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Download Nick Demske (Modern Poet Series) eBook

by Nick Demske

Download Nick Demske (Modern Poet Series) eBook
ISBN:
1934200395
Author:
Nick Demske
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fence Books (October 1, 2010)
Pages:
88 pages
EPUB book:
1160 kb
FB2 book:
1219 kb
DJVU:
1396 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
107


Nick Demsky reads his poetry at Linneman's 2015.

Nick Demsky reads his poetry at Linneman's 2015.

Nick Demske reads 3 original poems at Myopic Books in Chicago, IL 2010; "Harlem Techtonica", "And the . He was awarded the 2010 Fence Modern Poets Series prize for a self-titled manuscript published November of 2010.

Nick Demske reads 3 original poems at Myopic Books in Chicago, IL 2010; "Harlem Techtonica", "And the Symbol of His Covenant Shall Decorate Our Shields", and "Blues Sonnet". Nick Demske lives in Racine, Wisconsin, and works at the Racine Public Library.

Nick Demske writes from culture like the Hollywood version of a rebellious slave, the role shredding off him, culture's synthetic exemplary tales shredding and piling up on the floor of the projector room.

Racine Public Library. Literacy Evangelist · 2007 to present · Racine, Wisconsin.

Prose by This Author.

Nick Demske’s self-titled manuscript won the 2010 Fence Modern Poets Series Prize and will be published in November.

Winner of the 2008 Fence Modern Poets Series Prize, selected by Nick Flynn. Again and again James Shea brings us to the edge of the unknown and points into the darkness, until our eyes adjust and we see that he is pointing at himself, already there. These poems make me wish I had the same dreams Shea has, and after reading this book it seems possible-anything does. Series: Fence Modern Poet Series.

Selected for the Fence Modern Poets Series by Joyelle McSweeney

Selected for the Fence Modern Poets Series by Joyelle McSweeney. Nick Demske writes from culture like the Hollywood version of a rebellious slave, the role shredding off him, culture's synthetic exemplary tales shredding and piling up on the floor of the projector room.

Nick Demske lives in Racine, Wisconsin, and works there at the Racine Public Library. His self-titled manuscript was selected by Joyelle McSweeney for the Fence Modern Poets Series prize and was published in the fall of 2010. It was featured as one of 15 debut poetry books from 2010 by Poets and Writers magazine and it was chosen as one of the ten best books of poetry for the year by a reader’s survey conducted by The Believer magazine.

"Nick Demske writes from culture like the Hollywood version of a rebellious slave, the role shredding off him, culture's synthetic exemplary tales shredding and piling up on the floor of the projector room."—Joyelle McSweeney

His name is "a transcendant uber-obsenity that can be understood universally by speakers of any language."

  • Vispel
First of all, let me say that I feel totally unqualified to review this book, so this is probably more of a comment on my own inadequacy as a reader than a comment on the quality of the writing. That said, I am very intrigued by this book, and I feel that, depending on how the reader approaches the work, one will come away from it being astounded, confused, offended, or oddly curious. I am not offended, though I understand why others may be. Nick Demske makes statements in his book which are outrageously offensive by themselves. Within the context of his poems, however, these statements become one element in a larger, absurd/comical jargon that he is creating by collaging and putting semantic twists on the clichés and jargons of others. So, when he makes a statement like "The holocaust never happened" in a collage poem (of sorts), I feel like what he's really telling us is, "Look how ridiculous this statement is. Some jerk said this and really meant it," rather than, "This is my actual worldview, reader. Take it or leave it." Still, it is a tough statement to digest in any context, and my sympathy is with those readers who are not able to give the writer the benefit of the doubt, as I am doing. I do wonder at times if Demske is overplaying the shock-value of his poetic hand, but I admire him for taking risks with both style and subject matter.

Overall, the book is deserving of a careful read and there are many fun and laugh-out-loud moments to be had, even if you aren't sure you're "getting it," but it is not for everyone. If you don't like experimental poetry, you might want to steer clear. If you enjoy having your expectations messed with and you don't mind being occasionally made to squirm (in the uncomfortable way), then this is the book for you.
  • Doulkree
Nick Demske's self-titled collection (Fence Books, 2010) was one of the first collections of poetry I remember reading and being blown away by how the poet used the genre to play with language in a visual way. The line breaks often suggest the line ends with one word, only for the ending of the word to be on the next line. Demske's use of this strategy made each poem something I had to read and read again, filling me with surprise. I remember being intrigued and wanting to read different parts to someone nearby.
  • fightnight
I was pulled through this collection at an urgent pace I rarely feel reading new collections of poetry. Even collections I've loved for years don't "hook" me like this. One of the more engaging books I've read in some time. Demske's voice is playfully--even mockingly--self aware and irreverent, "The Key to brainwashing is repetition. They key / Did you expect me to repeat that now?" (from "Psychie 101")

He has an incredible gift of deconstructing the rhetorical trappings of idiom and cliche', "We maim / Our temples, kneel on marbles, we drag / Nails through cheeks, we bum rush body bags, / Caskets . . . to know a veil. I pulverized the cross to kindling. / I whittled my face to skull." (from "Blues Sonnet")

It's so fresh and different, I'm at a loss of language to properly do it justice. I feel I love it. But I'm not sure exactly what I *think* about it--or how to articulate it. I best quote Demske's poem "Treausure" here: "I don't know what I think about / / That. I don't know what I think / About. I don't know what I think.

Highly recommended.
  • Molotok
As a poet and as a woman, I did not gain from this book.

I'm offended, and I want my eleven dollars back.
I don't want to buy you breakfast, Nick Demske, not even an Egg McMuffin.