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by Sonya Taaffe,Tim Pratt

Download Singing Innocence and Experience eBook
ISBN:
0809550709
Author:
Sonya Taaffe,Tim Pratt
Category:
Short Stories & Anthologies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Prime (June 15, 2005)
Pages:
276 pages
EPUB book:
1322 kb
FB2 book:
1232 kb
DJVU:
1234 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
466


Sonya Taaffe, Singing Innocence and Experience (Prime, 2005).

Sonya Taaffe, Singing Innocence and Experience (Prime, 2005). If there is a fault it is that read back to back the voice begins to sound a bit too similar story to story, the emotional register seems pitched always the same.

Sonya Taaffe is a Massachusetts-based author of short fiction and poetry Singing Innocence and Experience (a collection, 2005, Prime Books).

Sonya Taaffe is a Massachusetts-based author of short fiction and poetry. She grew up in Arlington and Lexington, MA and graduated from Brandeis University in 2003 where she received a BA and MA in Classical Studies. She also received an MA in Classical Studies from Yale University in 2008  . Singing Innocence and Experience (a collection, 2005, Prime Books). On the Blindside (2005).

Singing Innocence and Experience book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Singing Innocence and Experience as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780809544790.

Singing Innocence And Experience. Sonya Taaffe, Tim Pratt. Singing Innocence And Experience. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Singing Innocence And Experience from your list? Contributors. Published June 27, 2005 by Prime Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. 2005) A collection of stories by Sonya Taaffe

Singing Innocence and Experience. 2005) A collection of stories by Sonya Taaffe. The Devil's School lies down this way. Lot's wife knows your name. Hearts hang in the scales, flesh and clay are one and the same, and the severed head of Orpheus sings in winter waves.

Hearts hang in the scales, flesh and clay are one and the same, and the severed head of Orpheus sings in winter waves. These songs of innocence and experience, Blake never knew. Sonya Taaffe; Tim Pratt.

Singing Innocence and Experience (2005, Prime Books). Encyclopedia Article. (April 2005) Interview with Sonya Taaffe. Geoffrey H. Goodwin, Bookslut.

The Devil's School lies down this way. Lot's wife knows your name. Hearts hang in the scales, flesh and clay are one and the same, and the severed head of Orpheus sings in winter waves. In award-winning poet Sonya Taaffe's first collection of short fiction, the boundaries between worlds dissolve to reveal unmasked harlequins and women made of stars, serpentine plagues and New England storm gods, and many other denizens of the spaces between. These songs of innocence and experience, Blake never knew.
  • Alsath
I was looking for examples of mythpunk authors ad Sonya Taaffe was one of the ladies that popped onto my radar. I picked a few authors that looked interesting, but Sonya Taaffe was the first I read within this genre -- what an introduction!

Her goal -- to bring her poetry (some of which is sprinkled throughout the book) into prose -- is clear and successful. She writes decadent prose that cares more so for its delivery and emotion than for its content; her work is not about plot, but rather about the characters and their psyche. Her stories, especially those within this book, are simple. They're often about love and/or a relationship between two people. This is, of course, intertwined with fantastical elements, mostly reinterpreted mythology.

If you like Angela Carter, then give Sonya Taaffe a try.
  • Urtte
Sonya Taaffe, Singing Innocence and Experience (Prime, 2005)

I feel like something of a sycophant writing this review so soon after writing my review for Ms. Taaffe's other extant book, Postcards from the Province of Hyphens. I don't mean to be. I mean, it's not like I'm going to get scads of free dinners out of it or anything, since she lives hundreds of miles away. Postcards got, and Singing gets, rave reviews for one simple reason: they're brilliant.

Whereas Postcards was mainly poetry interspersed with a little prose, Singing goes the other way. Some pieces are repeated in the two books, but each of them is worth reading twice, even in relatively quick succession. But I've already sung the praises of Taaffe's short work in other places. What matters in the review are the longer stories. I mentioned in a recent review (of Charles Simic's memoirs) the truism that poets and short story writers are, with very rare exceptions, a different breed of animal altogether; those who can write excellent poetry are more often than not simply above-average storytellers. Good, but not as brilliant as they are poets. And the same usually holds true going the other way. Taaffe is one of those rare creatures who, it seems, is capable of doing both at the highest level of ability. Actually, if anything, she's slightly better at short stories. I rush to add, however, I had a lot more pages of short stories with which to judge.

