almediah.fr
» » The Writing Circle (Voice)

Download The Writing Circle (Voice) eBook

by Corinne Demas

Download The Writing Circle (Voice) eBook
ISBN:
1401341144
Author:
Corinne Demas
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hachette Books; First Edition edition (July 6, 2010)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1314 kb
FB2 book:
1313 kb
DJVU:
1278 kb
Other formats
docx mobi lit rtf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
759


Corinne Demas has written a wonderfully enticing novel about ambitions, conflicting mores, jealousies, and passions as seen through the eyes of the six members of The Leopardi Circle, a New England writing group, and those close to them.

Corinne Demas has written a wonderfully enticing novel about ambitions, conflicting mores, jealousies, and passions as seen through the eyes of the six members of The Leopardi Circle, a New England writing group, and those close to them.

Her mother's third marriage is only hours old when all hope for Clare's fifteenth summer fades

Her mother's third marriage is only hours old when all hope for Clare's fifteenth summer fades. Before she knows it, Clare is whisked away to some ancient cottage on a tiny marsh island on Cape Cod to spend the summer with her father-a man she hasn't seen since she was three. Clare's biological father barely talks, and when he does, he obsesses about endangered turtles. The first teenager Clare meets on the Cape confirms that her father is known as the town crazy person.

Corinne Demas is the author of five novels, two collections of short stories, a collection of poetry, a memoir, two plays, and numerous books for children. She has published more than forty short stories, in a variety of magazines and literary journals. Her publications before 2000 are under the name Corinne Demas Bliss. Corinne Demas grew up in New York City, in Stuyvesant Town, the subject of her memoir, Eleven Stories High, Growing Up in Stuyvesant Town, 1948-1968.

The Writing Circle book. When Nancy, whose most recently published work is a medical newsletter, is asked to join a writing group made up of established writers, she accepts, warily. She's not at all certain that her novel is good enough for the company she'll be keeping.

THE WRITING CIRCLE a novel by CORINNE DEMAS A tale of love, betrayal, and literature: the story of six members of. .Title: The Writing Circle Author: Corinne Demas Publisher: Voice Genre: Women's Fiction, Literary Fiction Length: 305 pages I loved this book.

THE WRITING CIRCLE a novel by CORINNE DEMAS A tale of love, betrayal, and literature: the story of six members of a. It has a slow, steady pace, but one worth indulging.

The Writing Circle, a novel about the lives of members of a writing group, their . The is a wonderful book, tense, engaging, and highly recommended.

The Writing Circle, a novel about the lives of members of a writing group, their relationships to one another and to those outside the circle, is a story as intricate as a Persian carpet. And, like the best weaver, Corinne Demas has you following thread after thread throughout the narrative with a sense of wonder and delight. Anne Bernays, author of The Trophy House. -Karen Joy Fowler, author of The Jane Austen Book Club. Part of what gives this format its enduring appeal is the way it allows readers to dip in and out of each character’s life while also giving multiple perspectives on key events.

Download books for free. FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Corinne Demas is the author of Eleven Stories High (SUNY Press), a memoir of growing up in Stuyvesant Town, and the short story collection What We Save for Last (Milkweed Press). Corinne has also written many books for children, including Saying Goodbye to Lulu (Little, Brown).

Corinne Demas is the author of Eleven Stories High: Growing Up in Stuyvesant Town, 1948-1968, a memoir; two collections of short stories; a collection of poems; and numerous books for children. She has been the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowships as well as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship. More Author Information. Membership Advantages.

They call themselves the Leopardi Circle--six members of a writing group who share much more than their works in progress. When Nancy, whose most recently published work is a medical newsletter, is asked to join a writing group made up of established writers, she accepts, warily. She's not at all certain that her novel is good enough for the company she'll be keeping. Her novel is a subject very close to her heart, and she isn't sure she wants to share it with others, let alone the world. But Nancy soon finds herself as caught up in the group's personal lives as she is with their writing. She learns that nothing--love, family, loyalty--is sacred or certain. In the circle there's Gillian, a beautiful, scheming, world-famous poet; Bernard, a pompous but lovable biographer; Virginia, a respected historian and the peacemaker of the group, who also happens to be Bernard's ex-wife; Chris, a divorced father and successful thriller writer; and Adam, the youngest of the group, an aspiring novelist who is infatuated with Gillian. And then there's Nancy, an unassuming fiction writer embarking on a new chapter in her own life. They meet to read their work aloud and offer feedback. Over the course of a year, marriages are tested, affairs begin, and trust is broken. Through their complicated relationships, these eccentric characters share their families, their beds, and their histories, and soon find that buried secrets have a way of coming to light. Hearts break and emotions are pushed to the limit in this richly engaging tale of love, betrayal, and literature.
  • Light out of Fildon
Thinking about a group of writers sitting around discussing their projects might not seem like an interesting premise for a novel, but the members of the Leopardi Circle detailed in Corrine Demas' The Writing Circle are anything but static and dry. The book follows the circle's newest recruit, Nancy, as she struggles to fathom sharing her latest novel with a group of distinguished writers. While Nancy might be the focus of the book, the five other members of the circle have their own narratives as well, each taking a turn to voice their own chapter with the current goings-on of their lives. Among them is Bernard, Nancy's friend, who writes biographies, and Virginia, his ex-wife who remains on amicable terms with Bernard. Then there's Chris, a divorced mystery writer in dispute with his ex-wife over his children and Adam, the youngest and most inexperienced of the group. However one of the most successful and brazen of the Leopardi Circle, is Gillian, a cut throat poet who Nancy is warned to watch out for. Through her meetings and interactions with the various members of the Leopardi circle, Nancy trudges on, broadening the character she's built around the memory of her father. Centering this charming, character driven mosaic narrative.

