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Download Robinson Jeffers: myth, ritual, and symbol in his narrative poems eBook

by Robert J Brophy

Download Robinson Jeffers: myth, ritual, and symbol in his narrative poems eBook
ISBN:
0829502513
Author:
Robert J Brophy
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Press of Case Western Reserve University; First edition (1973)
EPUB book:
1828 kb
FB2 book:
1710 kb
DJVU:
1306 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
725


Brophy, Robert J. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Brophy, Robert J. Jeffers, Robinson, 1887-1962 - Criticism and interpretation, Narrative poetry, American - History and criticism, Symbolism in literature, Ritual in literature, Myth in literature. Cleveland, Press of Case Western Reserve University. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 22, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Brophy, Robert . Robinson Jeffers: Myth, Ritual and Symbol in His Narrative Poems, Press of Case Western Reserve, 1973. Carpenter, Frederic . Robinson Jeffers, Twayne, 1962. The Twenties, Everett/Edwards, 1966. Coffin, Arthur . Robinson Jeffers: Poet of Inhumanism, University of Wisconsin Press, 1971. Concise Dictionary of Literary Biography: The Twenties, 1917-1929, Gale, 1989. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Gale, Volume 2, 1974, Volume 3, 1975, Volume 11, 1979, Volume 15, 1981, Volume 54, 1989. Dickey, James, Babel to Byzantium, Farrar, Straus, 1968.

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Agamemnon, Choephoroi (The Libation Bearers). How to cite this source. es/8503 <21 August 2019.

Robinson Jeffers: Myth, ritual, and symbol in his narrative poems. Cleveland, OH: The Press of Case Western Reserve University. no date, a). tThe distancer and the pursuer. Pendagast (E.,Compendium II: The best of the Family 1978–1983 (pp. 45–50). New Rochelle, NY: The Center for Family Learning. 40–44).

Robinson Jeffers Poems

Robinson Jeffers Poems Hurt Hawks I The broken pillar of the wing jags from the. John Robinson Jeffers was an American poet, known for his work about the central California coast. Most of Jeffers' poetry was written in classic narrative and epic form, but today he is also known for his short verse, and considered an icon of the environmental movement. Jeffers was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania (now part of Pittsburgh), the son of a Presbyterian minister and biblical scholar, Reverend Dr. William Hamilton Jeffers, and Annie Robinson Tuttle. Cleveland, OH: Case Western Reserve University Press, 1973; reprinted Hamden, CT: The Shoe String Press, 1976.

John Robinson Jeffers (January 10, 1887 – January 20, 1962) was an American poet, known for his work about the central California coast. Much of Jeffers' poetry was written in narrative and epic form

John Robinson Jeffers (January 10, 1887 – January 20, 1962) was an American poet, known for his work about the central California coast. Much of Jeffers' poetry was written in narrative and epic form. However, he is also known for his shorter verse and is considered an icon of the environmental movement.

Robinson Jeffers, Myth, Ritual, and Symbol in His Narrative Poems. Cleveland: Case Western Reserve University Press. produce less similar poetry than did Wallace Stevens and Robinson Jeffers

Book by Brophy, Robert J
  • Cells
Any study of Jeffers that ignores this book is ignorant. Brophy's analysis of "Tamar" is the foundation for anything else to be written about that poem. His close reading of "Roan Stallion" is brilliant and -- I can hardly imagine using this word to describe a scholarly book -- exciting. This is not to say I agree with him in detail, but when I finished these two analyses, it seemed there simply was nothing left to say about the poems. However...

Brophy's book suffers from the common failing of published dissertations. It can be plodding and formulaic as it jumps through the humiliating hoops of academe. His discussions drift sometimes from themes to formulas to recipes. In some cases, his analysis fails utterly, as in his gingerly reading of "Dear Judas" and the attempt to cram "Cawdor" into his chosen framework, which leads him to some tiny but telling factual errors. No, Artemis is not attended by "fauns," and Aphrodite is not generally associated with lions (although Jeffers himself links her to leopards in "The Cretan Women"). At no point in "Cawdor" can Fera Martial be described as a "ritual priestess." That barely works with California in "Roam Stallion," but it's just going to dang far. And for all his shushing of Wild BIll Everson on the subject of Freud, Brophy puts Jeffers on the couch far to frequently.

Nevertheless, his is the one book that provides a coherent, convincing framework to measure Jeffers' narratives against. Jeffers was a poet of myth. Not archetype, not politics, not Freudian dappling. Brophy broke new ground with this book, finding the key -- to the degree that there is ever a key to a writer's work -- to Jeffers' poetry. Read Myth, Ritual to grasp the excitement and compulsion of Jeffers' narratives, then read Radcliffe Squires, James Karman, and Frederick I. Carpenter for the whole picture.
  • Мох
What a tedious read! The premise of Brophy's book is to illuminate Jeffers's use of myth, ritual and symbolism in his works and he does do that at times. But for the major portion of the book he gives a sort of play-by-play of the featured narrative's "highlights" interspersed with the incidents which comprise the book's main thrust: myth, ritual and symbolism. But many of these examples are obvious and so overworked in explications on Jeffers that it becomes a labor to dredge through one more time. Frequently he cites examples of Freudian symbolism which are borderline at best and not in context with the work. Then other times he states such things as, and I paraphrase, "Roan Stallion isn't about sex with a horse" or "Jeffers didn't set out to shock readers." Of course it was and of course he did! I understand that his uses of ultra-violence, turgid sexual depravity and nihilism were all metaphors for human solipsism, but they were also powerful tools to elevate the dramas and pull in the reader. Which is something this book failed to do throughout as I found myself almost continuously cringing or yawning in terse rhythms. This book is for the scholar who has no inclinations towards writing creatively, but rather repeating a dead man's words in his own voice. Luckily for me I borrowed it from the library and saved myself a goodly sum of money.