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by Aidan Gillen,Roddy Doyle

Download Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha eBook
ISBN:
0453009530
Author:
Aidan Gillen,Roddy Doyle
Language:
English
Publisher:
Highbridge Audio; Abridged edition (January 1, 1995)
EPUB book:
1534 kb
FB2 book:
1463 kb
DJVU:
1789 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
132


This book is dedicated to. Rory. Liam and Aidan turned down their cul-de-sac. We said nothing; they said nothing. Liam and Aidan had a dead mother. Missis O’Connell was her name.

This book is dedicated to. We were coming down our road. It’d be brilliant, wouldn’t it?

Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle, first published in 1993 by Secker and Warburg. It won the Booker Prize that year.

Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle, first published in 1993 by Secker and Warburg. The story is about a 10-year-old boy living in Barrytown, North Dublin, and the events that happen within his age group, school and home in around 1968.

Home Roddy Doyle Paddy Clarke Ha Ha H. Roddy Doyle is an internationally bestselling writer.

Home Roddy Doyle Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. Home. Paddy clarke ha ha ha, . He is also the author of the novels Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (1993 Booker Prize winner), The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, A Star Called Henry, and Oh, Play That Thing; the short story collection The Deportees; and a nonfiction book about his parents, Rory & Ita.

In Roddy Doyle's Booker Prize-winning novel Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, an Irish lad named Paddy rampages through the streets of Barrytown with a pack of like-minded hooligans, playing cowboys and Indians, etching their names in wet concrete, and setting fires

In Roddy Doyle's Booker Prize-winning novel Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, an Irish lad named Paddy rampages through the streets of Barrytown with a pack of like-minded hooligans, playing cowboys and Indians, etching their names in wet concrete, and setting fires. Roddy Doyle has captured the sensations and speech patterns of preadolescents with consummate skill, and managed to do so without resorting to sentimentality.

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Paddy Clarke's name is written in wet cement all over Barrytown, north Dublin. 8 34 5 Author: Roddy Doyle Narrator: Aidan Gillen. Download books offline, listen to several books simultaneously, switch to kids mode, or try out a book that you never thought you would. Paddy Clarke is ten years old. Paddy Clarke lights fires. Paddy Clarke's name is written in wet cement all over Barrytown, north Dublin. Paddy Clarke's heroes are Father Damien (and the lepers), Geronimo and George Best. Paddy Clarke has a brother called Francis, but Paddy calls him Sinbad and hates him because that's the rule.

Liam and Aidan turned down their cul-de-sac. It’d be brilliant, wouldn’t it?

Hilarious and poignant, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha charts the triumphs, indignities, and bewilderment of a. .

Hilarious and poignant, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha charts the triumphs, indignities, and bewilderment of a young boy and his world, a place full of warmth, cruelty, confusion and love. About Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. Winner of the Booker Prize – Roddy Doyle’s witty, exuberant novel about a young boy trying to make sense of his changing world. Look for Roddy Doyle’s new novel, Smile, coming in October of 2017.

Related items to consider. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha by Roddy Doyle Paperback. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha by Roddy Doyle (Paperback, 1994). Paddy Clarke Ha, Ha, Ha by Roddy Doyle. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha by Roddy Doyle. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha by Roddy Doyle 9780749397357 Brand New. £. 9. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha by Roddy Doyle (Hardback, 1997)

Patrick Clarke is a ten-year-old boy trying to make sense of his world. He is confused. His Ma and Da fight too much. School seems like a joke. And love, though it has a good reputation, seems pretty cruel. Paddy sees everything, but has trouble understanding it all. His story is an exuberant romp through the triumphs, indignities, and troublemaking detours of an Irish childhood. Written with warmth and wit by the author of The Commitments, which was made into a hit movie, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha is the most moving story about the humor and challenge of growing up since Catcher in the Rye.
  • Mora
Brendan Behan once wrote, "It's nice to be Irish, but would you want your daughter to marry one?" Well, I married an Irishman, and I recognize so much of the culture in this book. The story is mainly about clever--oh SO clever-boys who grow up in a post-war Ireland that is depressed financially, repressed by the Church and family rules, fathers who take to beating their progeny and of course drinking. These little boys have little to play with, and using their imagination to follow their curiosity, invent games more dangerous than rugby, built structures for fights, complete with traps. They have fun, they bleed, they make up stories for their Ma's about their black eyes and ruined Sunday jackets. But the writing is excellent, I could feel every punch and feel every kiss. Much affection accompanies the ongoing "wars". So HA HA Paddy Clarke and thank you, Roddy Doyle for a brilliant and moving book.
  • Captain America
Voice driven and full of fun, tragedy and exhuberance! Must read.
  • Silver Globol
I found book tedious. Much of book was about the school boys and their misdeeds, their bullying and fighting. The last quarter of the book dealt with how he handled his family issues but book never revealed the cause of the issues. I would not recommend this book.
  • Beydar
I bought this book because it had a good price on Book Bub, decent reviews, and a Booker prize, I but couldn’t get interested enough in the characters and story. It was fine.
  • Windforge
After reading this book, I am almost inclined to go back and change my review of David Mitchell's Black Swan Green, which owes a tremendous debt to Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha.

Doyle's book is a marvel not because of a particularly ambitious plot but rather because he captures the fickle nature of pre-adolescence as experienced by the pre-adolescent. I don't say this to belittle the family drama the eponymous character lives through. However, the drama is especially compelling only because we get a truly believable stream of consciousness narrative that magnifies the banality of it all in much the same way it would be magnified in any child's mind.

Stream of consciousness narratives can be difficult to follow at times. Even though this one, like many others, is chronologically non-linear, it is not willfully opaque. It moves authentically through Paddy's days with his friends and schoolmates, juxtaposing his peer relationships with his family ones.

Doyle's book is a pleasure to read, and stylistically brilliant. There is every reason pick it up. And pair Black Swan Green with this one, not Catcher in the Rye.
  • Nafyn
This was my second Roddy Doyle novel and I loved it. The voice is incredibly, wonderfully strong and the story so small and yet so very, painfully, universally large ...
  • Fenritaur
I recognized myself every page. Brought back memories that were long gone (I’m 66). Non stop prodigious crafting totally fun
Great book, fast paced read...