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Download Field Study: Stories eBook

by Rachel Seiffert

Download Field Study: Stories eBook
ISBN:
0375422595
Author:
Rachel Seiffert
Category:
Short Stories & Anthologies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pantheon; First Edition edition (July 20, 2004)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1548 kb
FB2 book:
1810 kb
DJVU:
1139 kb
Other formats
mbr docx mobi txt
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
885


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Rachel Seiffert, author of The Dark Room, powerfully evokes our need for human connection in this dazzling and haunting group of stories.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Set against immense political upheaval.

Rachel Seiffert's much-fêted debut novel, The Dark Room, examined how history gives birth to itself. In Seiffert's first collection of stories, Field Study, the children of history are out in force. Its three ostensibly unconnected sections begat each other: the first saw the rise of Nazism through the story of a peculiarly benumbed child; the second, the tale of a bunch of bedraggled children crossing the landscape of fallen Germany, was a fine realisation of the fractures of war; the third, the story of a man delving into his family's past, was a. sober rereading of personal and political truths.

Field Study (Storycuts) – Ebook written by Rachel Seiffert. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Field Study (Storycuts). Martin is a graduate student spending a week undertaking scientific field study in a neighbouring, post-Communist country. He sees a residual bitterness among the town's people about the empty promises of an abandoned ideology. Will he allow this bitterness to flavour his own work? Part of the Storycuts series, this short story was previously published in the collection Field Study.

Rachel Seiffert, author of The Dark Room, powerfully evokes our need for human connection in this dazzling and haunting group of stories. Set against immense political upheaval, or evoking the intimate struggles between men and women, parents and children, this astonishing collection charts our desire for love, our fragility, and our strength. About Rachel Seiffert. Rachel Seiffert’s first novel, The Dark Room, was short-listed for the Booker Prize, won the Los Angeles Times First Fiction Prize, and was the basis for the acclaimed motion picture Lore. She was one of Granta’s Best of Young Britis. ore about Rachel Seiffert.

Guest Rachel Seiffert Rachel Seiffert is an award-winning author based in London, England. Her collection of short stories, Field Study (04), received an award from PEN International. Her first novel, The Dark Room (01), was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and won the Los Angeles Times’ Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction. In 2011 Seiffert received the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her other novels include Afterwards (07) and The Walk Home (14).

Rachel Seiffert, author of The Dark Room, powerfully evokes our need for human connection in this dazzling and haunting group of stories

Rachel Seiffert, author of The Dark Room, powerfully evokes our need for human connection in this dazzling and haunting group of stories.

He had a quiet passion for space, for dimensions, for awe. For comfort, for splendour and for ease. effective building materials, and optimum car-parking arrangements. The architect’s designs were singular. His drawings and his gracious manner somehow inseparable. Bureaucrats with construction millions would comb their hair and run a checking tongue across their dentures in preparation for their meetings

Martin is a graduate student spending a week undertaking scientific field study in a neighbouring, post-Communist country.

Martin is a graduate student spending a week undertaking scientific field study in a neighbouring, post-Communist country.

Rachel Seiffert (born 1971) is a British novelist and short story writer. She was born in 1971 in Oxford to German and Australian parents, and was brought up bilingually. Seiffert has published four works of fiction to date: The Dark Room (2001) is a novel, shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the Guardian First Book Award in 2001, winner of the LA Times Prize for First Fiction and a Betty Trask Award in 2002

From the author of the award-winning The Dark Room, here is a strikingly powerful collection of stories that explores with haunting precision themes of guilt, love, and sacrifice. In a variety of settings–from the Scottish seaside to post—Communist Germany–Rachel Seiffert’s stories map the terrain of human behavior with a nuance and subtlety that are at once dazzling and unsettling. Powerfully evoking our need for connection, Field Study takes us on journeys that demonstrate both the fragility and adaptability of our emotions, and the vast potential for danger and vulnerability created by all types of love. In “Reach,” “Dog-Leg Lane,” and “Tentsmuir Sands,” Seiffert explores the dynamic between parents and children, the special knowing that children have but don’t always express in ways their parents can understand. In “Francis John Jones, 1924—” she draws a portrait of an old man recounting an experience as a soldier in World War II that saved his life but left him with deep regrets. In “The Late Spring,” a man who has led a solitary life begins to accept what he knows will be his solitary death. And in “Blue,” two teenagers try to come to grips, in conflicting ways, with their first pressing desires for independence. Seiffert isolates and captures not only the underlying and compelling sorrow of love but also the joy and desire for love that keep us alive.
  • Globus
A young biologist, running tests for pollution in a border area between two countries, tries to form a relationship with a local woman and her son. A young single mother tries to cope with a difficult, hard-to-reach child. A promising architect has some kind of mental breakdown. A child has some type of mental breakdown, shattering the life of his family. An elderly beekeeper finds himself responsible for a lost child. The young woman from the first story embarks on a hopeless journey in search of the husband who abandoned her. Such are the stories making up this slender volume.

And what happens? Do any of these characters learn from their experiences, turn their situations around, or achieve redemption? Sadly, no. At best, relief, or acceptance.

The stories, most of which take place somewhere in Eastern Europe, after the fall of communism, are uniformly dark and brooding. They are written in a literary style with excruciating description, lots of adjectives. Author Rachel Seiffert is clearly talented, but sometimes her choice of words misses the mark, sometimes in a way that is jarring. She seems to like alliteration, and sometimes gets a bit carried away with it. The stories don't really come to a satisfying ending, they just sort of--end.

Seiffert's characters are intriguing and they do draw the reader in, but, they never seem to grow or learn, they never laugh, and they never triumph. They tend to be kind, good people who want to do the right thing. As a reader I kept hoping for something good to happen to them. If you like this kind of dark, literary fiction, you might like Field Study. Reviewed by Louis N. Gruber
  • Prinna
2 of the stories were OK. the rest were bad. i liked her other book but did not enjoy this one.