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Download John Donne's "Desire of More": The Subject of Anne More Donne in His Poetry eBook

by M. Thomas Hester

Download John Donne's "Desire of More": The Subject of Anne More Donne in His Poetry eBook
ISBN:
0874135966
Author:
M. Thomas Hester
Category:
Poetry
Language:
English
Publisher:
Univ of Delaware Pr (January 1, 1997)
Pages:
265 pages
EPUB book:
1212 kb
FB2 book:
1775 kb
DJVU:
1837 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
282


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Are you sure you want to remove John Donne's "Desire of More" from your list? . The Subject of Anne More Donne in His Poetry. Published January 1997 by University of Delaware Press.

Are you sure you want to remove John Donne's "Desire of More" from your list? John Donne's "Desire of More". Love in literature, Femininity in literature, Criticism and interpretation, Poetry, Authors' spouses in literature, Women, Characters, Marriage, Women and literature, Psychological aspects, Desire in literature, In literature, History

More About this Poem. More Poems by John Donne. The English writer and Anglican cleric John Donne is considered now to be the preeminent metaphysical poet of his time.

More About this Poem. He was born in 1572 to Roman Catholic parents, when practicing that religion was illegal in England Read Full Biography. More About this Poet.

John Donne's desire of more : The Subject of Anne More Donne in his Poetry. Camille Wells Slights. The Lives of Dr. John Donne; Sir Henry Wotton; Mr. Richard Hooker; Mr George Herbert; and Dr. Robert Sanderson. John Donne and the Conway Papers: Patronage and Manuscript Circulation in the Early Seventeenth Century. John Donne: The Reformed Soul. The Eagle and the Dove: Reassessing John Donne.

Download book John Donne's. Library of Congress Control Number: 96015941. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0874135966 (alk. paper). System Control Number: (OCoLC)34658663. System Control Number

Maurine Sabine, ‘No Marriage in Heaven: John Donne, Anne Donne, and the Kingdome Come’, in John Donne’s ‘desire of more’: The Subject of Anne More Donne in His Poetry, ed. M. Thomas Hester (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1996), 23. oogle Scholar

Maurine Sabine, ‘No Marriage in Heaven: John Donne, Anne Donne, and the Kingdome Come’, in John Donne’s ‘desire of more’: The Subject of Anne More Donne in His Poetry, ed. oogle Scholar. 73. Arthur R Marotti, John Donne: Coterie Poet (Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1986), 15. 76. Patricia Garland Pinka, The Dialogue of One: The Songs and Sonnets of John Donne (Huntsville: University of Alabama Press, 1982), 13.

Donne wrote most of his love lyrics, erotic verse, and some sacred poems . In his later years, Donne's writing reflected his fear of his inevitable death. Facsimile, with introduction by M. Thomas Hester.

Donne wrote most of his love lyrics, erotic verse, and some sacred poems in the 1590's, creating two major volumes of work: Satires, and Songs and Sonnets. He wrote his private prayers, Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, during a period of severe illness and published them in 1624.

John Donne’s poetry is a curious mix of contradictions. Donne’s sonnet also ends with a very daring declaration of desire that God ‘ravish’ him – much as he had longed for the women in his life to ravish him in his altogether more libertine youth. Song: ‘Go and catch a falling star‘. At once spiritual and metaphysical, it is also deeply embedded in the physicality of bodies: love as a physical, corporeal experience as well as a spiritual high. His style can often be startlingly plain (‘For God’s sake hold your tongue’, one of the poems on this list begins), yet his imagery is frequently complex, his use of extended metaphors requiring some careful unpacking.

Common subjects of Donne's poems are love (especially in his early life), death (especially after his wife's death), and religion. John Donne's poetry represented a shift from classical forms to more personal poetry. John Donne's poetry represented a shift from classical forms to more personal poetry Some scholars believe that Donne's literary works reflect the changing trends of his l. .

It is one of Donne’s most popular love poems. Metaphysical poetry also sought to shock and challenge the reader; to question the unquestionable. The poem addresses Anne as ‘thou’, but we are not told of her response. It is a dramatic monologue in which the reader is like an eavesdropper, learning as the poem progresses about the poet’s deepest loving feelings. Donne uses humour to lighten what might otherwise be too earnest a mood, given the poet’s happiness. For example, the adjective ‘country’ is a pun, alluding to female genitals. The poetry often mixed ordinary speech with intellectual paradoxes and puns.

This volume is composed of thirteen essays by an international group of acclaimed Renaissance scholars on the presence of Anne More Donne in the poetry of her husband. In his epitaph for his wife upon her death in 1617, John Donne called her "Faeminae lectissimae, dilectissimaeque" - a woman "most choice" and "most beloved and loving": but these Latin terms of endearment also figured her as a woman both "well-read" and "very well-read." This book aims to endorse and to explore that view of her that is espoused by the poet in his epitaph through readings of his "readings" of her presence and absence as central subjects of Donne's own presentations of himself, his world, and his God.