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Download John Keats: The Making of a Poet eBook

by Aileen Ward

Download John Keats: The Making of a Poet eBook
ISBN:
0374520291
Author:
Aileen Ward
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux; Revised, Subsequent edition (December 1, 1986)
EPUB book:
1449 kb
FB2 book:
1427 kb
DJVU:
1526 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
575


Keats, John, 1795-1821. New York, Viking Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Keats, John, 1795-1821. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Gutierres on September 13, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

John Keats: The Making of a Poet is a biography about the poet written by Aileen Ward. Winner of the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize. National Book Award for Arts and Letters (Non-fiction)

John Keats: The Making of a Poet is a biography about the poet written by Aileen Ward. National Book Award for Arts and Letters (Non-fiction). for Aileen Ward, his latest biographer, both the poems and letters are merely reflections of the more important ""inner drama"" which was his life. Anthony deMello (John Keats Forum).

Start by marking John Keats: The Making of a Poet as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ward, called "the foremost living authority on Keats," won the National Book Award for Arts and Letters for her biography

Ward, called "the foremost living authority on Keats," won the National Book Award for Arts and Letters for her biography. It relates the art to the life in a time-honored fashion, though one that not all critics and biographers agree with. She follows a chronological structure, though not a rigorously strict one, but although she provides lots of months and days, she seldom gives the year in question.

Anthony deMello (John Keats Forum).

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Aileen Ward, a scholar whose sympathetic, insightful biography of the Romantic poet John Keats won a National Book Award in 1964, died on May 31 in her home in Santa Monica, Calif. She was 97. The death was confirmed by her nephew Alex Ward.

Traces the life of Keats, examines the development of his poetry, and describes the factors which influenced Keats as a poet.

Select Format: Hardcover. Traces the life of Keats, examines the development of his poetry, and describes the factors which influenced Keats as a poet. Format:Mass Market Paperback. ISBN13:9780374520298. Release Date:December 1986.

John Keats: The Making of a Poet by Ward, Aileen and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles . We take great pride in accurately describing the condition of our books and media, ship within 48 hours, and offer a 100% money back guarantee.

We take great pride in accurately describing the condition of our books and media, ship within 48 hours, and offer a 100% money back guarantee. Seller Inventory mon0000163654. More information about this seller Contact this seller 13. John Keats : The Making of a Poet. Published by Viking Press New York.

Tatum made his film debut in the drama film Coach Carter. His breakthrough role was in the 2006 dance film Step Up, which introduced him to a wider audience

Anthony deMello (John Keats Forum). php?title John Keats: The Making of a Poet&oldid 724798290". Categories: 1963 books. Tatum made his film debut in the drama film Coach Carter. His breakthrough role was in the 2006 dance film Step Up, which introduced him to a wider audience. He is known for his portrayal of the character Duke in.

Traces the life of Keats, examines the development of his poetry, and describes the factors which influenced Keats as a poet
  • Dakora
Aileen Ward's celebrated, good, but far from perfect _John Keats: The Making of a Poet_ in its revised edition is well worth reading. Ward, called "the foremost living authority on Keats," won the National Book Award for Arts and Letters for her biography. It relates the art to the life in a time-honored fashion, though one that not all critics and biographers agree with. She follows a chronological structure, though not a rigorously strict one, but although she provides lots of months and days, she seldom gives the year in question. This is frustrating, requiring much thumbing of her book and often, consultation of other sources to discover the full date. She frequently quotes from his poetry but does not always tell the poor reader which poem she is quoting.

Still, the book is readable and often full of insights, though many of her arguments are almost as elusive as the poetry, which I greatly admire. She relates that Keats's father died after being thrown from a horse when the future poet was 8 or 9. His mother almost immediately remarried but soon abandoned her 4 young children and her new husband. As Ward says, the effect on Keats was devastating. "He was to search for an idealized father in one older man after another throughout his life" and his loss of the "beautiful and recklessly affectionate" mother, whose favorite he was, made him forever distrustful of women, including Fanny Brawne, the love of his short life. He was raised by his grandmother, who of course died. His mother later returned, and he nursed her until she died of tuberculosis. He also nursed his younger brother Tom until he, too, succumbed to the disease. Thus, he was no stranger to tragedy, not only in life but in literature, notably in Shakespeare.

Ward does a good job of explaining the famous and problematical line from "Ode on a Grecian Urn": " `Beauty is truth, truth beauty'¯that is all/Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know." She speaks of the contradictions of experience that Keats notices as the poem develops: "The timeless perfection of art, he now sees, contains its own imperfection. . . . With this insight, the illusion of the urn's vital existence begins to collapse. . . . But at this moment, as he turns wearily back to the world of time, the urn breaks its silence with a message of consolation for him." Here, she quotes the famous stanzas about beauty being truth. "If," she says, "the real or `true' world is viewed as intensely and disinterestedly as the poet contemplates the imaginary world of the urn, it yields up its own beauty; if the beauty of art is searched to the very depths of speculation, truth will be found there. The true beauty is not merely beautiful beauty of 'an endless bliss,' but the difficult beauty of light and shade; so also the truth that this is 'a World of Pains and troubles' becomes beautiful when it is recognized as not merely necessary but desirable, as the truth that this world is also a 'vale of Soul-making.'" This is not vastly different from Lionel Trilling's interpretation, though it is a world away from Philip Larkin's take: "I have always believed that beauty is beauty, truth truth, that is not all ye know on earth and all ye need to know."

Ward had earlier written about "a recurrent theme of his later work: beauty as a rare and unearthly visitant, who appears and departs as suddenly as she came, leaving a chill premonition in the air behind her." Also, commenting on _The Fall of Hyperion_, Ward writes, "it is the face of death itself, in the most beautiful and terrifying aspect in which Keats had met it--the face of his dead mother, shrouded for her coffin. It is the ultimate image of Keats's poetry."

Ward provides a moving portrait of Keats, dying himself of tuberculosis in Italy at age 25 in 1821, away from Fanny Brawne and all his close friends but one. She concludes that "the Victorians had fastened on the more imitable and less valuable aspects of Keats's work, his sensuousness without his objectivity, his melancholy without his 'knowledge of light and shade.'" Our sense of Keats has changed; yet what now seems most significant in his art--the sureness of ear and firmness of structure, the dialectic of imagery, the tragic vision of life--remains a lesson which every poet must learn for himself." Yet in her last line she quotes the Victorian Matthew Arnold, "he is--he is with Shakespeare."
  • Thorgaginn
This is an excellent, fluidly written book which explores the life and writing of John Keats. Aileen Ward writes from a psychological perspective and seems to enter deeply into the inner workings of the poet. She describes his development with sensitivity and elegance. Her writing is seamless, and although she explores Keats's life thoroughly, the text never seems weighed down by detail. Ward's account may seem in certain sections to idealize Keats as 'the poet' and set him above the 'common man.' She can also seem subtly manipulative in her treatment of his life and the psychological journey that she believes him to have undertaken. At times, the reader wonders how she could write so authoritatively on Keats's inner life. However, despite these issues, Ward's biography is extremely valuable for anyone who wishes to better know Keats and his life. It is a perfect book for the beginning Keats scholar-- a deeply-felt biography which seems true to its subject in style as well as form.
  • Orevise
Ward shapes the life of Keats into a narrative as lively and tangible as the best novel. Her obvious sympathy for the poet, in the trials of poetic invention and during the long decline in health that preceded his premature death, is never overpowering, nor does it cloud a balanced presentation of the details of his life. By far the best literary biography I've read.