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Download Faust: Part 2 (Penguin Classics) (Pt. 2) eBook

by David Constantine,A. S. Byatt,Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Download Faust: Part 2 (Penguin Classics) (Pt. 2) eBook
ISBN:
0140449027
Author:
David Constantine,A. S. Byatt,Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Penguin Classics; 1 edition (June 30, 2009)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1333 kb
FB2 book:
1912 kb
DJVU:
1941 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
312


ISBN-13: 978-0140449020.

by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (Author), David Luke (Translator) . In contrast to the clear-cut plot of Part One, Faust Part Two is a confusion of strange allegories and cryptic scenes that can often prove tedious to read, and therefore it is no surprise Goethe's admirers found it difficult to comprehend and appreciate. In fact, not many readers continue on past Part One, and few universities include Part Two for their courses in German drama and literature, which is a pity.

You can read Faust: Part 1 (Penguin Classics) (Pt. 1) online by David . 1). Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, David Constantine, A. S. Byatt. 1) online by David Constantine, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe or downloading.

Faust, Part Two (Paperback). Faust, Part 2 (Paperback). Published April 30th 2009 by Penguin Classics. Published July 22nd 1999 by Oxford University Press, USA. Paperback, 304 pages. Author(s): Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, David Luke (Translator). Paperback, 285 pages. ISBN: 0140449027 (ISBN13: 9780140449020).

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in Frankfurt-on-Main in 1749. David Constantine, A. 0140449027, 9780140449020. He studied at Leipzig, where he showed interest in the occult, and at Strassburg, where Herder introduced him to Shakespeare's works and to folk poetry. He produced some essays and lyrical verse, and at twenty-two wrote Götz von Berlichingen, a play which brought him national fame and established him in the current Sturm und Drang movement. A. Byatt, novelist, short-story writer, and critic, is the author of many books, including Possession, winner of the Man Booker Prize.

Faust is considered by many to be Goethe's magnum opus and the greatest work of German literature.

Johann Wolfgang von GOETHE. With a new introduction by David E. Wellbery. Book Description: One of the great classics of European literature, Faust is Goethe's most complex and profound work. To tell the dramatic and tragic story of one man's pact with the Devil in exchange for knowledge and power, Goethe drew from an immense variety of cultural and historical material, and a wealth of poetic and theatrical traditions. eISBN: 978-1-4008-5167-6.

by. Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, 1749-1832. New York : Arden Book C. [19

Johann Wolfgang Goethe was born in 1749.

Johann Wolfgang Goethe was born in 1749. He produced some essays and lyrical verse, and at twenty-four came to fame as part of the Sturm und Drang movement - a position established on the publication of Werther. Goethe worked on Faust throughout his life, while travelling through Italy and returning to Weimar, where he directed the State Theatre. Philip Wayne was Headmaster of St Marylebone Grammar School

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines

Byatt’s preface considers Goethe’s lifelong relationship with the myth of Faust and its influence on modern literature. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

In this sequel to Faust, Mephistopheles takes Faust on a journey through ancient Greek mythology, conjuring for him the insurpassably beautiful Helen of Troy, as well as the classical gods. Faust falls in love with and marries Helen, embodying for Goethe his 'imaginative longing to join poetically the Romantic Medievalism of the germanic West to the classical genius of the Greeks'. Further to the themes of redemption and salvation in this great drama, are Goethe's eerie premonitions of modern phenomena such as inflation and the creation of life by scientific synthesis.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Barinirm
I have always hated Faust II. It seems like I've put it down more times than I've picked it up. The writing style is overtly florid and there are moments in the text where I honestly could just not figure what was going on. Obscure references to Classical and Teutonic Mythology always went over my head - and I honestly hate using guides. It made reading the play feel more like a slog or a chore than anything. Apparently I'm not alone - it's one of the most ignored and infrequently taught works of Weimar Classicism.

I still think the work is overrated and at times, pretentious, but parts of it are stunningly beautiful. The able translation and scholarship of the introduction and copious notes make the play more accessible. Luke has really done a commendable job on a difficult text. I think footnotes would've been preferable to endnotes as I hate incessantly flipping back and forth. Also, the corresponding German text on the opposing page (like what Signet did with Faust I) would've been nice. It's good to get a feeling for Goethe's actual language - it really is quite beautiful. Something still gets lost in translation even though Luke is much more poetic than many other translators. Also, the mythology guide in the back is a great idea.

It's certainly still not a book for the Oprah's book club crowd as it's still a difficult book, but lit buffs who've been turned off to Faust II should give this edition another shot. Even though it's not perfect (no facing text or footnotes), this is the best translation/edition of Faust II I've ever seen. Luke should be commended.

Highly Recommended for the literature buff. Recommended for the scholar, perhaps in conjunction with an edition with facing text.
  • Natety
The translation is extremely well done. The introduction is very insightful without spoiling the content of the book. I was very much moved by the translator's descriptions of Goethe's inner world and, by placing it in a historical context, it was not a bit boring, but very interesting. I love the style of translation, which was very creative, poetic, lyrical, and fluent. I read Part Two of Faust when I was in high school, but it is so refreshing to read it again at 65 with this new translation. Thank you very much.
  • Llathidan
I enjoyed this classic with a clear understanding of the evil temptations in the world versus the beauty of remorseful penance gaining the glory of heaven! I was also fascinated with the perfection of poetry!
  • Gann
David Luke's translation and very valuable commentary gives real insight into the evolution of Part 2, and its relationship to Part 1, which was published much earlier. While giving due weight to Goethe's genius, Luke has open eyes, and never falls into the trap of being obsequious. I felt that I came away from reading Luke's translation with much greater insight into both the greatness and the baffling aspects of this incredible work.
  • inform
Faust part 2 was a good book. I had to read part 1 for my lit class and we were supposed to read sections from part 2. I decided to read the whole thing and made the right choice. It really brought the story of Faust together at the end.
  • Priotian
It is Goethe's philosophy of life that I was attracted. Because I thought that it penetrates into the story deeply. I am very interested in knowing whether Goethe believed the soul and a spiritual world. Faust is love with the beautiful woman of Helena in the ancient Greece. Thus Foust let Mephistopheles show in ancient Greece. In other words it is a spiritual world. Otherwise it is the world of the fantasy. Faust meets the animal that the face is a person, and the body is a horse. His name is called Chiron. It is said that he has given Helena a ride on his horseback. So Faust has a ride in his horseback.
The scene which comes across Chiron. 【On the earth I hear a drumming As of hurried hoof-beats coming. Far off I see Good luck approaching me. Can this already be My wondorous destny? It is a horseman; I can tell That he is bold and wise as well The steed he rides is gleaming white... I recognize him - I am right- Philyra's great and famous son! Stop, Chiron, stop! I have to speak to you....    】
Last words of the Faust story is very splendid. All that must disappear is but a parable. This way of thinking resemles Oriental Buddhology.
  • Mezilabar
Fantastic! Part One was incredible, and Part Two is not disappointing me so far!
Makes you love the devil!