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Download Objects In Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear eBook

by Katharine Weber

Download Objects In Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear eBook
ISBN:
0517598906
Author:
Katharine Weber
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Crown; 1st edition (March 28, 1995)
Pages:
262 pages
EPUB book:
1661 kb
FB2 book:
1590 kb
DJVU:
1253 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
133


The phrase "objects in (the) mirror are closer than they appear" is a safety warning that is required to be engraved on passenger side mirrors of motor vehicles in the United States, Canada, Nepal, India, and Saudi Arabia

The phrase "objects in (the) mirror are closer than they appear" is a safety warning that is required to be engraved on passenger side mirrors of motor vehicles in the United States, Canada, Nepal, India, and Saudi Arabia. It is present because while these mirrors' convexity gives them a useful field of view, it also makes objects appear smaller.

KATHARINE WEBER is the author of True Confections, Triangle, The Little Women, and The Music Lesson. Books Two and Three are told in third person

KATHARINE WEBER is the author of True Confections, Triangle, The Little Women, and The Music Lesson. She lives in Connecticut with her husband, the cultural historian Nicholas Fox Weber. Books Two and Three are told in third person. Book Two fleshes out Harriet's personality by giving her family background and childhood stories, cumulating in a situation not dissimilar from the one she faces now. Book Three picks up where Harriet's journal leaves off and follows Anne and Victor and Harriet to the conclusion. I was disappointed by Anne's character.

She was for seven years the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College. Her new novel, Still Life With Monkey, is just out from Paul Dry Books. Katharine's fiction debut in print, the short story "Friend of the Family," appeared in The New Yorker in January, 1993. She was for seven years the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College

It’s incredibly complicated here. And the oddest thing. I can’t find the letter journal I’ve been keeping since I got here. It’s just a spiral notebook.

It’s incredibly complicated here. It’s just a spiral notebook o the park yesterday, but it wasn’t in the flat when I got back in the afternoon, and Anne says it wasn’t there when she and Victor came in during the middle of the day. Maybe I’ve left it on some park bench or in some café. I could swear it was either in my tote bag or on the table in the flat, and now it’s gone. Pages and pages and pages. I just can’t believe.

Weber, Katharine, 1955-. Americans, Young women, Friendship. New York : Crown Publishers. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

An intelligent first novel, already excerpted in the New Yorker, that admirably avoids melodrama but sometimes tries too hard to be witty as it wrestles with the darkness beneath its glossy surface. Written in the form of journal entries, recollections, and finally as a straightforward narrative, it is a story of friendship between two young women of similar backgrounds, each burdened by an unhappy past. When 26-year-old award-winning photographer Harriet Rose arrives to spend a month in Geneva taking pictures, she bunks with her old Greenwich Village roommate, Anne Gordon

It will be fascinating to see what Weber does next.

It will be fascinating to see what Weber does next.

Already excerpted in The New Yorker, Katharine Weber's witty first novel of attraction and deception, a tale with the sensibility of a Margaret Atwood, pulses with cultural references and word games that echo Nabokov. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. Objects in mirror are closer than they appear. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. An intelligent first novel, already excerpted in the New Yorker, that admirably avoids melodrama but sometimes tries too hard to be witty as it wrestles with the darkness beneath its glossy surface.

Already excerpted in The New Yorker, Katherine Weber's witty first novel of attraction and deception, a tale with the sensibility of a Margaret Atwood, pulses with cultural references and word games that echo Nabokov.
  • Cia
Photographer Harriet Rose, in Geneva for a month on a travel fellowship, is staying with her former roommate Anne, who had left their Greenwich Village apartment to follow her recently acquired married lover to Switzerland. Harriet finds Anne, this "strange new mistress-person" she's become, wholly changed from the woman she knew in New York, smothering under the demands of an oppressive relationship with her Victor, a fastidious, subtly abusive, toeless Auschwitz survivor. In a journal addressed to--but not necessarily intended to be read by--her new boyfriend Benedict, Harriet chronicles the absurd and dark relationship she is forced to witness at close quarters. Happily, she is an excellent observer of minutiae and a witty reporter. Of a dinner out with the unhappy couple, for example, Harriet writes:

"'I will take the steak,' Victor said to the waiter--rather imperiously, I thought. Why did it bother me so? I will take the steak. I have no toes, so I will not merely have, as others do, but I will take. I survived Auschwitz, so I can cheat on my wife and I will take the steak."

