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Download Shining in the Ancient Sea: The Astronomical Ancestry of Homer's Odyssey eBook

by Laurin R. Johnson

Download Shining in the Ancient Sea: The Astronomical Ancestry of Homer's Odyssey eBook
ISBN:
0966982800
Author:
Laurin R. Johnson
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Multonomah House; 1st United States ed edition (May 1, 1999)
Pages:
156 pages
EPUB book:
1419 kb
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1453 kb
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1499 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
173


Astronomical references buried in the Odyssey correspond to a system of astronomy found in the Vedic literatur Shining in the Ancient Sea is written for the non-specialist, although it does assume that the reader is familiar with Homer's Odyssey

Astronomical references buried in the Odyssey correspond to a system of astronomy found in the Vedic literatur Shining in the Ancient Sea is written for the non-specialist, although it does assume that the reader is familiar with Homer's Odyssey. Astronomical references buried in the Odyssey correspond to a system of astronomy found in the Vedic literature of India.

The Astronomical Ancestry of Homer's Odyssey.

book by Laurin R. Johnson. Shining in the Ancient Sea : The Astronomical Ancestry of Homer's Odyssey. by Laurin R. 1st United States ed. Published 1999 by Multnomah House Press in Portland, Or. Written in English.

Astronomical references buried in the Odyssey correspond to a system of astronomy found in the Vedic literature of India.

Article in Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage · December 2004. Cite this publication. Dimitris Sinachopoulos. National Observatory of Athens. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

Homer's Odyssey: Books XIII-XXIV. Osborne, R. Greece in the Making: 1200-479 BC. London, 1996. The Oxford Classical Dictionary. Vol. 1: Theogony, Works and Days, Testimonia. 2: The Shield, Catalogue of Women, Other Fragments. 4th ed. rev. Ed. S. Hornblower, A. Spawforth, and E. Eidinow.

com Product Description (ISBN 0966982800, Paperback). Shining in the Ancient Sea is written for the non-specialist, although it does assume that the reader is familiar with Homer's Odyssey

com Product Description (ISBN 0966982800, Paperback). Shining in the Ancient Sea is written for the non-specialist, although it does assume that the reader is familiar with Homer's Odyssey.

For Homer says also: "Now after the ship had left the river-stream of Oceanus" .

For Homer says also: "Now after the ship had left the river-stream of Oceanus"; and "In the island of Ogygia, where is the navel of the sea," going on to say that the daughter of Atlas lives there; and again, regarding the Phaeacians, "Far apart we live in the wash of the waves, the farthermost of men, and no other mortals ar. -Akhilleus (talk) 04:42, 23 October 2006 (UTC). Let's try "unusual" then, unless anyone can think of a mot plus juste. Thanks for the reference to Johnson.

Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences, dating back to antiquity, with its origins in the religious, mythological .

Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences, dating back to antiquity, with its origins in the religious, mythological, cosmological, calendrical, and astrological beliefs and practices of prehistory: vestiges of these are still found in astrology, a discipline long interwoven with public and governmental astronomy. It was not completely separated in Europe (see astrology and astronomy) during the Copernican Revolution starting in 1543.

The Odyssey (Book 1). Homer. Featuring Samuel Butler. 351 where the mountain is called Neritum, the same place being intended both here and in book xiii. It is an island covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and a goddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks after the bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keep heaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold of poor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishment to make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinks of nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.

Shining in the Ancient Sea is written for the non-specialist, although it does assume that the reader is familiar with Homer's Odyssey. The book contends that the voyage of Odysseus took place in the night sky, not in the Mediterranean Sea as is commonly believed. Astronomical references buried in the Odyssey correspond to a system of astronomy found in the Vedic literature of India. Given this correspondence, it becomes evident that the poem must have had its beginnings long before the Greek speakers migrated into Greece, and probably originated as a means to preserve and transmit a body of knowledge about the constellations and the movements of the sun and moon and planets. Generations of bards added to the poem in many ways, yet the astronomical information never disappeared, and actually determined the structure of the voyage of Odysseus.
  • Rare
For over 2500 years scholars have been trying to reconstruct Odysseus' sea voyage. described in Homer's Odyssey, through the Mediterranean. Only one conclusion is clear: the journey couldn't possibly have occurred there. None of the pieces fit! Recent thought provoking alternative theories have tried tracing Odysseus' adventures to the Baltic, or to the northwest coast of Africa, among other locations. Some writers have even placed the voyage in the night sky. Of all these books (and I've read quite a few), Laurin Johnson's is by far (by parsecs!) the most coherent. I think he may finally have solved the mystery.

