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by Bruce Bethke

Download Rebel Moon eBook
ISBN:
0671002368
Author:
Bruce Bethke
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pocket (November 1, 1996)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1484 kb
FB2 book:
1257 kb
DJVU:
1824 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
368


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. 2069: After decades of futility, the United Nations has finally done what it was designed to do: established peace on Planet Earth.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In the wake of a bogus peace treaty on the planet Earth in 2069, fifty thousand desperate rebel lunar colonists turn to techno-geek hacker Dalton Starkiller to lead an impossible revolt.

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REBEL MOON Bruce Bethke and Vox Day 2069: After decades of futility, the United Nations has finally done what it was designed to do: established peace on Planet Earth.

REBEL MOON Bruce Bethke and Vox Day 2069: After decades of futility, the United Nations has finally done what it was designed to do: established peace on Planet Earth. and. Vox Day. Soldiers, warriors, brave and true.

Rebel Moon: A collaboration with Vox Day, Rebel Moon was the novelization of the prequel of the game Rebel Moon . Bruce replied, "Ah, well, hindsight is 20/20. The book was never released because the publisher hated the ending and I refused to rewrite it.

Rebel Moon: A collaboration with Vox Day, Rebel Moon was the novelization of the prequel of the game Rebel Moon Rising. The main plot is similar to The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, though the book itself focuses on a few individual characters and their battles in the war, and not the political and economic ramifications of a battle for independence on the moon. Wild Wild West: The novelization of the critically panned steampunk western comedy film Wild Wild West.

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In Rebel Moon, by authors Bruce Bethke and Vox Day, the cost is a lunar rebellion. Rebel Moon is a fastpaced, fun sci-fi book. Set in 2069, the various colonies of the moon have revolted against the United Nations and declared their independence

In Rebel Moon, by authors Bruce Bethke and Vox Day, the cost is a lunar rebellion. Based on a video game by Fenris Wolf, this surprisingly enjoyable Sci-Fi novel charts the course of an independence movement by lunar colonists in the year 2069. The story focuses on the exploits of Dalton Starkiller, a moon resident and expert tech guy who finds himself defending his adopted world from military action by United Nations soldiers. Set in 2069, the various colonies of the moon have revolted against the United Nations and declared their independence. The UN is not happy and responds by sending in peacekeepers to pacify things.

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Peace is finally established on Earth. Too bad Dalton Starkiller is what they've got-Stakiller's a techno-geek hacker, not a hero. Can he inspire his fellow rebels' hopeless revolt against Earth? Can he even shoot straight?

In the wake of a bogus peace treaty on the planet Earth in 2069, fifty thousand desperate rebel lunar colonists turn to techno-geek hacker Dalton Starkiller to lead an impossible revolt. Original.
  • Keath
I read this about twelve years ago and totally forgot about it. I did a search on descent scifi paperbacks and remembered it when I saw it. Surprisingly well written and a good story line. Characters are easy to associate with and develop well throughout. The ending left room for a sequel so you basically end up shorthanded. All in all very good especially for the price.
  • Ckelond
Tale about what it might be like if the Earth's food was grown hydrophonically on the Moon and the people in charge on the Moon decide they don't want the burden of Earth's direction.

Starts out with a guy named Starkiller (shades of Skywalker?) playing a World of Warcraft type game (written in 1996 and based on a video game) he gets involved in the revolution, his gal gets killed.

From Earth a gal soilder named Bunny is sent on a shuttle with some other soilders to take control of the rebels, all but her are soon gone. We get an almost moment-by-moment update between the U.N., the Moon people in charge, and the fighters. Then, TWO WEEKS LATER, still fightin'. People contiue to get introduced and then dismissed from the pages of the book, was suprised by the characters as they appear to be from central casting in their one-dimentional character--being from Texas, Japan, or England.

We go through pages before we get back to some of the characters. People are shooting ray guns emitting different colors of rays, we do not know if the different colors mean or do anything different. There is some transporter equipment involved.

Then toward the end there are some aliens tossed in. Starkiller and Bunny end up fighting shoulder to shoulder. A lumbering read, did get one good quote: Bravery is fear of being a coward. Other than that, pass on this book. Read something like Enterprise Stardust (Perry Rhodan, #1) you will be more entertained.
  • Freighton
What is the price for peace on Earth?

In Rebel Moon, by authors Bruce Bethke and Vox Day, the cost is a lunar rebellion. Based on a video game by Fenris Wolf, this surprisingly enjoyable Sci-Fi novel charts the course of an independence movement by lunar colonists in the year 2069.

