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by Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas,Robert Bringhurst

Download Nine Visits to the Mythworld: Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas (Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers, Vol. 2) eBook
ISBN:
1550548034
Author:
Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas,Robert Bringhurst
Category:
Mythology & Folk Tales
Language:
English
Publisher:
Douglas & McIntyre; 1st edition (March 1, 2001)
Pages:
222 pages
EPUB book:
1807 kb
FB2 book:
1960 kb
DJVU:
1423 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
527


These nine narratives from the Haida mythteller, Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas, are in a realm apart . Robert Bringhurst devoted separate volumes to two great poets, Skaay (I'll leave out the lineage name) and Ghandl. Of the two, Ghandl is the easier.

These nine narratives from the Haida mythteller, Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas, are in a realm apart from ordinary myths and legends. Robert Bringhurst's fine translations are sensitive and elegant, allowing the voice of Ghandl to rise up from the page with full power. His poems are short, focused, intense and memorable. They're often eerie like nightfall on the water.

These nine narratives from the Haida mythteller, Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas, are in a realm apart from . Ghandl dictated the texts-6 hours a day, 6 days a week, for about three weeks-to another Haida man, Henry Moody, who then helped Swanton to translate them to phonetics. Swanton eventually transcribed them into a running prose, but I can't imagine that his prose was anything like the poetic beauty of what appears in this book.

In November 1900, when Ghandl dictated these nine stories, the Haida world lay in ruins. A distinguished Canadian poet and critic, Bringhurst here unveils a literary portrait of the keenly artistic culture native to the islands of Haida Gwaii. Located off the west coast of British. Wave upon wave of smallpox and other diseases, rapacious commercial exploitation by fur traders, whalers and miners, and relentless missionization by the church had taken a huge toll on Haida culture. Yet in the blind poet s mind, the great tradition lived, and in his voice it comes alive.

Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers, vol. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2000. Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers, vol. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Haida myths as told by the storyteller Ghandl. I learned of this book through a list of Bringhurst's works published in his book A Story as Sharp as a Knife: The Classical Haida Mythtellers and Their World, which I read in April 2004. This was printed as a sequel to Story and contained a purer presentation of the stories themselves. Some of the background information was repeated, but this served as a convenient refresher of things I learned from the first book. This one ended with lighter, more Haida myths as told by the storyteller Ghandl.

The nine stories contained in this volume are the finest offerings from one of the last of the traditional Haida storytellers, Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas

The nine stories contained in this volume are the finest offerings from one of the last of the traditional Haida storytellers, Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas. Ghandl was born in 1851 in a small Haida island community off the coast of British Columbia. His world was devastated by waves of European diseases, which wiped out over ninety percent of the Haidas and robbed him of his sight.

Ghandl of the Qayahl Llanas by Robert Bringhurst. Article in L Homme · January 2001 with 31 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. In perturbative quantum field theory the maintenance of classical symmetries is quite often investigated by means of algebraic renormalization, which is based on the Quantum Action Principle. We formulate and prove this principle in a new framework, in causal perturbation theory with localized interactions.

Robert Bringhurst (born October 16, 1946) is a Canadian poet, typographer and author. He is the author of The Elements of Typographic Style – a reference book of typefaces, glyphs and the visual and geometric arrangement of type. He has also translated works of epic poetry from Haida mythology into English.

Swanton met a number of fine mythtellers during his year in the Haida country.

In the Fall of 1900, a young American anthropologist named John Swanton arrived in the Haida country, on the Northwest Coast of North America, intending to learn everything he could about Haida mythology.

In the Fall of 1900, a young American anthropologist named John Swanton arrived in the Haida country, on the Northwest Coast of North America, intending to learn everything he could about Haida mythology. He spent the next ten months phonetically transcribing several thousand pages of myths, stories, histories and songs in the Haida language. Swanton met a number of fine mythtellers during his year in the Haida country. Each had his own style and his own repertoire. Two of them -- a blind man in his fifties by the name of Ghandl, and a crippled septuagenarian named Skaay -- were artists of extraordinary stature, revered in their own communities and admired ever since by the few specialists aware of their great legacy.

Nine Visits to the Mythworld includes all the finest works of one of these master mythtellers. In November 1900, when Ghandl dictated these nine stories, the Haida world lay in ruins. Wave upon wave of smallpox and other diseases, rapacious commercial exploitation by fur traders, whalers and miners, and relentless missionization by the church had taken a huge toll on Haida culture. Yet in the blind poetï??s mind, the great tradition lived, and in his voice it comes alive. Robert Bringhurstï??s eloquent and vivid translations of these works are supplemented by explanatory notes that supply the needed background information, and by photographs of masterworks of Haida visual art, in which the stories Ghandl tells are given potent visual form.

