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by Dawn Powell

Download The Golden Spur eBook
ISBN:
1883642272
Author:
Dawn Powell
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Zoland Books (June 1, 1998)
Pages:
264 pages
EPUB book:
1522 kb
FB2 book:
1126 kb
DJVU:
1947 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
567


Dawn Powell's "The Golden Spur" was her last novel and the first book of hers I read.

Dawn Powell's "The Golden Spur" was her last novel and the first book of hers I read. Jonathan's mother had worked as a typist briefly in the Village before she returned home and married what she found a rather conventional man. She delivered prematurely and told Jonathan that his true father was in New York.

The Golden Spur (novel). "Dawn Powell, Novelist, Is Dead; Author of Witty, Satirical Books; Middle Class Was the Object of Her Stinging Fiction-13 Books Published", The New York Times, November 16, 1965

The Golden Spur (novel). "Dawn Powell, Novelist, Is Dead; Author of Witty, Satirical Books; Middle Class Was the Object of Her Stinging Fiction-13 Books Published", The New York Times, November 16, 1965. Miss Powell, who had resided in Greenwich Village most of her life, maintained an apartment at 95 Christopher Street, where she did most of her writing in recent years. The book centers around The Golden Spur, a bar in Greenwich Village frequented by artists and literary types. It had been frequented by Jonathan's mother in her New York days).

Meet artists, writers, and low-lifes - and guess which is which. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. Powell's last novel takes a delightfully satiric look at the artistic life in Greenwich Village during the mid-twentieth century. Jonathan Jamison makes a lot of new friends when he comes to New York hoping to determine the identity of his biological father.

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1st Vintage Books ed. External-identifier.

Birthparents - Fiction, Ohio - Fiction, New York (. 1st Vintage Books ed. urn:asin:067972687X urn:acs6:goldenspur00powe 0:pdf:09e-83424f38b9c4 urn:acs6:goldenspur00powe 0:epub:4c2-0e1b14d4d321 urn:oclc:record:1035313223. Columbia University Libraries.

Everyone in Dawn Powell's New York satire Angels on Toast is on the make: Lou Donovan, the entrepeneur who ricochets frantically between his well-connected current wife, his disreputable ex, and his dangerously greedy mistress; Trina Kameray, t. .

Everyone in Dawn Powell's New York satire Angels on Toast is on the make: Lou Donovan, the entrepeneur who ricochets frantically between his well-connected current wife, his disreputable ex, and his dangerously greedy mistress; Trina Kameray, the exotic adventuress whose job title is as phony as her accent; . Truesdale, the man with the aristocratic manner, the fourteen-dollar suit, and the hyperactive eye for the main chance. A dizzyingly fast-paced and deliriously entertaining novel.

Clothing The volume concludes with Powell’s final novel, The Golden Spur (1962), in which she drew on her time spent among painters at the famed Cedar.

Dawn Powell's New York novels are exactly what she wanted them to be: "crystal in quality, sharp as the skyline, and relentlessly true. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The volume concludes with Powell’s final novel, The Golden Spur (1962), in which she drew on her time spent among painters at the famed Cedar Tavern for an affectionate if pointed satire on Manhattan’s art world.

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IF A YOUNG MAN finds his own father inconveniently ordinary, can he choose another? Jonathan Jaimison, the engagingly amoral hero, comes to New York from Silver City, Ohio for exactly such a purpose. Combing through his mother’s diaries and the bars and cafés of Greenwich Village, Jonathan seeks out the writer or painter whose youthful indiscretion he believes he might have been, all the while committing numerous indiscretions of his own. By the end of the novel, Jonathan has figured out not only his paternity, but his maternity, and best of all, himself. Published in 1962, The Golden Spur was Dawn Powell’s last novel.
  • Kashicage
Dawn Powell is a great novelist and this book is my favorite of all her satirical novels. Set in Greenwich Village of the 50s, there is still much recognizable in the boozing, conniving characters who are drawn by Powell with exquisite humor and understanding. Be prepared to laugh aloud!
  • Skrimpak
It's a period piece--entertaining to me because I was around that scene at the time, but not a great work of art by any stretch.
  • romrom
Powell's last novel takes a delightfully satiric look at the artistic life in Greenwich Village during the mid-twentieth century. Jonathan Jamison makes a lot of new friends when he comes to New York hoping to determine the identity of his biological father. Will he make as big a splash as his mother did during her brief sojourn? It certainly looks like it, seeing how quick everyone is to help him out. But do they really care about this handsome, but rather clueless young mid-Westerner, or are they only using him for their own purposes? Either way, you can be sure that everything will work out all right in the end.