Each of the stories here is a winner. The reader will no doubt find his own favorite (I honestly can't imagine anyone coming into this collection and not liking a single offering), but mine is the relatively early "Constellations, Conjunctions," whose simple beauty is so well offset by Taaffe's Corinthian prose (which, in the story, is still a relatively nascent being; you can tell she was younger when she wrote it than, say, "Clay Lies Still" or "Storm Gods of the Connecticut River Valley").

The stories here are perhaps best categorized as fantasy, though I think they're really unclassifiable; they deal in the unexplained, alternate worlds, all the sort of thing that fantasy stories deal in, but like the work of Lucius Shepard or Wendy Walker, Taaffe's fantasies feel far more like period pieces, though her chosen period, in most cases, is the present day; there's still that slight breath of mustiness between the words, the same one has when one opens a long-undisturbed book and holds it to one's nose, inhaling deeply.

The book gets four and a half rather than five stars for something completely not Taaffe's fault. There's an odd typo on the last two stories; it's so odd, in fact, it looks deliberate. If it is a coincidence, it's a right weird one. I won't spoil it for you; you'll ave to look for yourself.

I cannot sing Sonya Taaffe's praises loud (or, rest assured, tunelessly) enough. I can't wait for book number 3, whatever form it may take. **** ½
  • Bundis
I first read the work of Sonya Taaffe in the pages of Caitlin R. Kiernan's Sirenia Digest. It was a reprint of "Constellations, Conjunctions" and after reading it, I immediately ordered Singing Innocence and Experience. This book is gorgeously written in a very lyrical style. Many of the stories read as a sort of prose poetry, while the poems included are equally effective. I strongly recommend this book to all. And for more and previously unpublished works by Sonya Taaffe, check out Sirenia Digest here: [...]
  • Delirium
Sonya Taaffe is a writer of some of the most intense and image-drenched prose around. Line by long, exquisite, line her writing is desperate and involving. Indeed she made her first major impression on me as a poet - and I think she may be the best poet working in the SF genre right now. But she has also been publishing short stories all over the place, often on mythical or traditional fantastical themes but always individual and always centered on a central character's obsession. As I have intimated, the prose is really striking, lush, very poetical. In his introduction Tim Pratt suggests among others Theodore Sturgeon as an influence, and that seems apposite: not just in her thematic concerns but in the desperate feel to some of the prose. If there is a fault it is that read back to back the voice begins to sound a bit too similar story to story, the emotional register seems pitched always the same. (And here a look at Sturgeon is instructive - he being a writer who could and did vary his register greatly.) But this is a mild fault - taken each by itself the stories are moving jewels, and Taaffe seems a writer poised to grow into her powers. (Indeed, her latest stories, not included here, seem to me to be her best yet.)

Singing Innocence and Experience is an excellent introduction to Taaffe's work. It collects 16 stories and 7 poems, dating back to 2001. The poems are characteristic of her work, with the same long lines and sharp images as the prose, and with thank goodness complete and logical sentences: not just syntactical elements thrown against the wall is with some poets.

My favorites among the stories include "Constellations, Conjunctions", a very early piece. It's a sweet and mysterious story about a young man, an astronomer, who falls for a young woman with the significant name of Stella, and with a curious quality to her skin. "Featherweight" is another pure love story (as indeed are many of these stories love stories, and emotionally true love stories, of one sort or another), about a man looking for a heart for a mysterious creature - woman? Machine? Alien? No prizes for guessing where he finds it, but the story gets to its conclusion in a lovely fashion. Back to back stories deal with people obsessed with the sea. "Till Human Voices Wake Us" is about a teenaged boy staying for the summer with his older sister who loves a merman; and "A Ceiling of Amber, a Pavement of Pearl" concerns a woman commissioned to write a song for a man trying to find again the city under the sea he saw while drowning.

For the most part these stories are set in what seems to be our world, our time, though the slant viewpoint, and the gorgeous prose, give the settings a fantastical gloss. But occasionally Taaffe takes us elsewhere, as with "Time May Be", set in strange Aruis, and telling of a mysterious woman, Josza, perhaps not human, who takes in a lost young man. Images of the tarot mix with slow revelations of Josza's past and of the geography of Aruis.

Each story is a heady brew. The poems are similarly striking. As I said, perhaps the stories cluster around too similar emotional poles - and perhaps at times they go on a bit too long. But they remain fascinating, and the collection is at once fine work and a promise of even better work to come.