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Download The Kobra Manifesto eBook

by Adam Hall

Download The Kobra Manifesto eBook
ISBN:
044014406X
Author:
Adam Hall
Publisher:
Dell Publishing; First Edition edition (May 1, 1978)
EPUB book:
1862 kb
FB2 book:
1481 kb
DJVU:
1498 kb
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
929


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This year they’d added another layer of Armco on the outside of the bends and joined the two bottom rows with massive steel flitch plates to stop people forcing the rails apart and this must have saved a lot of injuries when Hans Strobel came round three laps from the finish and hit one of the uprights and bounced off it and. spun twice and caught fire. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

When four top operatives die mysterious deaths, Quiller, the Bureau's top intelligence agent, follows the world's five deadliest men from the French Riviera, to Rome, to Cambodia, to New York, and to Brazil.

Читать онлайн The Kobra Manifesto. I'm in this trade to prove myself. I'm frightened of pushing things to the. point where they might blow up - so that's what I go on doing, to prove I'm not frightene.

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The Kobra Manifesto book. THE KOBRA MANIFESTO is the seventh of Adam Hall's highly acclaimed series of Quiller novels. This chilling novel has all the gloss, pace and tension of Ian Fleming, combined with a detailed knowledge of secret service procedures characteristic of John le Carre. Tense, intelligent, harsh and surprising.

Perhaps not,' he said, and turned away. There was an appointment book on the gilt console and he ran a long delicate finger down the page. You were to come for a lesson,' he said, 'on the Ninth. I went to look at the book. In a series of twelve lessons,' he said reluctantly, 'I shall need you here at least twice a week. He turned again and led me to the stairs and I followed him up.

I love Adam Hall and especially his Quiller books, though don't miss his books written as Elleston Trevor (like Flight of the Phoenix). The Kobra Manifesto is one of his Asian based thrillers, which are neat though I prefer the ones in Russia dealing with cold instead of humidity and heat. Old cases are sometimes referenced and you don't want to spoil the fun.

A Yugoslavian plane crashes in the south of France; a fuel tanker explodes at Rome airport, a British diplomat is shot dead in Phnom Penh. In each case Quiller, Adam Hall’s relentless British agent witnesses the violence as he pursues a fanatical terrorist group known as Kobra. THE KOBRA MANIFESTO is the seventh of Adam Hall’s highly acclaimed series of Quiller novels

In each case Quiller, Adam Hall's relentless British agent witnesses the violence as he pursues a fanatical terrorist group known as Kobra. THE KOBRA MANIFESTO is the seventh of Adam Hall's highly acclaimed series of Quiller novels

In each case Quiller, Adam Hall's relentless British agent witnesses the violence as he pursues a fanatical terrorist group known as Kobra.

  • Unsoo
I love Adam Hall and especially his Quiller books, though don't miss his books written as Elleston Trevor (like Flight of the Phoenix). The Kobra Manifesto is one of his Asian based thrillers, which are neat though I prefer the ones in Russia dealing with cold instead of humidity and heat. Hall is brilliant with giving you a sense of place even as he traps you inside the head of agent who knows that someday his job will kill him.

Be sure to begin the series with the first book and take them in order. Old cases are sometimes referenced and you don't want to spoil the fun.
  • Tall
Unfortunately, Elleston Trevor's (a.k.a. Adam Hall's) ill-conceived "Kobra Manifesto" begins by placing the ever-ragged Quiller in an uneven series of disjointed events that lead from one location to the next with little cohesion. This is quite an erratic and disappointing break from the masterful storytelling readers of the series have grown to expect. We go from a plane crash in the south of France, to a KGB break-in of Quiller's flat, to a car chase in Rome, to, most originally, an assignment that takes place during the US evacuation of Phnom Penh, Cambodia in April 1975. All this is abandoned before Trevor settles on what becomes an unbelievable kidnapping and hijacking plot.

It is often said of adventure series like this that the strength and credibility of each story can only be as good as its chosen antagonists. Unlike previous novels, the villains this time around are top terrorist figures from around the globe. Trevor seems as far off his game in his characterization of this group of "Kobra" terrorists as Quiller is in battling them. The rogue's gallery that eventually makes the rendezvous in Brazil has little in the way of an ideological bond - there is a vague mention of Arafat and the PLA, but only one of them is actually Palestinian. Likewise, the size and scope of Kobra seems to morph as the book progresses, sometimes being portrayed as a far-reaching global network that operates as a legitimate intelligence agency, but eventually settles on a clandestine group of six. Villains, characters, and the agents following them are eliminated or simply drop dead with little to no impact on the resulting plot.

Based on everything that even lay persons have come to understand about the nature of terrorists post-9-11, it becomes inconceivable that these mercenaries would ever have the will to put their own lives on the line for what becomes, a foolhardy, suicidal pact that stretches believability to paper-thin proportions. Moreover, it doesn't help that Trevor dismisses the intelligence of his villains and denies them any clever plot twists or saves. "The political terrorist is a man who could create new and better worlds if he could express his dreams with intelligence; having none, he can only express his frustration," Trevor writes. Though most would agree, the notion does little to add to the narrative. Satynovich Zade falls short of mastermind status and there is no one left for Quiller to adequately match wits against. Trevor struggles to make the scene realistic, but it is to little avail. It becomes too unlikely that an American Secretary of Defense would act this way (why call in the British in the first place?) and too much for even the looniest terrorist group to demand of him. What is left is simply a war of nerves punctuated by a series of gritty and violent events that ends abruptly and offers no levity or resolution to its numerous hanging threads.

It's a shame, because the narrative keeps providing interesting premises before abandoning them. For instance, the deadly scenario in Phnom Penh is uniquely exciting and the steamy romp with Shadia and its aftermath is a deliciously imagined subplot. The pieces though never fall together in any satisfactory shape. One keeps hoping for Kobra to work in a manner that pits US government interest against that of their British allies for an explanation of why all this was going on or for the Bureau to simply order Quiller to assassinate Kobra's hostage (leading to the kind of moral dilemma provided in the next book). Or, failing all that, for some explanation as to what Heinrich Fogel or Erich Stern had to do with anything. Ultimately, "The Kobra Manifesto" is simply Quiller penned on autopilot. In other words, it's a no go.
  • Blueshaper
Another great Quiller book. Q goes all out to bring the mission to conclusion. Just when you think he's blown it, he takes it to the next level. I'll continue reading all the Quiller books because he's the most interesting secret agent ever. Not to take anything away from Ian Fleming but Adam Hall's Quiller is fascinating and kind of makes 007 look a little lame.
  • Qag
Never met a Quiller novel I didn't love. Quilter is the ultimate wet work genius. Adam Hall brilliantly puts us into the deep darkness that is a cerebrum actively using the amygdala.
  • Vudogal
Well paced, intelligently devised, oodles more interesting than anything Ian Fleming ever wrote.
  • Aedem
Found it hard to take a break from reading it; could not wait for the next plot development and was usually caught by surprise in what happened!
  • Gunos
In good shape. Great plot
Adam Hall is my favorite writer. Quiller is my favorite spy. Read the whole series!