The plot has a wispy, meandering quality to it, perhaps to reflect how Jamison doesn't seem to have any clear-cut plan of what he's doing when he comes to the big city, and so few of the other characters are ever sober enough to do more than react as situations arise. But the marvelous portraits of the various personalities found in that time and place make this book more than worthwhile all by themselves. Not surprisingly, the women are particularly well-drawn. And while there's not a lot character development, we do get to meet wonderfully comic examples of the various types who frequent the artsy/dive bar that gives this volume its name. Between the has-beens, the woulda-beens, the success stories, and the hangers-on (and how thin the lines between these categories really are) Powell makes this little subculture come alive with artistic verve. Tame enough for young people (but not children) this is a must for those who are considering making a career of the artistic life.
  • SupperDom
One of the joys of reading is the opportunity of finding for oneself authors that have long been obscure or overlooked. I came to Dawn Powell's work with expectations of such a reward. I knew that the Library of America had saw fit to publish two volumes of her work and that Tim Page, Washington Post classical music critic, had edited the volumes and written a biography. I was eager to learn more.

Dawn Powell grew up in rural Ohio and moved to Greenwich Village as a young woman and lived a bohemian life. She wrote 15 novels between the 1930s and the early 1960s mostly set in rural Ohio and Greenwich Village, which were little noted during her life. She has been "rediscovered" and praised highly by some.

Dawn Powell's "The Golden Spur" was her last novel and the first book of hers I read. The book tells the story of Jonathan Jamison who, at the age of 26 leaves his Ohio home in search of his father in Greenwich Village. Jonathan's mother had worked as a typist briefly in the Village before she returned home and married what she found a rather conventional man. She delivered prematurely and told Jonathan that his true father was in New York. And Jonathan goes to search for his father --- and himself.

The book centers around The Golden Spur, a bar in Greenwich Village frequented by artists and literary types. (It had been frequented by Jonathan's mother in her New York days). We meet a cast of characters who become involved with Jonathan, including Hugow, the bohemian modern painter of questionable talent, a succession of Hugow's former lovers, some of whom are bedded by Johnathan, failed literary critics, academics, has-beens and never wases. We also meet an elderly woman named Claire Van Orphen, the writer for whom Johnathan's mother worked briefly. She befriends Johnathan and is instrumental in his search.

I couldn't recommend reading this book for the story-line. It is muddled and hard to follow at times. Nevertheless, I came away from the book thinking that my search to discover a new author had been rewarded.

This book is written in a beautiful clear prose. Each line tells and each word is in place. It is a joy to read. The satire in the book is uncompromising and biting. Because the book is a satire, the characters are somewhat one-sided. In addition, I get the impression that Dawn Powell put some part of herself (but not her whole character) in each of the people in her book-- the young person (Jonathan Jamison) leaving rural Ohio for a new life in New York City, the young sexually active women in the Village, the struggling artists, the aging unsuccessful writer to take some examples. Thus I found the characterization effective.

The book works better as a series of miniature episodes than as a connected novel. Each scene is tightly written and convincing written, as I indicated, in a lively and supple style. I got absorbed in the book page by page and incident by incident. Possibly as a result of this, there were times when I lost the thread of the story and the interrelationship of the characters.

The best part of the book, besides the writing style, is the picture drawn of Greenwich Village. The picture of life in the bars and of artists, some good some not-so-good, struggling in flats with their women, their friends and their agents is precious. Dawn Powell knew the life she described. Again, most of the characters, from the young man, Jonathan Jamison, through the women, through the aging Ms. Van Orphen, were aspects of Dawn Powell herself, transmitted into one character or the other.

This is a frothy, light book not without its flaws. But I came away with the sense of discovery for which I had hoped. Dawn Powell deserves to be read.

Robin Friedman
  • BeatHoWin
Powell continues an examination of her Manhattan circle that reached its zenith in 1948's astutely charactered, insightful satire *The Locusts Have No King,* was broadened to farce in 1954's *Wicked Pavilion,* and in 1962 broadened further to lampoon in *The Golden Spur.* Her novels became progressively faster-paced, less nuanced, shorter, and less keenly psychological as she moved through substantial chronic illnesses that finally claimed her life a couple of years after *Spur* was published. Her compromised health shows in the comedic breakneck pace of this last book and her comedy was less lancet than affectionate mockery by this point. Although not in the glow of health while writing this, Powell was able to josh with characters inspired by the antics of her Hemingway-Guggenheim-Kline peers, her objective in this novel to portray the self-delusions that were now not so maddening but rather so very comical.
  • Gnng
dawn powell at her best, what a read!