"Shining in the Ancient Sea" came out in 1999. Since then, many of us have studied the nakshatras, the ancient Indo-European asterisms marking the ecliptic, so Johnson's proposal that Homer was describing a journey through these asterisms no longer seems as radical today as it did when the book was originally published. Now it just seems obvious. I have to say, in all seriousness, that anyone who's not familiar with Laurin Johnson's reading of the Odyssey, doesn't know the Odyssey at all!
  • Thetath
In this curious little book, Laurin Johnson takes us on a voyage through the stars parallel with that taken by Odysseus in Homer's "Odyssey." "It is possible to match them, adventure for asterism," he claims. The stations along the course of his wandering, as narrated by the hero to his hosts on the island of Scherie, are found to correspond with the stations in the course of the sun as it moves between the constellations from the Pleiades to Virgo. Aeolia, Laestrygonia, Circe, the land of the Cimmerians, the Sirens, Scylla, the clashing rocks, Thrinacie, Charybdis 1, Charybdis 2, and Scherie and its olive tree haven. These stations clearly do not correspond to the six zodiacal constellations that lie between those points, but rather to 11 of the 14 lunar stations (Nakshatras, twenty-eight in the full year) used in early Hindu time-reckoning. The association seems prima facie improbable, and Johnson can give no persuasive connection between the two systems of belief except to invoke their common origins at 3500 BCE, or so, in the Indo-European parent culture. The problem is that no trace of lunar stations persists in historical Hellenic culture. Johnson would say that the connections between the Nakshatras and features he detects in the "Odyssey" are those very missing traces. The "Odyssey", after all, is an oral poem whose elements, while glued together into a story by "Homer" in 850BCE or so, may go back as elements, some not long before the composition, some for centuries and even millennia.
The methodology seems circular: 1) I am convinced the Odyssey is a poem about the seasons (several books have so claimed); 2) elements of that poem may go back to Indo-European antecedents (several books have claimed this); 3) Hindu myth is often clearly to be associated with the celestial mechanics of precession (Bal Gangadhar Tilak); 4) strong parallelisms can be found between Indo-Iranian myth and certain mythologies of western Indo-European descent (but not the Greek) (F. Scott Littleton); by extrapolation of 3 by way of 4 and 2 to Greek culture (ignoring the fact that Indo-European comparative mythology has not been successful with Greek material), I will find evidence of Nakshatras in the "Odyssey". The result is a book full of wide-ranging speculation anchored here and there by surprisingly convincing observations: e.g., the four fig trees that mark the quarters of the journey and the quarters of the year; the discussion of Scylla. Best of all are the numerical associations (which, however, do not support the Hindu-Greek connection): 350 cattle of the sun is a rounded form of the 354 days in the lunar calendar; 360 Eumaean hogs is the standardized number of the days in the solar calendar; 108 goats slaughtered at the journey's beginning and 108 suitors slaughtered at its end = 1% of the number of days in synodic period of Saturn, a planet whose orbit of some 29.5 years would make it reside in a given Nakshatra for about one year; similarly the number 12 recurs in the poem, a number that is not the number of lunar months in a year but the length of Jupiter's period in years and also the number of zodiacal constellations so that Jupiter resides in a constellation for about one year, and the length of Odysseus's journey, 20 years, which is the period between the recurring conjunctions of Saturn and Jupiter. There are, no doubt, more such associations to be found, those for Mercury, Venus, and Mars.
A reader's reception of this book will depend entirely upon his disposition to skepticism. Someone who rejects anything not based on concretely interconnected evidence will have a hard time with it. This writer, having written a book (Stars, Gods, and Order in the Universe: the Myth of Replacement), whose ideas are also based on the writings of Tilak and Hamlet's Mill, am not entirely convinced in detail, but I certainly agree with Johnson that the "Odyssey" is a poem about the seasons and the stars and planets that govern them, and give him credit for having written a book charged with stimulating ideas and many wonderful observations.
The book is crippled by not having a subject index. There are too few illustrations to back up statements about star positions, despite the generally good introductions to matters celestial, and in particular, I would dispute the dates suggested for the reign of this or that constellation over the equinoxes and solstices.
  • Phain
An awesome writer. Reads like a cool breeze and a quality Bourbon
  • Tujar
I'm really impressed with this. I feel he makes a great case. It can never be perfect in every detail because the tale was probably passed on by people who did not know the relationship to the heavens.

For example, there was a recent Gilgamesh translation where it went for the story aspect and purposely left out 'repetitive lists of numbers.' That's fine--we learn something but it unhinges such writings from a great part of their intended purpose.

But back to why this is an exceptional work. There are fold-out star charts and attempts to relate to other traditions. Many cultures had the idea that your soul literally traveled along the Milky Way, encountering trials or gate-keepers where the educated person could bypass if they knew the right words or how to beat the trial or whatever. Many cultures used story as a mnemonic aid to help remember the stars in the seasons for navigation and general time-keeping.

Important stuff. Important to know how our ancestors thought and often to even see how religious stories got started.