The first part of Katharine Weber's Objects in Mirror are Closer than they Appear, then, is epistolary, the stories of Anne and Harriet told by the latter in a series of lengthy, nicely written letters. In the remaining two-thirds of the book, related in third-person prose, Harriet's back story is fleshed out--her privileged but profoundly sad childhood, with its parallels to her current situation. Finally, the story returned to the present day, Anne's relationship with the enigmatic Victor meets its greatest challenge.

Objects in Mirror are Closer than they Appear is a wonderful book, layered, poignant, and beautifully written, and it comes highly recommended.

Reviewed by Debra Hamel, author of Trying Neaira: The True Story of a Courtesan's Scandalous Life in Ancient Greece
  • Hurus
Harriet Rose is in Geneva, combining a travel fellowship with visiting her best friend Anne, who had rather recently moved to Geneva to be with her married, much older lover, Victor. What Harriet finds is an Anne unrecognizable from her best friend and former roommate. . . an Anne so dominated by Victor and his subtle (and some not so subtle) controls that she ceases to have an identity of her own and exists merely as Victor's mistress.
Harriet desperately wants to rescue Anne from what she perceives as a harmful relationship. Anne is uncertain as to her to own desires and motives. Victor, the forceful former-Auschwitz survivor, has his own agenda. This odd triangle reaches the point-of-no-return as the reader waits to see just what will happen.
The novel is written in three parts. Book One is a journal of sorts, in which Harriet records her concerns for Anne, along with her observations of Anne and Victor. She writes this journal in letters addressed to her boyfriend, Benedict, and uses it as a sounding board for her concerns and frustrations. This is by far the best part of the book. Harriet's observations are witty and scintillating, and at the same time piercing, as she tries to penetrate through Anne's "strange new mistress/person".
Books Two and Three are told in third person. Book Two fleshes out Harriet's personality by giving her family background and childhood stories, cumulating in a situation not dissimilar from the one she faces now. Book Three picks up where Harriet's journal leaves off and follows Anne and Victor and Harriet to the conclusion.
I was disappointed by Anne's character. Even knowing that her true personality was being overshadowed by Victor, I never caught so much as a glimpse of "her". She appeared two-dimensional and I did not find myself as concerned for her as I should. Harriet, on the other hand, was a delightful character, full of life and enthusiasm and spirit. I enjoyed her journal immensely.
Despite my complaints, this is a solidly good book and worth a read.
  • Bukus
I had an intuition about reading this book and I was right. It's rich, dense, withstructural decisions with which one might not agree, BUT it is wonderfully memorable, complex, a rare great read. In addition, as said in my long title, above, reading this as a writer: it's a goldmine. Because Ms. Weber carries this book with a consciousness that mixes the mundane life we all live with a literary savvy we can also enjoy (what some of us live too). To put this simply: the plot can take anyone along but the real treat is to see how an "intellectual" can create an accessible world that has so many philosophical and photographic insights also dispersed throughout. I read the middle flashback section after the first and last because I needed to keep with chronology. But, however you choose to read this, do so. Recommended for those who love a good read and recommended especially for writers. Many many tricks of the trade are embedded if one reads this with a writer's eye. Thanks, Ms. Weber, for a book that seriously challanged this non-fiction writer to reach for more range in my own work. A marvel.
  • Mautaxe
This is a compelling story of two friends whose lives intertwined, widely diverged, and then were brought back together. Harriet is sincere and appealing, while Anne is something of a cipher. Too much seems to have changed for their friendship to be what it was. And each carries excess baggage from traumatic events in their families. The new men in their lives are catalysts, and the effects are devastating for one friend.
I was captured immediately by the wonderful voice the author gave the narrator. My interest never flagged.