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Download Galatea in 2-D eBook

by Aaron Allston

Download Galatea in 2-D eBook
ISBN:
0671721828
Author:
Aaron Allston
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Baen Books (July 1, 1993)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1679 kb
FB2 book:
1316 kb
DJVU:
1265 kb
Other formats
docx lrf mobi rtf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
353


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. When illustrator Roger Simons realizes that he has the power to pull living beings from his paintings.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Aaron Dale Allston (December 8, 1960 – February 27, 2014) was an American game designer and author of many science fiction books, notably Star Wars novels. His works as a game designer include game supplements for role-playing games, several of which served to establish the basis for products and subsequent development of TSR's Dungeons & Dragons game setting Mystara

The little nymph even comes out of the drawing to walk.

When illustrator Roger Simons realizes that he has the power to pull. The little nymph even comes out of the drawing to walk. They do look like Kevin's painting of Achilles and Penthesilea, but Kevin doesn't use live models any more. Roger, in the heat of the moment, manages to thrust himself into a different painting, one of his own.

Download books for free. Galatea In 2-D. Allston Aaron.

My mom told me about "Galatea in 2-D" around 1993, when it first came out. 12 years, two states, and several relocations later, I finally cracked the book open to see what all the fuss was about. The title evokes images of a creator in love with his creation, and in that regard Galatea in 2-D is faithful: Illustrator Roger Simons discovers that his painting of a magical nymph comes to life in full, three dimensional form.

Used availability for Aaron Allston's Galatea in 2-.

Galatea In 2-D. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Double Jeopardy (1994).

Galatea In 2-D (1993). Double Jeopardy (1994). Thunder of the Captains (with H. Lisle) (1996).

Aaron Allston (December 8, 1960 – February 27, 2014) was the author of thirteen Star Wars novels, and several short stories. His repertoire included the Wraith Squadron Trilogy, X-Wing: Starfighters of Adumar, the Enemy Lines Duology, three of the nine-book Legacy of the Force series, followed by three of the nine-book Fate of the Jedi series, and returned to penning the adventures of the Wraith Squadron with X-Wing: Mercy Kill.

Not since Emperor Palpatine have the Jedi battled such monstrous evil. Unless they succeed against staggering odds, the galaxy is doomed. The neutral world of Adumar has decided to pick a side in the war to control the galaxy.

When illustrator Roger Simons realizes that he has the power to pull living beings from his paintings, he must use his newfound abilities to fend off an attack from a powerful--and dangerous--rival. Original.
  • Helldor
I really like Aaron Allston's "Doc Sidhe" books, so I thought I would try this. The premise is that an illustrator discovers that he has the power to create actual things and beings with his art. This is saved from being cartoonish by complex characters and their interactions, and the end is one I didn't see coming, but that perfectly suits the story.
  • Coiron
One of my favorite books of all time. Happy to finally own it. I've never read anything else by this author, but this one is fantastic.
  • Blackseeker
good book,nice fantasy.
  • Blackstalker
My mom told me about "Galatea in 2-D" around 1993, when it first came out. 12 years, two states, and several relocations later, I finally cracked the book open to see what all the fuss was about.

The title evokes images of a creator in love with his creation, and in that regard Galatea in 2-D is faithful: Illustrator Roger Simons discovers that his painting of a magical nymph comes to life in full, three dimensional form. Poor Roger is down on his luck after being slandered by an incident in which he supposedly sent cardboard blanks to Nonesuch Books. As a freelancer, he barely scrapes by, and Roger figures hallucinations are part of his downward spiral into homelessness.

Believing things can't get possibly worse, Roger has the misfortune of bumping into his old rival, Kevin Matthews. Kevin's got everything: the money, the fame, and a hot new wife named Julia. What he doesn't have is talent. But how?

Kevin's success is not without its victims. Kevin's ex-wife, Donna, was once a fellow artist, but now she's a shell of her beautiful former self. Eventually, Roger and Donna discover the common link to their misfortune is actually Kevin.

After Roger confesses to Kevin that he thought his pictures started coming to life, two people show up with the intent of killing him. As a last desperate measure, Kevin and Elsie end up in one of his paintings. And then things get really wacky...

Aaron Allston perfectly nails both the fiscal uncertainty and thrilling creativity of a freelancer, and he takes both to new extremes. What if an artist could create life just by thinking of it? And what if the better the artist, the better the life?

What ensues is essentially a war of wizards, as Kevin and Roger begin a magical duel to the death that spans cities and paintings. Roger and Donna's paintings consist of futuristic science fiction tropes (flying spy drones, robot clones, and laser rifles) while Kevin's paintings are something out of a Harryhausen flick (ancient Greek heroes, gargoyles, and stone Cyclopes). Along the way, Roger discovers his 30-something lust for a perfect dream girl looks a lot like a fellow mature artist than a clueless nymph.

With such limitless possibilities, Allston struggles to contain the plot. Roger decides to paint an incredibly powerful superhero, only to discover that there's a limit to what he can pull into the real world. And yet Kevin has crystal balls that record the goings on of "important people," but not his arch nemesis. When the final battle comes, Kevin seems a little too easily tricked. The conflict is inspired, especially because it takes place at a science fiction convention, but I saw the twist coming a mile away.

All in all, Galatea in 2-D is less about Galatea and more about the artist. For anyone who has ever been a freelancer, his frustration and aspirations make for entertaining (and sometimes painfully accurate) reading. If only we could all blame a Kevin Matthews for whenever a contract goes bad.
  • Priotian
What Aaron Allston does in Galatea in 2D is to take a premise, Artist can draw characters that come to life, and carry it forward to an epic conclusion. One reason I think the book is not better known is that the cover doesn't do it justice. The characters in this book, unlike so many in fantasy novels, actually mature and change throughout the book. The use of humor throughout the book enhances Roger's character. You really get to know him, his strengths and weaknesses.

Roger is a down on his luck artist who discovers a special gift. The antagonist Kevin also has this gift, but uses it to inflate his ego. The best part of this book is the author's imagination in coming up with ways for Roger to use his talent to battle Kevin. The final battle between the two is a tour de force which keeps the reader on edge.
  • Ndlaitha
This story was so awesome, that it just blew me totally away. It was so good, that I read the whole thing in one night. I first found out about this book through Inquest magazine's top fifty ideas for makeing your own Role-Playing Game Scenario. The premise is that an artist finds out that he can bring whatever he paints or draws into reality. He is then found out by a rival who has the same ability as he does. When this happens, they war against eachother. Along the way, the hero is chased by black suited hit men, flesh rotting zombies, and a huge robotic sentinal. What made me like this novel, was it's fast paced story and dialouge. I just couldn't wait to see what the artists would pull out of their paintings next. And if this were made into a motion picture, Eric Stoltz could play the bad guy to a T. Man, I loved this book so much, I am absolutely begging for a sequil, or two, or three! Thank you Mr. Allston for writing this book, please don't let this world pass away please!