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Download Nothing Right: Short Stories eBook

by Antonya Nelson

Download Nothing Right: Short Stories eBook
ISBN:
1596915749
Author:
Antonya Nelson
Category:
Short Stories & Anthologies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA (February 3, 2009)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1824 kb
FB2 book:
1207 kb
DJVU:
1420 kb
Other formats
rtf lrf mbr mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
656


Nothing Right: Short Stories is not light and fluffy fair, it's dark with glimpses of light, hard earned by the . Antonya Nelson does not hand us full realized characters at the start of the story.

Nothing Right: Short Stories is not light and fluffy fair, it's dark with glimpses of light, hard earned by the reader and the characters. She takes us on a perfectly paced journey of character development

Электронная книга "Nothing Right: Short Stories", Antonya Nelson.

Электронная книга "Nothing Right: Short Stories", Antonya Nelson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Nothing Right: Short Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Start by marking Nothing Right: Short Stories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Antonya Nelson (born January 6, 1961) is an American author and teacher of creative writing who writes primarily short stories. Antonya Nelson was born January 6, 1961 in Wichita, Kansas. 251 She received a BA degree from the University of Kansas in 1983 and an MFA degree from the University of Arizona in 1986. 251 She lives in Telluride, Colorado; Las Cruces, New Mexico; and Houston, Texas.

A contemporary master of the short story, Antonya Nelson writes with uncommon grace and unflinching insight about the remarkable realities of everyday existence. The eleven stories in Nothing Right- a selection of Nelson's greatest recent achievements, along with her latest, previously unpublished work-are largely set in her native Kansas, and resonate with deep familiarity.

Two men meet briefly in a hospital, where both are visiting their dying fathers. They speak again just a few months later, when one of them impulsively calls the other, a psychologist, and a friendship of sorts starts to form. Her particular wizardry in the short form (Nelson is also the author of four novels) is found in her exceptional melding of pristine prose with a rampaging imagination and a comic’s perfect timing.

Antonya Nelson's stories are masterpieces: poignant, hilarious, truthful explorations of domesticity. The artfully rendered characters in Nothing Right try to keep themselves intact as their personal lives explode around them. A mother and her teenage son finally find common ground when his girlfriend becomes pregnant. A woman leaves her husband and finds herself living with a stranger who is getting extensive plastic surgery while her best friend is dying of cancer.

The characters in Antonya Nelson’s latest story collection navigate the rocky terrain of adultery and sickness, death and family life. Party of One is among the briefest stories in Antonya Nelson’s new collection, but in its 13 pages it offers a perfect epitome of her fictional universe. The simplest way to summarize the story is to say it describes a man and a woman having a fight in a bar - the kind of banal but psychologically intricate transaction that is a short story writer’s natural terrain. Yet while Emily and Nicholas are fighting about love, they aren’t lovers.

Nothing Right - Antonya Nelson. Antonya Nelson's short stories are at once pointed and universal, each character reminding the reader of someone specific she knows but who also seems to represent the most broad characteristics of the human condition. Nelson creates impressively three-dimensional pictures which feel somehow tragic and hopeful, realist and optimistic. These stories hold up among the very best because these complexities stick in the mind long after the book has been put away. seriousgraceGo to seriousgrace's profile.

It’s not real, he says. Just a bunch of imaginary crap

It’s not real, he says. Just a bunch of imaginary crap. Sure, you could give the kid an argument about Shakespeare, and so could the mother if she, like a lot of Nelson’s characters, weren’t worn down by parenthood. She recognizes, as he does not, that something like the story of a weak king and his bitchy wife has recently played out in his own home. But you also know what.

A collection of stories from one of the New Yorker's "twenty young fiction writers of the new millennium," a series of unforgettable glimpses into contemporary family life. Set in the American Southwest, and featuring one previously unpublished story, Nothing Right shows one of our best writers working at the top of her game. Antonya Nelson's stories are masterpieces: poignant, hilarious, truthful explorations of domesticity.

The artfully rendered characters in Nothing Right try to keep themselves intact as their personal lives explode around them. A mother and her teenage son finally find common ground when his girlfriend becomes pregnant. A woman leaves her husband and finds herself living with a stranger who is getting extensive plastic surgery while her best friend is dying of cancer. In "Or Else," one of three short stories nominated for a National Magazine Award for the New Yorker, a man brings his girlfriend to a house he claims belongs to his family, only to have his lie exposed when one of the real owners comes home to scatter her father's ashes.

