's most popular works are the well-known Dune books: Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, and the extraordinary bestseller God Emperor of Dune.

The Santaroga Barrier is a 1968 science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert

The Santaroga Barrier is a 1968 science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert. Considered to be an "alternative society" or "alternative culture" novel, it deals with themes such as psychology, the counterculture of the 1960s, and psychedelic drugs. It was originally serialized in Amazing Stories magazine from October 1967 to February 1968, and came out in a paperback from Berkley Books later in 1968

The Santaroga Barrier Audiobook. Listen to this book for FREE when you try Audible.

The Santaroga Barrier Audiobook. Scott Brick (Narrator), Frank Herbert (Author), Tantor Audio (Publisher) & 0 more.

The Santaroga Barrier is a 1968 science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert. Considered to be an "alternative society" or "alternative culture" novel, it deals with themes such as psychology, the counterculture of the 1960s, and psychedelic drugs

The Santaroga Barrier is a 1968 science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert. Something very strange is happening in a valley in Southern California.

Tor Books by Frank Herbert. Jenny contained part of Santaroga’s mystery. She was an element of the Santaroga Barrier and a prime subject for his present investigation. Again, Dasein sighed. He wasn’t fooling himself. 1. The sun went down as the five-year-old Ford camper-pickup truck ground over the pass and started down the long grade into Santaroga Valley. A crescent-shaped turn-off had been leveled beside the first highway curve. Gilbert Dasein pulled his truck onto the gravel, stopped at a white barrier fence and looked down into the valley whose secrets he had come to expose. Two men already had died on this project, Dasein reminded himself.

Santaroga had no juvenile delinquency, or any crime at all. Outsiders found no house for sale or rent in this valley . No one bought cigarettes in Santaroga. No cheese, wine, beer, or produce from outside the valley could be sold there. Outsiders found no house for sale or rent in this valley, and no one ever moved out. The list went on and on and grew stranger and stranger. Maybe Santaroga was the last outpost of American individualism. Or maybe there was something extraordinary at work in Santaroga.

The brick building, a pair of swinging glass doors, hands gently guiding him-all seemed rather distant and . All his records had been in there, Dasein realized. Every bit of evidence he’d accumulated about Santaroga had gone up in that fire. Evidence? he thought.

The brick building, a pair of swinging glass doors, hands gently guiding him-all seemed rather distant and receding. I’m blacking out, he thought. He felt it might be extremely dangerous to sink into unconsciousness.

Frank Herbert's Dune is widely known as the science fiction equivalent of The Lord of the Rings. Now The Road to Dune is a companion work comparable to The Silmarillion, shedding light on and following the remarkable development of the bestselling science. Memorable characters from the award-winning Dune trilogy take part in a series of battles-physical, mental, and emotional-on the mysterious desert planet of Dune. Read by Frank Herbert. A spoken word album read by the author. On the Caedmon label no. TC. The Dosadi Experiment (ConSentiency Universe, by Frank Herbert.

The Santaroga Barrier book. Frank Herbert's Santaroga Barrier isn't a phenomenally well written piece, or an incredibly original idea even back then but it is a well written and fleshed out story that I hope one day I will be able to write myself. I'd reccomend it easily to anyone that is a fan of these gritty, hard(ish) fiction tales.

The Santaroga barrier. Frank Herbert's most popular works are the well-known Dune books: Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, and the extraordinary bestseller God Emperor of Dune. Scott Brick has recorded over five hundred audiobooks, won over forty AudioFile Earphones Awards, and twice received Audie Awards for his work. Scott was chosen as Publishers Weekly's 2007 Narrator of the Year, and he has been named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine.

Santaroga seemed to be nothing more than a prosperous farm community. But there was something...different...about Santaroga.Santaroga had no juvenile delinquency, or any crime at all. Outsiders found no house for sale or rent in this valley, and no one ever moved out. No one bought cigarettes in Santaroga. No cheese, wine, beer, or produce from outside the valley could be sold there. The list went on and on and grew stranger and stranger.Maybe Santaroga was the last outpost of American individualism. Maybe they were just a bunch of religious kooks....Or maybe there was something extraordinary at work in Santaroga. Something far more disturbing than anyone could imagine.
  • Doukree
I have read this book on every vacation since discovering it in the 80's. Sadly, my original copy was destroyed when I lost everything in a fire. I can still see the mustard smear from the sandwich I ate while vacationing at Joe Wheeler State Park, the coke stain from a spilled drink onboard a plane headed for D.C. to visit my daughter and the slight crinkle of the pages when I was caught in a sudden shower on the beach at Gulf Shores. When it came time to replace it, I opted for the electronic copy so I would never lose it again. What an amazing book!!! I discovered this after reading the Dune series and rate it #1 in Herbert's novels for re-readability! A true gem.
  • Wrathshaper
Let's face it, "Dune" is fascinating, but there's not a whole lot of fun to be found in its pages. And the follow-ups to "Dune" weren't anywhere near as good as the first book.

But "The Santaroga Barrier" - yes, it's pretty cheesy, as at least one reviewer has noted - but it's a terrific, fun read. Much closer to something Stephen King might have written than the pompous interplanetary muck of "Dune" et al. The small town, the paranoia, the engagingly thick-headed, stubborn, but fundamentally decent hero; the blindsight on the part of the townspeople about themselves; the savage accuracy of Herbert's description of "normal" consumer culture; it's all a great mix. The only Herbert book I've read that approaches it as a quick, clever read is "Whipping Star." (I didn't like "The Dosadi Experiment" nearly as well, though it was OK.)

For years my only copy of this book has been a paperback with the glue completely gone and all the pages separated. I'm so glad I looked to find out if it had been reissued. This book is a treasure, and one of those few - like "Emma" by Jane Austen, "Daniel Martin" by John Fowles, or "The Honorary Consul" by Graham Greene - that I'll delight in rereading periodically for the rest of my life.
  • Felhalar
It's not his greatest work, but it's excellent nonetheless. There was clearly a transition from sounding "literary" to a more accessible prose that happened over the course of Herbert's writing. This seems to fall more towards the "literary" type prose. In all, the concept and the flow of the story were excellent. I'm glad I read it, but I probably won't be reading it again soon, as I have for The Dosadi Experiement and the "Kelp" books.
  • Glei
Science Fiction by Frank Herbert. I don't need to write anymore than that. I wouldn't want to ruin any part of the book for you.
  • BORZOTA
An amazing book, filled with the elaboration and detail of a bygone era. The audio version took me back to a time where my grandparents would've gathered around the radio as their story came on. The detail and style of writing is better than almost any I've ever seen, and the story itself nuanced and filled with cliffhangers.
  • Goltikree
I read this in University and remember it being one of the best books in the Science Fiction course I was taking. However, it is dated. Much more of a mystery novel than a science fiction tale. Would have made a great Movie of The Week. Although I doubt they would have had such concentration on altered states of mind.
  • Cel
I read this ages ago and wanted to re-read it and share it with a friend. The book was as described and delivered in a timely manner.
Stay with this. Awesome. Just as relevant today as when first written! ...... That is all I have to say.