The story focuses on the exploits of Dalton Starkiller, a moon resident and expert tech guy who finds himself defending his adopted world from military action by United Nations soldiers. Workers on the moon provide the majority of food and other necessities for Earth dwellers, but they get very little for themselves. The workforce consists of misfits, criminals and military castoffs, hardly the making of a cohesive army. But much like the rebels who fought for America's independence from England in the Eighteenth Century, these oddballs make for a determined and formidable fighting force.

The novel also tells the stories of others involved in the conflict, both on the moon and on Earth. This leads to the major problem with the book. There are jarring changes in POV and the number of characters who appear can cause some confusion to the reader. The ending is also a bit rushed and it seems to be setting up a sequel. However, these factors did not keep me from enjoying the book. There are many terrific action scenes that keep the story moving, and there are thought-provoking developments that prove to be the strength of the novel. Sci-Fi fans of all levels will enjoy this fun ride.

Steven Donahue was a copywriter for TV Guide magazine for 14 years. His first novel, Amanda Rio, was published in 2004. It has received critical acclaim from reviewers for Amazon.com and thebestreviews.com. Steven currently resides in Bucks County, PA with his wife, Dawn. He has two new novels that were released in 2013: The Manila Strangler (Rainstorm Press) and Amy the Astronaut and the Flight for Freedom (Hydra Publications).
  • Budar
Rebel Moon the book is based on Rebel Moon the computer game, one of two put out by Vox Day's early 90s game company before it folded in a legal dispute over a third, and I suspect that the game was (not so) loosely based on Heinlein's "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress."

That being the case, the similarities are significant: the UN runs the world, a small group of lunar colonists feed a significant part of earth's hungry population, the colonists decide a la the Spirit of '76 that it's time to go it alone. There's a spiritual leader who gives his life for the cause ("Prof." in Mistress, von Hayek - nice libertarian name, that one - in Rebel Moon), a computer geek who serves as the focal point (Mannie/Dalton), an advanced computer to plan strategery (Mike/General Consensus), help "Earthside" (Stu La Jolie/Lord Haversham) though they assist for different reasons, and in each case the food transports serve as the booty for which the war is played out between the Earth's bureaucrats and the Lunar Rebels.

Rebel Moon really moves after a slow start, and Vox's anti-fascist, anti-UN, and gamer-to-the-end heart shines thru in much of the characterization, though I suspect Bethke did most of the writing - at least his name headlines the cover. I most enjoyed the scene in which Haversham, exposed as a mole by a UN assistant with an almost miraculous gift for research, requests a final cigarette before his hastily-arranged lethal injection in a UN prison/hospital. "I'm sorry," the nurse replies in perfunctory bureaucratic fashion, "this is a smoke-free building." Oh, the ironies of collectivism!

Rivetting battles rage between white knights (and a few oriental ones), conscripted UN blue-helmets, and wickedly efficient black-suited stormtroopers (these of the New German Unity, once again pursuing their historical Germanic shenanigans). The latter decide to go into business for themselves when the UN effort to re-capture the colony flounders - as in Mistress, the earth's unity is more formal than real, and the demands of geopolitics ensure that the rebels have at least a minimal opportunity to divide if not conquer - and the war peters out with the UN scheming to re-take several captured domes (colonies) from the Germans.

But unlike Mistress (and to be honest, most disappointing to me) the book's end does not bring victory or even real defeat. Like the final chapter of a bad Agatha Christie novel, the ground beneath the struggle shifts, new factors are introduced - as Truman Capote raged in the finale of Murder by Death: "You introduced characters in the last few pages that were never in the book before" - and the heroes are overshadowed by circumstance before they fade into insignificance.

The way it occurs is clever, the implementation frustrating. You see, Dalton is a gamer, and in the opening scene he's locked in epic battle with a fericious monster alongside one of his pals. But as a thief (Finn Fingers) he's not much good in combat, so his companion, playing a barbarian in the online game, heroically sends Dalton off to find a magical key while he fights the monster alone. The dialogue is replayed word-for-word in "real life" later as they battle stormtroopers. At the end the battle itself is re-lived, this time against a real-life dragon, or rather a huge red bug that belches plasma, and the creature is defeated. Instead of being an evil menace, however, it turns out the bug is a mother-creature of some aliens who have been using abandoned moon mines as a birthing chamber, aliens who have been providing the colonists with the technology that has allowed them to fight off their more numerous earthworm opponents. Killing the bug - which rather than being heroic "may go down in history books as one of the biggest screw-ups of all time" - results in Dalton and several of the heroes being beamed away into exile as the moon rebellion ostensibly fails.

Such twist was apparently part of the later Vox game "Rebel Moon Rising." Unfortunately, as I never played the game, this unexpected discovery overwhelms the battle for freedom - both in my mind and the minds of the fighting factions - making the emotional investment in the story pretty much a sunk cost. Vox, economics major that he is, would certainly understand my desire not to invest anything further in the venture.