These stories are sure to delight longtime fans and readers lucky enough to be just discovering Antonya Nelson.

  • Ffel
I was struck by the wry insight into human nature of which Ms. Nelson kept reminding us. Like from "We and They:" '---could there have been a more perfect child? And naturally, and unfortunately, his parents had not stopped while they were ahead.' The characters of all her stories were endearingly flawed. I got that we probably are too, though seemingly blind to it. A blessing in disguise or our greatest flaw? These stories made me want to think like her. Made me want to read them again---carefully.
  • OwerSpeed
I considered myself a huge fan of Antonya Nelson until this collection. Something has changed. Her latest work reeks of trying too hard to be cool. There's a certain smugness at hand this time around that did not sit well with me either -- is that the author's personal success going to her head or does she just enjoy the sound of her own voice too much? In the past, especially with her collection Female Trouble, I found plenty to relate to with Nelson's characters. This time it felt surfacey, boring, redundant. There was too much about unbelievably wise and snotty children/teens for my taste. And enough with the generic titles already. Nothing Right, whatever.
  • Amis
Although most of these short stories have previously been published in various periodicals, this collection is worth having on the shelf or nightstand for reading and re-reading. Short story writers do not have as great a following as novelists, but Ms. Nelson certainly can attract readers of American fiction with her intense short stories. She has the skill to create a time, place, characters and conflict in a few pages that most novelists need chapters to develop, sort of how an espresso delivers the richness of the same coffee bean you may drink every morning. Your usual drip coffee may be delicious and robust, but the intensity of flavor in that thick liquid hits the senses faster and usually linger longer. Her characters are intensely human with the flaws of humans and the experiences of humans, and they are developed in a few pages so well that I think about them at times in my own daily experiences. American culture is portrayed without the reader realizing that simple and mundane things and events may be really, really important until they are struck with the memory of a story later in the day or the week. I was sold on Ms. Nelson after hearing her discuss the short story on NPR, then listening to her read one of her tales. She obviously is a very astute and observant person, garnering an inventory of true experiences into fictional ideas which she transforms, often metaphorically into her slices of life fiction. Her stories need to be read more than once, which is so easy to do with this genre of literature.
  • salivan
Nothing Right: Short Stories is not light and fluffy fair, it's dark with glimpses of light, hard earned by the reader and the characters. It shows the darkness and the resilience of individuals and the human spirit, without resorting to heroics of chicken soup for the character's soul...Gritty and real...

Antonya Nelson does not hand us full realized characters at the start of the story. She takes us on a perfectly paced journey of character development. The main character, in the title story "Nothing Right" is revealed in tiny little delicious bites, just as soon as you accept and can begin to relate, a little more is revealed to digest... It an interesting dichotomy - the love/hate relationship of the reader with the character and the ability to relate to them and relate to even their darkest moments that makes the short story work. I think Nelson has a brilliant and strong grasp of developing almost a tidal rhythm of character exposition.

It's this balance, and the very real situations these characters find themselves in, that reminds me so much of Raymond Carver. There is a darkness that is given to us by Nelson, but it isn't in the least bit macabre, it is very real and human. It's a pleasure to read short stories with such intensity and characters who breathe and rage and love and hurt themselves right off the page.

Nelson's writing style is a comfortable cadence of action, observations, dialog, and internal monologue that gives the reader the feeling of being a voyeur, a psychologist, a social worker, a friend... It also delivers the quirks and the more negative bits about the character in such perfect doses, that we can see ourselves a bit and accept the characters so that we are really on a journey with them.

(If you like this, I also recommend Raymond Carver's collection "Where I'm calling from"...)
  • SmEsH
This is one of the most talented writers I had an opportunity to read recently. Her latest book "Nothing Right" is a collection of stories that are each compelling in both topic and narrative. Sometimes, when one reads story collections they can be uneven. That is not the case with Ms. Nelson's stories - each one of these is strong and can stand on its own. Stories are about contemporary families, women approaching 40 struggling with their own internal emotional turmoils caused by their families or their inner lives. I have realized that three of the stories int his book I read in the New Yorker Magazine some time ago ("Shauntrelle", "Kansas" and "Or Else") , but I was so glad to read them again. My most favorite ones are the last two in the book - "We and They" and "People People". Both are humorous and sad at the same time but also complicated in the intriguing way. I am definitely Ms. Nelson's fan and I am looking forward to reading her other fiction work.