almediah.fr
» » Hazmat

Download Hazmat eBook

by J.D. McClatchy

Download Hazmat eBook
ISBN:
0375414673
Author:
J.D. McClatchy
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Knopf; 1st edition (October 22, 2002)
Pages:
96 pages
EPUB book:
1765 kb
FB2 book:
1137 kb
DJVU:
1326 kb
Other formats
lrf lit lrf azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
795


HAZMAT, meaning "hazardous material," is an abbreviation familiar from signs at the entrances to long dark tunnels or on the sides of suspicious containers. Here, in a series of stunning poems, J. D. McClatchy examines the first hazmat we all encounter: our own bodies.

HAZMAT, meaning "hazardous material," is an abbreviation familiar from signs at the entrances to long dark tunnels or on the sides of suspicious containers.

D. "Sandy" McClatchy (August 12, 1945 – April 10, 2018) was an American poet, opera librettist and literary critic. McClatchy was born Joseph Donald McClatchy J. in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his P. He lived in Stonington, Connecticut, and New York. His husband was graphic designer Chip Kidd.

Here, in a series of stunning poems, J.

HAZMAT, meaning hazardous material, is an abbreviation familiar from signs.

HAZMAT, meaning hazardous material, is an abbreviation familiar from signs at the entrances to long dark tunnels or on the sides of suspicious containers. HAZMAT, meaning "hazardous material," is an abbreviation familiar from signs at the entrances to long dark tunnels or on the sides of suspicious containers.

With his first several books, J. McClatchy established himself as a poet of urbanity . McClatchy established himself as a poet of urbanity, intellect and prismatic emotion, in the tradition of James Merrill, W. H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop-one who balances an exploration of the underworld of desire with a mastery of poetic form, and whose artistry reveals the riches and ruins of our "plundered hearts.

by. McClatchy, J. 1945-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Finalist: Hazmat, by . McClatchy (Alfred . nopf). Olio, by Tyehimba Jess (Wave Books). For a distinctive work that melds performance art with the deeper art of poetry to explore collective memory and challenge contemporary notions of race and identity.

His book "Hazmat" (Alfred A. Knopf, 2002) was nominated for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize.

About McClatchy's work, the poet Anthony Hecht said, "There are very few poets writing today who, poem by poem, move me from admiration to admiration, and always . His message is his being there.

About McClatchy's work, the poet Anthony Hecht said, "There are very few poets writing today who, poem by poem, move me from admiration to admiration, and always with renewed and novel delight. There is no poet writing whose intelligence, dexterity, wit or depth of thoughtfulness or feeling is greater or more telling than J. McClatchy's.

In addition to writing poetry, . McClatchy received numerous commendations for his work, including the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1991 for his collection The Rest of the Way.

HAZMAT, meaning “hazardous material,” is an abbreviation familiar from signs at the entrances to long dark tunnels or on the sides of suspicious containers. Here, in a series of stunning poems, J. D. McClatchy examines the first hazmat we all encounter: our own bodies. The virtuosic “Tattoos” meditates on why we decorate the body’s surface, while other poems plunge daringly inward, capturing the way in which everything that makes us human–desire and decay, need and curiosity, the jarring sense of loss and mortality–hovers in the flesh. In the midst of it all is the heart, its treacheries, its gnawing grievances, its boundless capacities. With their stark titles (“Cancer,” “Feces,” “Jihad”), McClatchy’s poems work dazzling variations on this book’s theme: how we live with the fact that we will die. Crowned by the twenty-part sequence “Motets,” which deals out an exquisite hand of emotional crises, this collection brings us a sumptuous weave of impassioned thought and clear-sighted feeling. Holding up a powerful poetic mirror, McClatchy shows us our very selves in a chilling series of images: the melodrama of the body being played out, as it must be, in the theater of the spirit.
  • bass
I read a lot and a lot of different genres. There are times I walk into a bookstore or log onto Amazon.com and tell myself: "Pretend you are someone else. Get something outside you're normal realm of taste." Suddenly, I'm buying jazz or British chamber opera, a novel by Someset Maugham, a Britney Spears compilation, a Luchino Visconti film about the Nazis etc.

I've read or skimmed quite a few novels and books of poetry old and new. J. D. McClatchy, a middle-aged gay New Yorker of Celtic decent, is quite simply writing the best contemporary poetry out there. He's published heavily in the elite "Poetry" magazine and turned out several books of poetry and criticism. He's to poems what Michael Cunningham is to novels: simply the most gifted stylist I've encountered.

His style in "Hazmat" has been compared to Baudelaire because his earthy, gritty, sensual, tribal, blue collar themes are presented in precise classical verse. San Francisco poet Tom Gunn and British poet Anthony Hecht and, for that matter, photographer Robert Mapplethorpe all presented decadent subject matter with with a sterling classical sheen. It's an interesting contrast.

McClatchy writes about relevant subject matter like terrorism, like the men's movement, like aging in our youth culture, etc. He escapes the need to wallow in abstraction and mythology and his poems seem, as poems seldom do, torn from the headlines.
  • Vivados
Hazmat was a wonderful collection of all sorts of poems. There were Tankas, and Haikus, and even some I didn't know such as Canzone, and Epigram. I thought that these forms were really intricate, and hard to do. I did enjoy the word use though. I thought that it was really cool the way he used words, and painted pictures. An example that sticks in my mind is; She blacks her hair, and powders her face, getting ready to fight the evil. I would recommend this awesome collection to anyone who enjoys grammar and is interested in different forms of poetry. All in all this was a wonderful book comprised of amazing work!
  • Ironfire
I thought it would appreciate his poems, but no. Not for me.