One of the hardest things I imagine an author could do, is write about writing, but Demas does it beautifully and with a wide variety of characters at different stages of their lives and at different points of their career. There's different archetypes to be found in each character, like Virginia as the devoted mother, Gillian as the pretentious and manipulative career woman, and Adam as the boy who hasn't quite grown up. Reading each character through their different voices was a joy because each voice was clear and distinct, there was no confusion about what character was speaking and each even seemed to have its own driving force. Many of the characters crossed paths through their children or a friend and in this way it made the narrative complex and interesting. It was in these moments that I didn't want to put the book down and found myself begrudging the fact that I had to go to sleep.

Because of the nature of this book I find it hard to comment on particular events without giving away the entire plot. However Demas' way of entwining the literary conversation with small talk at the meetings was brilliant. I don't think I have ever read a more stimulating conversation on "who versus whom" in a grammatical context. While the craft talk was certainly not the centerpiece of the novel, it was enjoyable because of the characters.

The way the characters approached their work and their lives and seeing how each of them led a writing life was clever and the friendships formed within the circle added to the warmth and depth. Though I thought the novel took a couple chapters to hit its stride, it was a fascinating journey. I believe a large portion of that was because of the different perspectives taken on by each character, particularly as the end of the book approached.

I would recommend this book to anyone who was curious about writing or writer's workshops and enjoys insightful human stories with different perspectives. This is one of my favorites books this year and I highly recommend picking it up on your next trip to the bookstore. The Writing Circle doesn't disappoint and leaves you thinking to the very end.

Final Grade: A+
  • Bundis
Corinne Demas has written a wonderfully enticing novel about ambitions, conflicting mores, jealousies, and passions as seen through the eyes of the six members of The Leopardi Circle, a New England writing group, and those close to them.

There's suave Gillian, the already famous poet in line for a Pulitzer; pompous Bernard who turns out a well-received historical biography approximately once a decade; lonely Chris, a divorced father and successful writer of thrillers; naive Adam, a business man who yearns to be a writer but is as yet unpublished; good-natured Virginia, a well-known historian and Bernard's former wife; and, finally, insecure Nancy, the newest and least confident member, trying to write her first novel.

Six writers, with different personalities and needs, each striving for the same prize: success and recognition through the printed word. Not wanting to spoil the plot, I won't say who gets where or how.

Ms Demas is a fluent writer and smoothly weaves the complicated strands of her characters' lives into an engrossing novel that captures and sustains the reader's interest throughout.
  • Gavikelv
I read this book a few weeks ago for our book club selection. It was a great book for discussion at our club review, however, the book itself was not a great read. I did like the way the author set-up the ending in the Preface - most of us did not give much attention to the preface and it was not until we had read the book that we realized the writer had given us a big clue as to the conclusion. The characters were interesting, but rather shallow.
  • Whitescar
Call me Pollyanna, but I have to admit I am not one who likes to read about dysfunctional "real" people, so this held little appeal. Other than that, it was a fast, easy read, and I was thankful....when it ended.
  • Cordalas
I was most disappointed in The Writing Circle. The style of each chapter being about a different character in the book impeded the flow of the story line. The abrupt switch from story to quotations from the character's writing was distracting. The characters themselves were not very likeable. That being said, it did make for a great discussion at my book club gathering.
  • Brariel
Well crafted characters. The story moves right along. It's easy to dislike the villain, but harder to like the heroes.
  • Vudojar
The characters were sometimes believable and sometimes not....the suspence was to little by about the 2/3 mark, I just didn't care who slept with who or messed with who.....the villian was so BAD she was unbelievable.....and the reason she was so bad was equally unclear and boring.....Just didn't care by the time I got to the end....yarn
The "Writing Circle" was a great read and the best piece of new literature I've come across this summer. The story takes a poignant and unflinching look into the lives of six writers. The writers are as critical and intertwined with each other's personal lives as their fiction. Though there are a dozen different points of view throughout the story, each character is thoroughly unique in all their qualities (and flaws). At under 300 pages, it was a quick read and unexpectedly moving. I would reccomend to anyone looking for a great story.