  • Celace
These nine narratives from the Haida mythteller, Ghandl of the Qayahl Llaanas, are in a realm apart from ordinary myths and legends. Robert Bringhurst's fine translations are sensitive and elegant, allowing the voice of Ghandl to rise up from the page with full power.

In 1900, when the anthropologist/linguist John Swanton gathered these stories, Ghandl was about 50 years old. He was blind from one of the many epidemics that had ravaged the Northwest Coast, and living at Skidegate Mission. Ghandl dictated the texts--6 hours a day, 6 days a week, for about three weeks--to another Haida man, Henry Moody, who then helped Swanton to translate them to phonetics. Swanton eventually transcribed them into a running prose, but I can't imagine that his prose was anything like the poetic beauty of what appears in this book.

It is a difficult task to make the disparate elements of oral myths cohere and stand as written literature; often they read disjointedly and almost nonsensically. But here, they are aligned by an internal structure that gives them continuity, yet they are allowed enough breathing room so that the inexplicable can flourish.

Robert Bringhurst is a Canadian poet, professor and typographer who seems to have an unusually perceptive eye and ear. His respect and appreciation for these narratives is palpable. Ghandl's nuances, his sly elusions, his profound phrasing, his complex patterns of movement are all understood and protected. Best of all, Bringhurst, like Ghandl, doesn't distance himself from the Mythworld, and between the two of them the reader is plunged headfirst into the Numinous, without any "once upon a time" preambles or anthropological remove.

Ghandl's Mythworld is a visionary space, vibrant and contradictory, where the ordinary conventions that govern reality don't apply. Greater and grander laws are at work, and Ghandl conveys their mysterious operations with a matter-of-fact certainty. There is a sense that he is not outside the Mythworld and looking in; he is inside it as complicit witness. He's not describing anything remote or shadowy; he is present among the people and spirit beings and is awed, instructed and amused by their transformations and exploits.

Everything in the Mythworld is at once familiar and fantastic. In Ghandl's telling, the words he uses seem to be the only words possible, as they both activate and accompany the spirits beings. The words themselves are the manner by which these supernatural beings come alive. You would be hard-pressed to find, in modern literature, any writing so vital, expressing so much so sparingly.

This book demonstrates that great narratives, even if eroded by time and passed through many hands and processes, can endure with their powers intact. These nine tales are spellbinding.
  • Ann
In six months we visit the Haida Gwaii archipelago (Queen Charlotte Islands) for the first time. In preparation I'm reading all I can of its fierce and cultured native people; its troubled history; it's exquisitely powerful art; and its wild coasts. "Nine Visits to the Mythworld" permits a potent view into Haida myth-time, the time before humans as something separate from the world of transforming gods, creatures, and cosmic material. A world with porous levels: sky, sea, and land, and passable boundaries: horizon, cave-mouths, and tide-bands.

Through Bringhurst, Ghandl speaks in clear clauses that ring and cut like adze blows; spoken lines that call up images potent as any of Homer, Pound, or Williams:

* Smoke from village fires rising into the clouds like the teeth of a comb.
* Of mouse-woman: "She spoke with grace./ Her voice had big round eyes."
* Of an angry god: "Why are their spear points in your eyes?"
* Of an old woman flying: "Her wings were like dry branches./ She flew low./ She flew there crookedly./ She teetered through the air."
* Of a pivotal and very thin cord made from the "sinew of wrens."

These myths are chock-full of loyalty, revenge, and transformation; danger, death, and resurrection; sex, surrealism, violence, and fractal repetitions. This is the stuff of potent dreams.
  • Tamesya
Robert Bringhurst devoted separate volumes to two great poets, Skaay (I'll leave out the lineage name) and Ghandl. Of the two, Ghandl is the easier. His poems are short, focused, intense and memorable. They're often eerie like nightfall on the water. But they're far more than entertainment. Like all real myths, they point to things that can't be stated outright; they teach us ways of finding ourselves in the world and recognizing the intricate weave of reciprocal forces that underpins what we think of as reality. The whole trilogy is eye-opening. Start anywhere; you'll probably end up with all three. And you'll be glad you did.